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Prison Guard Opens Fire On Feds

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posted on Jun, 21 2006 @ 11:02 AM
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TALLAHASSEE, FL: In an attempt to arrest six prison guards alleged to have traded drugs for sex with female inmates, three men were shot this morning, leaving two dead. A guard (as of yet unnamed) refusing arrest, shot and killed an agent with the Department of Justice's Office of Inspector General. A Bureau of Prisons official was also wounded in the return fire. The suspect is believed to be among the two killed.
 



www.cnn.com
The victims' identities and details of the arrest warrants were not released.

The shooting occurred about 7:45 a.m. at a federal detention facility in Tallahassee.

The Tallahassee facility holds mainly women, but includes an area holding men awaiting trial.

The facility was put on lockdown after the shooting, officials said.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


A completely senseless act resulting in the loss of and complete disregard for human life.

Regardless of this man’s association with the alleged acts, any way you look at it, there’s clearly a reminder here of the moral vein of dishonesty, corruption and instability pumping through all levels of government. More importantly though, at increasing levels day-to-day…

A machine can only function properly when all the cogs are well oiled and working in unison. This scapegoat method of blaming figure-heads is one approach, but by no means the end-all answer.

Is all the blame to fall on this prison guard in Tallahassee, Florida? Don’t be silly…But it’s clear to me that there exists in similar isolated domestic disturbances such as this, a lesson which we could learn from and apply to our further-reaching policies.

Related News Links:
www.wpxi.com
seattlepi.nwsource.com
www.heraldnewsdaily.com


[edit on 6/21/2006 by EnronOutrunHomerun]

Edit: Location added.

[edit on 22-6-2006 by intrepid]




posted on Jun, 21 2006 @ 01:23 PM
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This is all over the local news here in south Fl. As usual the powderpuff talking heads down here are all reporting different information. Local newscasting in Miami and Ft Lauderdale is inane and very misleading.

I'm very curious about what really happened. Can't see why the FBI wouldn't expect these guards to be armed as the story reports. Also wondering what would motivate one of the guards to start shooting at the feds. Did he think he could shoot his way out and escape arrest?

Why go to arrest the guards enmasse at the prison. Why not individually at their homes?

Will the media be allowed to show the security camera tapes? I'd like to see who shot first. If they won't release the tapes then I'd really wonder what the actual chain of events was.



posted on Jun, 21 2006 @ 03:55 PM
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Good point rollin....

I had to update the story twice before it was upgraded because of the subtle variations from one source to another...Of course, when I say subtle, I'm only referring to who actually got killed versus who did not


You also bring up another excellent point....

Why arrive at their workplace where they have some pseudo sense of "security" and authority only to strip that away from them in front of their peers and the inmates who have no doubt been hounding them since this first broke out? Not that I give a damn about their egos or reputations here, but we're talking about arresting prison guards at a prison....While they're on duty?? Hmmmm.....

I mean - Were they on probation? Were they in some form of a temporary holding cell? Were they duped into coming into work?

These guys are at a major point in their lives right now, with their jobs and families at stake - You can't assume things are all crystal clear upstairs....It's not a normal day in Pleasantville....

And it’s not as though the US has a glamorous reputation for a fine and upstanding prison system…

It’ll be interesting to see what direction this goes in – I’ll keep my ears to the walls around town and see if I get any interesting perspectives from the locals…



posted on Jun, 21 2006 @ 05:36 PM
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Corruption in our jails is the cause...

the guards were doinking the inmates in return for smuggling drugs and contraband...
in return, the inmates had more control of the guards thru blackmail, so in essence...

the chickens were guarding the fox house.

At $9-$11 per hour, for dealing with inmates that spit on you, throwup on you, get in fights with you, and generally try to make your job dificult,
is it any wonder that they look for fringe benefits?

IMO the FBI wanted to make a statement to the inmates (that complained) that justice would be pursued.

unfortunately, they did it in a situation that usually empowers guards, to "shoot first, find excuses later".

Much like going to a gun range to arrest a gun nut... NOT the best time to do so...

sad sad sad... and the added suck factor...
the FBI (or the dead agents family) will sue the jail for the actions of their officer, and probably win... real money... paid for by the state, and our tax dollars, but not from the shoot happy officers estate... cause at $9 an hour, he owned nada...



posted on Jun, 21 2006 @ 06:00 PM
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from LazarusTheLong

IMO the FBI wanted to make a statement to the inmates (that complained) that justice would be pursued.


