It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Should I make the leap to a Mac/OSX?

page: 1
0
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 18 2006 @ 07:32 PM
link   
I've been a Windows guy for ages, AGES I TELL YOU! Actually, since my dad brought hom the first PC I'd ever really used, some box that said Pony on it and had Windows 3.1.X. This was like in 93 or so.

We got out first household PC in early 95, and jumped on the Windows 95 bandwagon and whatnot.

At any rate, I've used Windows since then with a small exception, when I went to Savannah College of Art and Design. While at SCAD I used the Mac OS to use programs like Photoshop, Illustrator, and the grand daddy of them all (in my iponion) AVID. Then, I left SCAD and went to a "regular college." Back to Windows for me.

I'm just growing tired of Windows. I'm a business systems analyst at my day job (work at a retirement system that runs on SQL 2005 database with a Delphi front end). Although I wouldn't say I'm a "computer guy" I am around a lot of "computer guys" and thus exposed to other options in the desltop environment.

My home Desktop is a Compaq 5420 US, with an AMD Athalon XP 1700 (1.47 GHz), 512 megs of some type of RAM, and a 128MB AGP RAdieon video card. I don't do gamining, and really only have the video card so that I can use my 19" widescreen monitor with the proper resolutions and stuff (the on board video wasn't cutting it).

Here are my basic functions on a PC... e-mail, browsing (heavy browsing), lots of downloads (demos, music, video files, etc), TONS OF WRITING (this is what I do most), and some small video and picture editing.

Now, on PC my e-mail is on Thunderbird, browsing on Firefox, writing on Final Draft 7.0 and Open Office, downloads from the browser or FTP client, and video and picture editing with built in haf ass Windows products.

For the most part (aside from Final Draft) I'm running all open source on a Windows machine. Now, of the applications I use, many of them are available for multiple systems (Mac, Linux, Unix, etc), and the script writing software (Final Draft) has an Open Source offshoot available to Linux, Unix, and Mac OS.

I'd like to get a laptop and am really hesistant at going with Dell or someone else. I've been farting around in the Mac store with OSX and the 15.4 inch MacBook Pro model. I'm really starting to like the Mac OSX platform, but would like to hear form users, other than thosein the Mac store, about some of th problems I might face making the jump.

I have an XP installation disk, not just the one that came with my PC, and am thinking about getting Vista when it comes out. With Bootcamp and or Parallels, I'd be able to have both OSes on the Macbook Pro, which I can't say if I were to get an HP or Dell laptop. The specs on the MB Pro also should fit my needs, as does some of the built in software and stuff.

The only downside, working form home. There isn't anything like Remote Desktop on the MacOS, but I guess running windows from Bootcamp or Parallels gets around this problem huh?

Basically, I'd be a MAc convert that can still fall back on my Windows if the walls come tumbling down, and even then have it on some great hardware.

I'll probably wait until August or later so that I can see what comes out of WWDC and to see what the new Intel Core Duo 2 chips can do in the MB Pros, and how quickly they get put in them.

What are your thoughts?

-O




posted on Jun, 21 2006 @ 09:26 AM
link   
Sounds like you have already convinced yourself going to the light side..



posted on Jun, 22 2006 @ 03:36 AM
link   
I don't honestly have the room to post why you should stay away from OSX.


Most people seem to want a Mac just to say they are "fighting the power". Okay, that's all well and good. If you're not a serious computer user or a computer professional, it really doesn't matter what you use... and I'm all for knocking Microsoft down a peg or two.


Also, everyone always talks about how one OS is better than another when it comes to security and stability without really showing much proof. All I can say on my part is that OS X is a very pretty OS... it's nice eye candy. But it lacks functionality, and while the community aspect of being a Mac user is certainly worth noting, there aren't any solid hardware or software (or price, for that matter) advantages to owning a Mac. You can make a PC do everything a Mac can - but you cannot make a Mac do everything a PC can. Them's the breaks.

I will say, to be fair, that if you are not a wiz at using XP it can prove frustrating, and therefore OSX is like a breath of fresh air. But seriously, if that is the only real benefit, is it worth it?

A site that you may want to check out, though, is right here.



posted on Jun, 22 2006 @ 03:39 AM
link   
Oh, and O, lest I forget - I saw that you mentioned Dell. Please, please research them before you make a decision that will haunt you to your grave.

