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Liquid Universe

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posted on Jun, 15 2006 @ 09:13 PM
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Has anyone read the June 10-16 New Scientist cover story? It's awesome! Pawel Mazur a physicist at University of South Carolina in Columbia and George Chapline of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California are the minds behind this. Space-Time is actually a superfluid, and the universe rotates on an axis. We're apparently also in this immense thing called a "gravastar". You should check it out!


flux




[edit on 15-6-2006 by Schizoflux]




posted on Jun, 15 2006 @ 10:45 PM
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Hmm.

But doesn't this tend to contradict the superstring theory of the origin of the universe? Or does it?



posted on Jun, 15 2006 @ 10:59 PM
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My only issue with these theories are just that, they're baseless theories. All you need is a PH'D in Astromological studies from a community college and all of a sudden anybody believes you about anything.

"Oh yeah, uh, heres my theory of the universe...we're actually in a large Swedish man's Anus. Give me money."

Untill I see some good evidence to support any claim, I see no purpose in believing in what some guy says our universe is :T



posted on Jun, 16 2006 @ 10:35 AM
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So you haven't read the article? www.newscientist.com...
If your not a member there is a small fee to read in it's entirety. Thats life. Byrd, negative sir, this theory does not contradict string theory. In fact the calculations done in string theory probaly helped develop this cosmological view.



posted on Jun, 16 2006 @ 11:22 PM
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Originally posted by Schizoflux
Byrd, negative sir, this theory does not contradict string theory. In fact the calculations done in string theory probaly helped develop this cosmological view.


I think the "star" in the name confused me, so I went back to do some research on what this is (a star simply doesn't have enough mass for a universe.)

For everyone else who went "huh?" over the term, here's the link to the Wikipedia article. It seems that this is an alternative to the Black Hole theory, and is under a special case called "quantum gravity."
en.wikipedia.org...

So this isn't a proven, but a theory that's offered and is being cussed and discussed in the academic community. Scientists tend to favor simple solutions over complicated ones, and while this is an interesting theory, I don't believe anyone's proposed a way of testing it.

That's a critical phase.



posted on Jun, 18 2006 @ 07:40 AM
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Any object can be thought of as a liquid, in the sense that the universe is a soup of particles, above all.

Glass is a liquid, for example, and that is the reason that it is transparent. Given enough time, glass melts, albeit very slowly.

In the same manner, even the hardest object can be thought of as a liquid, under the correct circumstances. For example, a diamond placed near a black hole will melt like a liquid due to gravitational pressure.



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