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The Acoustics of Urine

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posted on Jun, 3 2006 @ 11:58 AM
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so i thought about something while i was alleviating last nights binge drinking...

why, the wider and deeper a body of water gets, does the sound reach a lower tone? i've been to school for sound engineering, so if anyone can explain this to me don't be afraid to use technical jargon.




posted on Jun, 3 2006 @ 12:05 PM
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sorry i cant provide you with an answer or an opinion for that matter... i am hardly versed in acoustics but i just had to comment in this urine thread.





posted on Jun, 3 2006 @ 12:11 PM
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Originally posted by 25cents
so i thought about something while i was alleviating last nights binge drinking...

why, the wider and deeper a body of water gets, does the sound reach a lower tone? i've been to school for sound engineering, so if anyone can explain this to me don't be afraid to use technical jargon.


I'm going to just take a very wild stab at this. Try comparing a timpani to a snare drum.
Wouldn't the size of the area the sound travels be the reason. The more water there is, the lower the tone because the high tones are being absorbed more? Just a guess, like I said.


apc

posted on Jun, 3 2006 @ 03:06 PM
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Because the pitch of the splash directly correlates to the size of your penis.

It's just the surface area of the disturbance. Like drums.



posted on Jun, 3 2006 @ 03:14 PM
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ok i just had to come in here and see if you lot were actually talking about the sound of pee

must be a man thing



to answer your question though yes if the volume of water is greater the sound is deeper.



posted on Jun, 3 2006 @ 04:56 PM
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i think i get it...the larger the 'head' of the 'drum' the longer wavelengths can be achieved, allowing for a lower overall pitch.

pretty simple, actually, but i was still kinda drunk this morning and not thinking right. thanks.



posted on Jun, 3 2006 @ 05:09 PM
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Will the Y-Chrome ever cease to amaze me?

I can't believe this thread is in the Science & Technology section.

Now, I want an admission and a report of exactly how to use this notion to play a tune. Oh - we'll need a podcast for proof.



posted on Jun, 3 2006 @ 05:14 PM
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Originally posted by Relentless
Will the Y-Chrome ever cease to amaze me?

I can't believe this thread is in the Science & Technology section.

Now, I want an admission and a report of exactly how to use this notion to play a tune. Oh - we'll need a podcast for proof.



yup we need Links people and lots of them. podcast is a good idea, yup and a minute by minute guide on how you created said tune.



posted on Jun, 3 2006 @ 05:19 PM
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i'm gonna need some help...

and it's a question of acoustics, so i felt that it was a science question.



posted on Jun, 3 2006 @ 06:36 PM
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Okay - finally where this belongs - on BTS - let it rip girls - LOLOL



posted on Jun, 3 2006 @ 06:46 PM
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guess i was wrong. crap.



posted on Jun, 3 2006 @ 06:49 PM
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No prob 25 - now we can start submitting requests. I would like to hear a tempestuous full orchestra classical theme please.



posted on Jun, 5 2006 @ 09:33 AM
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The wider and deeper a body of liquid gets, the more its mass increases. This causes its resonant frequency to fall. Frequency is pitch: a lower frequency means a lower pitch or 'tone'.

Note for non-acousticians: the resonant frequency of a mechanical system (such as a pottyful of pee) is the frequency at which it can be made to oscillate (vibrate) with the greatest amplitude (volume) for the smallest input of energy. It is therefore the frequency at which the largest (loudest) waves are formed in the liquid (and transferred thence through the air to our ears). That makes the sound you hear and accounts for the lowering of pitch from the potty as it fills.

I'm not sure about the increase in amplitude (volume) of the sound emitted. It could be a question of increasing surface area delivering greater efficiency at the air/pee interface, it could be because it takes less energy to produce equivalent amplitude in vibrating effluvium, or it could be a psychoacoustic effect caused by the nonlinearity of the human auditory apparatus.

Can't you upload a sample of the sound and post a link to it here so that everyone can hear just what you're talking about?



posted on Jun, 5 2006 @ 03:19 PM
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This belongs in the Science Forum.
Due to Y chromosome is Y we ask Y.
Or is it not science if we talk about pee-pee?

Notice however, when giving a urine specimen....yeah I said that.
The pitch goes higher, as it fills..But, if you tap on the side as it fills, the pitch goes down.
If you have good ears, you can hear the accoustics of the liquid, AND the accuoustics of the surrounding air.



posted on Jun, 5 2006 @ 04:31 PM
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they took away my scientific grant for study. sorry y'all.

and i don't have any way to record the Sound of Mus...Urine, sorry. you've all had some great ideas.



posted on Jun, 6 2006 @ 02:41 AM
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Originally posted by spacedoubt
If you tap on the side as it fills, the pitch goes down.

That's because your tapping causes the pitcher to vibrate at a lower pitch.


If you have good ears, you can hear the accoustics of the liquid, AND the accuoustics of the surrounding air.

This is true. You a musician?



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