Flashy ad campaigns do not a good computer / support / or company make.



posted on Jun, 22 2006 @ 11:23 AM
link   

you cannot make a Mac do everything a PC can.


Please expand on this. What can't a Mac do that a PC can?

Since I would most likely use Bootcamp to do a Windows install, I'd still have a PC.

In fact, I'd have a Mac/PC combo laptop. I'd just boot into what OS I needed.

-O



posted on Jun, 22 2006 @ 11:28 AM
link   

Originally posted by Bripe Klmun
Oh, and O, lest I forget - I saw that you mentioned Dell. Please, please research them before you make a decision that will haunt you to your grave.

Flashy ad campaigns do not a good computer / support / or company make.




DELL COMPS SUCK the comp at home is a dell and it was all fine until i found out my schools computers r faster.......there windows 2000 mine was XP



posted on Jun, 22 2006 @ 11:28 AM
link   
sry double clicked post reply

[edit on 22-6-2006 by outrider]



posted on Jun, 22 2006 @ 11:36 AM
link   


A site that you may want to check out, though, is right here.


Great comparision site BTW, I found this the other day as well.

-O



posted on Jun, 23 2006 @ 01:16 AM
link   

Originally posted by The Big O

you cannot make a Mac do everything a PC can.


Please expand on this. What can't a Mac do that a PC can?

Since I would most likely use Bootcamp to do a Windows install, I'd still have a PC.

In fact, I'd have a Mac/PC combo laptop. I'd just boot into what OS I needed.

-O


It's mostly a matter of programs that are not Mac-friendly... in which case is a load of them. Before you jump on Boot Camp, try reading this particular review. It seems like a good idea, but it's a big program, considering you have to buy and load up XP on top of it. We got word last week at work that Vista (I'm ironically enough working on the program for MS Denmark, even though I hate Windows) won't even work with it - so there's that future tidbit to think of, as well.



posted on Jun, 23 2006 @ 11:58 AM
link   
Supposivly the MAC G5 was the worlds fastest computer system. Untill Alienware computers put the G5 to shame in 6 out of 7 benchmark tests.

www.alienware.com...


Im sticking with PC. Microsoft hasn't let me down yet, nor do I have any problems with secruity or anything else.



posted on Jun, 23 2006 @ 01:00 PM
link   
I made the switch over last year (Powerbook G4 17in) and don't regret it one bit. Miss the constant reinstalls? Problems with hardware recognition? Security concerns? Not one bit...

The beauty of Macs is of course, their ease of use, logical design and intuitiveness of its features. Everything is designed with a purpose to provide harmony and it shows. PLUS, they look good. Take your laptop to a coffee shop or anywhere and you'll get at least 5 people giving you envious looks and even coming over to have a look.


Try doing that with a Dell.


I use mine for writing, design and downloading media. I love it. Love the sleekness of my laptop and anything I want to install is a cinch.

No more hitting your head against your keyboard, trying to figure out what is incompatible with what.

You are going to get hardcore PCs users try to defend the cause. Really it is a personal choice. But for looks, performance and easy of use, Macs are hard to beat. As Steve Jobs 'sort of' said, Macs pretty much sell themselves. I for one would not go back to PCs.



posted on Jun, 23 2006 @ 01:57 PM
link   

Originally posted by Bripe Klmun
We got word last week at work that Vista (I'm ironically enough working on the program for MS Denmark, even though I hate Windows) won't even work with it - so there's that future tidbit to think of, as well.


Check this out: www.engadget.com...

Also, Parallels version 3.0 is going to support Vista, or so they say.

-O



posted on Jun, 23 2006 @ 08:31 PM
link   

Originally posted by nikelbee
I made the switch over last year (Powerbook G4 17in) and don't regret it one bit. Miss the constant reinstalls? Problems with hardware recognition? Security concerns? Not one bit...

The beauty of Macs is of course, their ease of use, logical design and intuitiveness of its features. Everything is designed with a purpose to provide harmony and it shows. PLUS, they look good. Take your laptop to a coffee shop or anywhere and you'll get at least 5 people giving you envious looks and even coming over to have a look.


Try doing that with a Dell.