You're right, but I think they wanted to make a statement to the prison populace in general.


from EnronOutrunHomerun
Is all the blame to fall on this prison guard in Tallahassee, Florida?


He knew he was busted. Who else should we blame?



posted on Jun, 21 2006 @ 06:11 PM
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Not Encouraging

I hate to be a sideline quarterback, especially when people have died, but this clearly could have been handled much better.

Hopefully lessons learned from this disaster will save lives in the future.



posted on Jun, 21 2006 @ 06:38 PM
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Originally posted by jsobecky
He knew he was busted. Who else should we blame?

I can see where that comment would lead to confusion, however...If you read over that again, I wasn't referring to the incident he was involved in, but rather a justification to my broad ramblings prior to that statement...

Without that comment, someone surely would have replied - But Enron! You can't honestly use this single incident to spur your argument for a corrupt and unstable prison system...

To which I would have replied...Okay - How many hours can you devote per week to go over other examples of similar situations? We'll be discussing this for the next few years judging by my early assumptions.....

You really summarized it all quite beautifully there Lazarus....

And indeed Majic, the planning and execution of these indictments and arrests were not the most textbook of examples to draw from - Small town ways should not influence or derogate big city business, so to speak....Our "little big" city still has a lot of growing up to do....

And while I'm at it here - A brief "update" if you'd call it such....

I’ve heard mixed reports that he may have been armed with his own firearm now….Although I’m assuming that as a prison guard, he probably had a permit….

The guard’s name was Ralph Hill, and it has been confirmed that he was one of the two men killed this morning.



posted on Jun, 21 2006 @ 11:09 PM
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Originally posted by Majic
Not Encouraging

I hate to be a sideline quarterback, especially when people have died, but this clearly could have been handled much better.

Hopefully lessons learned from this disaster will save lives in the future.


I don't know Majic,

They did not learn anything from WACO. Where in my humble opinion, a knock on a door and a request to go with "me" would have been how I would have tried it first.

I agree with the previous poster that stated "why did they not just arrest them at home?"

Not as glamorous, but it gets the job done, and that is the point anyway.

The Feds have a nasty little habit of being "heavyhanded" as a general rule and trying to make the headline news, when a little subtlety would go a long way.

Semper



posted on Jun, 22 2006 @ 07:07 AM
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I may be stretching this a little too much; however, that little red flag just keeps flying in my head on this one. I've got this crazy notion that Mr. Hill was an intentional target.

I'm not saying that he wasn't guilty of some wrongdoing but I really find it hard to believe that anyone would have tried shooting his way out of this situation.
Here's my view of the possiblities:

1. He knew how an ex-prison guard would be treated in prison
and would rather die than take a chance going. Stupid, but
plausable.

2. He had stepped on some toes at the local Fed office. Maybe had
something on one of them. Could be that one of the prisoners
traded him some information about one of the locals that he had
threatened to use while being investigated. Were any of the women
that he delt with involved with any of the state officials there at the
capital?

Either way, all this would be caught on the security tapes and the feds had to have known this. Those are the key. If one of them planned on taking him out they sure did it in a way that would send a clear message to someone.




[edit on 22-6-2006 by rollinoffset]



posted on Jun, 22 2006 @ 07:11 AM
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1. He knew how an ex-prison guard would be treated in prison
and would rather die than take a chance going. Stupid, but
plausible


More than likely THIS is the the case, Stupid? Spend 3 or 4 years in a prison cell see how stupid it is to you then.

I will die before I ever go back. I promise.



[edit on 22-6-2006 by SpittinCobra]



posted on Jun, 22 2006 @ 08:34 AM
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From the Tampa Bay area's channel 10 website:


The FBI agent's name is William "Buddy" Sentner. Worked out of the IG
office in Orlando.

www.tampabays10.com...



posted on Jun, 22 2006 @ 12:12 PM
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Take their weapons !

isn't that the usual response to violent crime ?




posted on Jun, 22 2006 @ 02:26 PM
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Originally posted by rollinoffset
Here's my view of the possiblities:

1. He knew how an ex-prison guard would be treated in prison
and would rather die than take a chance going. Stupid, but
plausable.


No, not all at stupid, rollinoffset. That was a very astute observation, imo.



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