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Army Officer Refuses To Go To War

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posted on Jun, 26 2006 @ 02:38 PM
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In this interview, Lt Watada outlines his reasons for deciding not to go to Iraq.

He is not a robot. He is a person with a conscience.


"At that time when I joined up I had no reason to believe that our leaders, the government, the administration would betray the trust of the people........I felt that it was my responsibility as an officer to find out everything I could about war in general in order to better prepare my troops and train them for combat deployment. I also began reading a whole broad base of articles on the Iraq war on what was going on there at the time and what has led us up to that point. What I found was deeply shocking, not only as a person but also as a member of the military......learning that the administration had betrayed the trust of the people, had deceived us into going into this war that was totally unnecessary and unrelated to the war on terrorism."
Watadas reaction was one of shame, "knowing that our government was doing this in our name. I had to come to a decision on what I was going to do; inside I was in a lot of turmoil. On one hand I had my duty as I knew it, to obey every order without question, to do what I was told, what everyone else was doing, going over to Iraq and fight."
"On the other hand I knew that we were not fighting for Democracy, we were not fighting just terrorist, we were fighting an indigenous insurgency who was resisting our occupation. And many lives were being sacrificed for what I thought was nothing. I came to the point where I could no longer look at the pain and suffering of so many members of the armed forces, so many families being devastated by these loses, and the grief and suffering of Iraqi citizens and all for what I felt was an intentional deception, to wage a war without any purpose, without any noble purpose."


He also says that he offered to "go quietly" as a conscientious objector, but that the Army decided that was not an option. I think that deals with the pompous assertion that this "stinks of someone wanting their fifteen minutes of fame". I suspect that whoever posted that finds independent thought a bit threatening.

This is someone who'd rather go to prison in Leavenworth for 5 years than fight in a war he believes, on the basis of wide research and reading, is illegal. He deserves respect rather than the slanders he's received from the patriotic robots that have infested this thread thus far.

[edit on 26-6-2006 by rich23]




posted on Jun, 26 2006 @ 03:22 PM
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A Matter Of Respect


Originally posted by rich23
He deserves respect rather than the slanders he's received from the patriotic robots that have infested this thread thus far.

You are welcome to express whatever opinions you want about the article and Mr. Watada.

But when you start making comments like these about other members, you are violating the T&C.

Do not insult other members.



posted on Jan, 4 2007 @ 01:11 AM
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Originally posted by rich23
He also says that he offered to "go quietly" as a conscientious objector, but that the Army decided that was not an option. I think that deals with the pompous assertion that this "stinks of someone wanting their fifteen minutes of fame". I suspect that whoever posted that finds independent thought a bit threatening.

This is someone who'd rather go to prison in Leavenworth for 5 years than fight in a war he believes, on the basis of wide research and reading, is illegal. He deserves respect rather than the slanders he's received from the patriotic robots that have infested this thread thus far.

[edit on 26-6-2006 by rich23]


He still has his responsibilities to his men, and by doing something like this how do you think that affects their morale? In turn does that not effect their combat effectiveness? I wont slander the man, but my opinion in the matter is that he enlisted after the war began, what made him think that there was absolutely no chance that he would be deployed? This is what stinks to me. Common sense and deductive reasoning should tell you that if you join the army when there is a shooting war overseas, you could be sent there. He knew the risks before hand and now is backing out on his men and his duties as an officer.



posted on Jan, 4 2007 @ 01:18 PM
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Since the American army is called a defense force what obligation does officers or servicemen have to go bomb or occupy countries that have never attacked the US or even threatened to do so? Since when can you court martial someone for disobeying the illegal order that force him to occupy another country in direct opposition for international convention?

Since war was never declared on Iraq ( OIF 2003) what legal or moral constitutional obligations does he really have?

Why assume that he signed up to attach other countries instead of defend his country when actually under attack?

Stellar



posted on Jan, 4 2007 @ 02:20 PM
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Sorry, I haven't read through the whole thread, but I have a question:

Can a soldier not refuse to obey an order which he believes is illegal?

Because I am pretty damn sure they are obliged too.....

(Now, proving that the order was ACTUALLY legal is a matter for the Court Martial or Commanding Officer, I suppose, but that is another matter entirely)



posted on May, 20 2008 @ 12:49 PM
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reply to post by Rockpuck
 


Correction mason, he joined the war when he and every American beleived the lie that Iraq had something to do with 911.. its nice to call someone a coward that has no combat xp. Your the coward.



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