I use mine for writing, design and downloading media. I love it. Love the sleekness of my laptop and anything I want to install is a cinch.

No more hitting your head against your keyboard, trying to figure out what is incompatible with what.

You are going to get hardcore PCs users try to defend the cause. Really it is a personal choice. But for looks, performance and easy of use, Macs are hard to beat. As Steve Jobs 'sort of' said, Macs pretty much sell themselves. I for one would not go back to PCs.



You have to be kidding right? Constant reinstalles?? Only paranoid people that dont know how to configure windows constantly reinstall. Problems with hardware recognition? Holy crap, can't believe you said that, Windows XP alone comes with the largest standard driver database included in ANY O.S. ive found that many times I dont even have to install drivers for certain things because they are already included. The last time I ever had a hardware recognition problem was when the hardware was faulty, I warrantied the hardware, got a new same exact one, and it worked flawlessly. And I have ZERO security concerns. With the proper computer knowledge, secruty is the last thing you worry about. With a good virus scan, and proper internet usage. And a decent ethernet activity logger, NOTHING will get in your way.

Also.. NEVER buy a Dell. Buy an Alienware laptop, or Toshiba, or something else. NEVER get a Dell.

Incompatible? Please tell me something that you tried to use on a PC that is incompatible. If that actaully ever happened, I guarantee the reason it is incompatible is because you the buyer didn't have correct knowledge when buying that product.


MAC sells itself?? surrreeee, when was the last time you seen a Windows XP commercial? LOL. I can't stop seeing MAC commercials, they are all over the place.


As an end note to my comment, I would like to say, If you dont know anything about computers, don't get mad at them when you come across a problem that is 99.9% human error.

[edit on 23-6-2006 by LAES YVAN]



posted on Jun, 23 2006 @ 08:45 PM
link   
Having used both a mac (powermac g5 2.0 dual) and a pc (amd athlon xp 2200) here's my 2 cents.

You have a much wider range of software choices on the PC.
Most programs you can get on a mac you can get on a pc (or a similar program)
the mac does run a lot smoother than a pc (never had one hang up or freeze up on the mac)
the security issues...well if you know how to set up proper security on a pc, then it shouldnt be an issue.
the mac seems to need less updates (drivers and whatnot) then a pc.
Unless your doing things like video editing, there really is no need for a mac. Sure the pc can do video editing, but I've used AVID on both pc (custom systems set up at a broadcast school) and mac, and the pc version was very unstable in comparison.

I am actually trying to sell my mac now....why? because I just dont use it as much as my pc. Sure the mac is great, runs smooth and everything (programs) feel integrated, but unless you are doing video editing or music producing, you can more than get by on a pc. If anyone out there is interested in buying a used powermac g5 2.0ghz dual, 512mb pc3200, 160gb hd, superdrive 4x dvd rw, airport extreme card, 20" dvi lcd cinema display, airport express unit, mighty mouse, jbl 2.1 speaker system and final cut express hd U2U me. everything is in near perfect condition.



posted on Jun, 23 2006 @ 11:00 PM
link   
Having used AVID at SCAD, and pretty indepth doing freelance work afterwards, that's one of my main reasons for getting one. However, I won't have a specialized set-up, so it won't be the same as when I was in the booth. However, I haven't had a chance to ge tmy hands on Final Cut Pro, which I'm itching to do.

I guess, for me, since I've got the 200-300 extra bucks to spare, I don't see a reason why I shouldn't just get the MacBook Pro. I mean, I've got a Windows XP disk, and will probably pick up Vista for my desktop anyway, so I'll have that too.

Some good points were brought up, so I decided to wait until after the new year for three reasons. First, Vista will be out and I'll be able to see if and how it can run on a Mac. Two, the new Intel Core Due 2 chips will be out, and possibly a quad core or two. Three, WWDC will have come and gone so I'll have seen anything that is upcomming on the Apple front that's worth waiting for (such as project redbox).

Thanks to everyone for the help.

-O



posted on Jun, 24 2006 @ 03:26 AM
link   

Originally posted by The Big O

Originally posted by Bripe Klmun
We got word last week at work that Vista (I'm ironically enough working on the program for MS Denmark, even though I hate Windows) won't even work with it - so there's that future tidbit to think of, as well.


