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Treatment of US prosecuted Kurds is dismaying

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posted on Jun, 7 2006 @ 12:19 AM
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I heard something about this on the radio today, and thought I'd look it up... This is the only article I could find:




Treatment of prosecuted Kurds is dismaying

"We know you're not the bad guys."

When U.S. attorney Bill Gould said this to Rasheed Qambari and three other Kurdish men, he meant it. During Saddam Hussein's brutal regime they'd been firmly pro-U.S., working for a U.S.-funded nongovernmental organization in Iraq. In the late 1990s, their lives in danger, our government rushed them across the border to Turkey, and eventually to Harrisonburg for a new life. Many left behind were executed or disappeared.

...

But now Rasheed and three other Kurds have been charged with felony money transfers under the U.S. Patriot Act. They are devastated, facing jail, fines, a felony record, halted citizenship proceedings and the fear of deportation.

What did these men do to make the FBI think they were bad guys? Actually nothing different from what they had been doing -- perfectly legally -- for several years: supporting their families here and back home. With no functioning banking system in Iraq, sending money home was complicated. So Rasheed and several other trusted men helped transfer money for other Kurds here. They deposited the money in their Harrisonburg banks, with assurances the procedures were proper, and had the banks wire it to bank accounts of friends in neighboring countries or the U.S.-funded NGO they'd worked for before, which distributed it.

More...



Another fine example of form over function...




posted on Jun, 7 2006 @ 10:46 AM
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Originally posted by loam

Another fine example of form over function...




Aren't you being a little bit hasty in making a decision in this case? One article is hardly enough information to form and fair and honest opinion, all you have is one side and that is their side



posted on Jun, 7 2006 @ 10:52 AM
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Wait a second, they broke the law and you expect some kind of leniency for that? Why should they be excused from crimes that would land you, me or any other person in jail? No banking system in Iraq? Tough. They worked hard to bring it down.

It appears to me that the Kurds are organized around the peshmerga and its warlords. I wouldn't be surprised if their dealings were shady and for example (just for example) they were trafficking drugs.



posted on Jun, 7 2006 @ 06:47 PM
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Originally posted by shots
Aren't you being a little bit hasty in making a decision in this case? One article is hardly enough information to form and fair and honest opinion, all you have is one side and that is their side


Not as hasty as your response.
You clearly did not read the article:



"We know you're not the bad guys."

When U.S. attorney Bill Gould said this to Rasheed Qambari and three other Kurdish men

...

But the shame is misplaced. It belongs on the conscience of U.S. Attorney John Brownlee, who seemingly builds a career by instructing Gould, a decent man doing his job, to rack up easy convictions against innocent people.



Like I said....form over function.... :shk:



posted on Jun, 7 2006 @ 06:56 PM
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Originally posted by Aelita
Wait a second, they broke the law and you expect some kind of leniency for that?


I suppose you've never heard of Prosecutorial discretion.





...in the United States...the public prosecutor has discretion whether or not to file a formal accusation; in effect, this means that he can informally grant clemency to an offender who would certainly be convicted in court...





Originally posted by Aelita
Why should they be excused from crimes that would land you, me or any other person in jail?


See above...



Originally posted by Aelita
No banking system in Iraq? Tough. They worked hard to bring it down.


How mighty realistic of you....



Originally posted by Aelita
It appears to me that the Kurds are organized around the peshmerga and its warlords. I wouldn't be surprised if their dealings were shady and for example (just for example) they were trafficking drugs.


That statement is RACIST beyond belief.... :shk: You've indicted the Kurds who are the subject of this thread with the Kurds you speak of simply because they are KURDS?????


It appears you didn't read the article either.... :shk:




During Saddam Hussein's brutal regime they'd been firmly pro-U.S., working for a U.S.-funded nongovernmental organization in Iraq. In the late 1990s, their lives in danger, our government rushed them across the border to Turkey, and eventually to Harrisonburg for a new life.



What a lovely way to treat our friends....

[edit on 7-6-2006 by loam]



posted on Jun, 7 2006 @ 07:39 PM
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Originally posted by loam

Not as hasty as your response.
You clearly did not read the article:



Oh I read it alright. I just happen to have a different opinion on the article then you do. Unlike you I took into consideration who said they said that and that was their lawyer



posted on Jun, 7 2006 @ 08:23 PM
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Originally posted by shots
Oh I read it alright. I just happen to have a different opinion on the article then you do. Unlike you I took into consideration who said they said that and that was their lawyer


Then your difficulty is one of reading comprehension...


The article states:




...U.S. Attorney John Brownlee...instructing Gould...to rack up easy convictions...



For your convenience, you can read about him here:





Mr. Gould graduated from Washington and Jefferson College and the University of Virginia School of Law. Mr. Gould clerked for The Honorable Morton A. Brody in the District of Maine. Mr. Gould was an associate at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom in Washington, D.C., and was an Assistant United States Attorney with the U.S. Attorney's Office in Washington, D.C., prior to joining the Western District's office in Charlottesville.

Source.



Nice try.




[edit on 7-6-2006 by loam]



posted on Jun, 7 2006 @ 08:38 PM
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Originally posted by loam


Then your difficulty is one of reading comprehension...
The article states:



I know what the article stated; it stated that his lawyer (The writer of the article) made a statement that was what was said by the individual, however neither you nor I have anyway of confirming that was the case. I tend to think it was a misquote which lawyers so often do when they try and put their clients in a better light.

In reality the quote really has little to do with the fact he did transfer money without a license and that in case you are not aware of it is against both federal and state laws


If You did it I would expect them to arrest you. I am sure you would feel likewise if I did the same.



posted on Jun, 7 2006 @ 08:54 PM
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Originally posted by shots
I know what the article stated; it stated that his lawyer (The writer of the article) made a statement that was what was said by the individual, however neither you nor I have anyway of confirming that was the case.

The article only stated that the writer was a lawyer.

Here is another article about this, which states

Darren Bostic, Rashid’s attorney, says prosecutors have not alleged that the unlicensed business sent money to terrorists.


and


"It’s wonderful to see this many people ready to sign their names and speak out," said Ruth Stoltzfus Jost, who published an opinion column about the case in the Daily News-Record.


No mention about being anyone's lawyer...
www.kurdmedia.com...

This probably sums up the argument quite well. Do you not understand the concept shots?

"By the letter of the law, they have violated it," Kreutzer said. "But it seems outside the spirit of the law."



posted on Jun, 7 2006 @ 09:05 PM
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Originally posted by Jamuhn


"It’s wonderful to see this many people ready to sign their names and speak out," said Ruth Stoltzfus Jost, who published an opinion column about the case in the Daily News-Record.

No mention about being anyone's lawyer...
www.kurdmedia.com...



Ok I stand corrected it was not his lawyer




This probably sums up the argument quite well.


"By the letter of the law, they have violated it," Kreutzer said. "But it seems outside the spirit of the law."


I stand by the bold print. They/he broke the law therefore they should pay the piper just as if I or you had done it. Ignorance of the law is no excuse. They/he could have gotten a license and they did not that is the bottom line.



posted on Jun, 7 2006 @ 09:16 PM
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Originally posted by shots
I stand by the bold print. They/he broke the law therefore they should pay the piper just as if I or you had done it. Ignorance of the law is no excuse. They/he could have gotten a license and they did not that is the bottom line.


Which returns me to my original point... FORM over FUNCTION




[edit on 7-6-2006 by loam]




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