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Hubble Finds Galaxy on Edge

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posted on Jun, 9 2006 @ 09:52 AM
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The Hubble Telescope reveals to us an amazing view of Galaxy NGC 5866 on its edge. The picture from the Hubble reveals many features of the galaxy, such as its type, a S0 (S Zero) spiral galaxy, its size, roughly two-thirds the size of the Milky Way, and even the galaxy's past. Overall, an interesting find for the Hubble.
 



hubblesite.org
Hubble's sharp vision reveals a crisp dust lane dividing the galaxy into two halves. The image highlights the galaxy's structure: a subtle, reddish bulge surrounding a bright nucleus, a blue disk of stars running parallel to the dust lane, and a transparent outer halo.

For spiral galaxies, the incidence of these fingers of dust correlates well with indicators of how many stars have been formed recently, as the input of energy from young massive stars moves gas and dust around to create these structures. The thinness of dust lanes in S0s has been discussed in ground-based galaxy atlases, but it took the resolution of Hubble to show that they can have their own smaller fingers and chimneys of dust.

NGC 5866 lies in the Northern constellation Draco, at a distance of 44 million light-years (13.5 Megaparsecs). It has a diameter of roughly 60,000 light-years (18,400 parsecs) only two-thirds the diameter of the Milky Way, although its mass is similar to our galaxy. This Hubble image of NGC 5866 is a combination of blue, green and red observations taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys in November 2005.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


I've always been interested in the amazing pictures from the Hubble, and this one is amazing, if only because of its oddity compared to what we have seen before. I think these discoveries are reason enough to keep the Hubble program alive, or prompt the speed up of a replacement program.

Do yourself a favor and take a look at the higher resolution images. (The largest tops out at about 23MB) The images are amazing, and not only for the galaxy in question, but for all the other details of the picture as well.

Edit: Title.

[edit on 9-6-2006 by intrepid]




posted on Jun, 9 2006 @ 11:41 AM
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beautiful shot. God damn, why can't we figure out how to get there? lol. someday......



posted on Jun, 9 2006 @ 11:46 AM
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Very cool. I've found my new wallpaper
.

[edit on 9/6/2006 by Umbrax]



posted on Jun, 9 2006 @ 12:18 PM
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Originally posted by Mouth
beautiful shot. God damn, why can't we figure out how to get there? lol. someday......




It's our God-given ability to invent which just may give us the opportunity to explore the universe. Sounds wrong to damn Him/Her/It when that is the source of creativity.

Interesting pic, Sarcasimo...I wonder how long it will be before APOD uses it (or have they already)?

Edit to put the H in 'Her'

[edit on 9-6-2006 by masqua]


apc

posted on Jun, 9 2006 @ 12:35 PM
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Awesome shot.

Ive always wondered something but never found out. In images like these you can obviously see a hundred other galaxies in the background. Where are the single points of light? Are they stars in our own galaxy caught in the picture? Are they strays floating around? Are they galaxies as well that only appear to be single points?



posted on Jun, 9 2006 @ 12:38 PM
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Awesome picture, very beautiful.


jra

posted on Jun, 9 2006 @ 08:35 PM
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Originally posted by apc
Where are the single points of light? Are they stars in our own galaxy caught in the picture? Are they strays floating around? Are they galaxies as well that only appear to be single points?


My guess is that they would be stars within our own Galaxy. Especially the ones with the 'rainbowy cross' (for lack of a better term). Some of the smaller/dimmer points of light could be galaxies really far away though.

[edit on 9-6-2006 by jra]


apc

posted on Jun, 9 2006 @ 09:38 PM
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yes the [large] one in the top right really seems to be within our own galaxy. I know nothing of the optics involved. I wonder if focus matters beyond a certain distance?

[edit on 9-6-2006 by apc]



posted on Jun, 11 2006 @ 01:09 PM
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And for those of you who like these pictures here is a gallery of them.
heritage.stsci.edu...

*edit*
And Here
hubblesite.org...

[edit on 6-11-2006 by Sarcasimo]



posted on Jun, 11 2006 @ 02:58 PM
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Nice!

Good to see you again Sarcasimo, how was your year long ats vacation?



posted on Jun, 11 2006 @ 03:05 PM
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Nice job sarcasimo,i have the hubble telescope webshots screensaver. If anyone wants to know what heaven looks like,it lies in those pics.



posted on Jun, 12 2006 @ 08:51 AM
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I was wondering how long it would take for this website to carry the pic...

Apparently not to0 long.

Here it is today (June 12, 06)

antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov...
.

edit for spelling



[edit on 12-6-2006 by masqua]



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