Check this out: www.engadget.com...

Also, Parallels version 3.0 is going to support Vista, or so they say.

-O


I had seen that - the Beta of Vista works, because it's far from the full release version. The actual public download isn't the one that we're working with - so someone in the office gave it a try yesterday (due to discussion on this topic and that blog entry at Engadget) with their iMAc and it just won't work at all. I don't know if it's a hoax or it's just because the public beta works.

I haven't heard about Parallels running with it, so that should be worth a look once things are a bit more along.

[edit on 24/6/06 by Bripe Klmun]



posted on Jun, 24 2006 @ 10:41 AM
link   
Yeah, Vista can't be loaded directly through bootcamp, the Beta I mean. Something about some EFI partition or whatnot created during the bootcamp partioning.

Anyway, the OSX86 forums have some pretty good info about the hacks needed to get it up and running. It's not a hoax, but not something easy to do.

I think the main challenge is that Vista will use BIOS, andMacs use something else (Maybe this is the EFI think?). Something about the I/O interface being different between the two. Parallels, which is virtualization, will use some sort of interface in 3.0 to get around this issue, or so they say.

I really don't see this being much of an issue to be honest. I bet Jobs will talk about it at WWDC, as a lot of people already want to be able to run Vista on Macs, and I'd rather have both OSes myself to be honest.

On an interesting note, I'm also contemplating running Linux, even if it's just to fart around with. One of my coworkers brought in his dual boot laptop thats running the SuSE intall of Linix and I got quite the kick out of it.

Bripe, what's your experiance with Linux, being that you seem to be into development?

-O



posted on Jun, 25 2006 @ 04:10 AM
link   
I got my first copy of Linux in 1999 - it was SuSE (somewhere in the 6's...6.4, maybe?). I think I paid the absurd $30 for it at that time, and I was determined to get in on what all of these rumblings were on about.

Boy was I PO'd after installing it. None of my PC cards worked, my machine acted as though it were posessed... I nearly gave up.

That didn't last long, as I ended up working in an environment with all-UNIX systems and didn't have a choice. I shortly switched over to Mandrake at home and that was pretty much that. Right now I have two of my four machines running Linux - and a couple of my many hats at work are supporting Linux users remotely and on-site as well as tuning Linux for client applications. In November I'm taking over as the Linux kernel developer.

It happened that quickly - 7 years from total frustration to working with it every day.

If you're really wanting to give it a go, I can't help but feel happy for you. I seriously recommend that you get Ubuntu. It supports PC, 64-bit PC and PowerPC architectures... and they'll send you as many free CDs as you like at no cost to you.



posted on Jun, 25 2006 @ 08:21 AM
link   
The difference in stability between a Mac and a Windows PC is more an hardware than a software issue.

Macs have always run only on specific hardware, while Windows does not have a clue what kind of hardware will be used.

I have always used Asus motherboards for my computers. They are not the fastest boards on the tests but they are the most stable.

Even with Windows 95 I only had 2 computer lock-ups in a year.

I can even plug and unplug IDE hard disks and PCI cards without turning the computer off and then I just make it search for new hardware to have it installed.

There are some programs that run better on Macs than on Windows PCs, like Photoshop, maybe because they never intended to be a Windows program, but anything you can do with a Mac you can do with Windows.

Oh, and do not forget the Unix/Linux way, after all, the Mac OS now is just a disguised Unix.



posted on Jun, 25 2006 @ 08:41 AM
link   
There are quite a few miss truths written above about both systems from fanboys.

Get what you want.

I PERSONALLY own a mac and a PC. I used the PC for CAD and other random engineering related software, and the Mac for browsing, letters, other day-to-day stuff. (it's a G5 so no boot-camp for me... yet.)

A PC can be stable, but you need to get good quality components from respected vendors, like video cards and such, to ensure you don't get any conflicts or poorly written drivers.

Both systems have their downsides. The main two that I PERSONALLY find are:

Mac -- can't run some programmes that you might need natively. Although there is a technology in development that will allow you to run windows programmes inside mac os at full speed.

PC -- Viruses & spyware. You have to give up system resources to constantly protect yourself from the wankers who write these programmes.



new topics




 
0
<<   2 >>

log in

join