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Favorite Short Stories

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posted on Jun, 1 2006 @ 08:57 PM
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this is a thread i have created for everyone to post their favorite short stories, and discuss them.

i have recently read "by the waters of babylon" by Stephen Vincent Benet. this story is amazing, taking place in a future post-apocalyptic world, in which todays realities,well actually, the early 1900's, have become legends.

i highly recommend this to everyone, especially those interested in science fiction and fantasy.




posted on Jun, 1 2006 @ 09:12 PM
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Cool idea for a thread.

One of my favourites would have to be 'The Streets of Ashkelon'(1965) by Harry Harrison.

A sci-fi story set on the distant planet of Wesker's World. A hermitic trader clashes with a missionary who has arrived to 'save' the non-religeous Weskers.



posted on Jun, 2 2006 @ 09:14 PM
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thanks bellzebubba.

that story sounds pretty cool as well. i am definatly going to have to read it.



posted on Jun, 3 2006 @ 06:36 AM
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Well... I thought there would be more responses to this thread. I for one do not wish to see it die as I am a great fan of short fiction.

Another favourite of mine is 'Eight O'Clock in the Morning' (1963) by Radell "Ray" Faraday Nelson. This story was the inspiration for John Carpenter's film 'They Live' (1988).

I have not read 'By the Waters of Babylon', it sounds interesting. I'll have to check it out.

[edit on 3-6-2006 by Beelzebubba]



posted on Jun, 4 2006 @ 08:57 PM
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another few really good ones are the cask of ammontialldo (sp?) and the fall of the house of usher. both of these are written by edgar all poe. he is one the greatseet writers of the short stories, even though he must have had a few loose screws.



posted on Jun, 4 2006 @ 09:34 PM
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Originally posted by unknown agent
another few really good ones are the cask of ammontialldo (sp?) and the fall of the house of usher. both of these are written by edgar all poe. he is one the greatseet writers of the short stories, even though he must have had a few loose screws.


I'm a huge Poe fan myself. Having read nearly all of his work, I have to say that the man was a genius. 'The Cask of Amontillado', 'Never Bet the Devil Your Head', 'The Black Cat', 'The Telltale Heart', and 'Mellonta Tauta' being amoung my favourites.

Have you heard 'Closed On Account Of Rabies'? It's a CD of Poe readings. This Link has audio of Christopher Walken Reading 'The Raven'. Others on the CD are: Iggy Pop, Gabriel Byrne, Deborah Harry, Marianne Faithfull, Jeff Buckley, Dr. John, Ed Sanders, Diamanda Galás does a haunting rendition of 'The Black Cat'.



"With tomahawk raised for deadly blow, behold our literary Mohawk...Poe!"



posted on Jun, 6 2006 @ 09:18 PM
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no i haven't heard of the cd, but it sounds pretty cool. the Christopher Walken reading i have heard before though. he is quite good at that, very creepy sounding at times.

i just read the sniper earlier today, it is about a snipe during the irish revolution, having a showdown with another sniper. not the greatest, and very short even for short story, but i would still have to recommened it.

i was also wondering about any orson scott card work, i have heard it is very good but have never read any myself



posted on Jun, 8 2006 @ 11:54 PM
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I'm not familiar with Mr. Card.

May I recommend Mr. Harry Crews for you to read?

Crews has written a few short stories: "Becky Lives", "No Noise in the Wood", "The Player Piano", "A Long Wail", "It Reminds One of the Opera", "The Unattached Smile".

Crews also writes novels and non-fiction.

His novel "The Hawk Is Dying" was recently released as a film starring Paul Giamatti. Another novel of his is currently in the works; "The Gypsy's Curse".
Apparently Johnny Depp, Harvey Keitel, and Vanessa Paradis are to star.

Crews has deserved recognition for many years and some may finally be coming his way. Let's hope he lives to see it.

Harry Crews: A Large & Startling Figure

[edit on 8-6-2006 by Beelzebubba]



posted on Jun, 9 2006 @ 02:06 AM
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Unknown agent - great Post.

My favourite short story writer is Jorge Luis Borges. He deals with issues such as time, space, numbers and metaphyics. A thinking man's writer - he can be a bit cerebral, but don't let that put you off, his stories are very well crafted and original. He was inspired by Poe, HG Wells and Lovecraft among others.

Recently I read a story that knocked me out - 'Bullet in the Brain' by Tobias Wolff. I heartily recommend it.

'How to Breathe Underwater' by Julie Orringer is another recent collection I really liked.

For classics I would include Flannery O' Connor and Faulkner (Rose for Emily). I love the southern writers as they deal with the complex issues of race, gender and religion. O'Connor especially has the most perfectly written stories that tackle morality and faith. Complete short stories has all of her best - too many to mention. Ok - I'll mention one - 'Good man is hard to find'.






[edit on 9-6-2006 by nikelbee]



posted on Jun, 9 2006 @ 02:26 AM
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Originally posted by nikelbee
For classics I would include Flannery O' Connor


Flannery O'Connor was one of the great American literary voices. To truly appreciate her mastery of her craft "The Violent Bear it Away" is a must, but I digress... short stories not novels.

"A Good Man is Hard to Find" and "Everything That Rises Must Converge", two great collections of short literature.

nikelbee, are you a reader of Harry Crews?

He writes in the tradition of O'Connor and Faulkner, carrying on the Southern Gothic tradition and the obsession with freaks.



posted on Jun, 10 2006 @ 09:16 AM
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This short story by Eudora Welty is one of my favorites. Yes, the popular Eudora e-mail software was named after this writer, with her permission, as a tribute to this short story. (P.O. being an abbreviation of Post Office)

Her entire bibliography (list of her writings) is available at:

www.eudorawelty.org...

Many U.S. Southern writers were dismissed by the writing establishment, but Eudora Welty and William Faulkner were two 20th century literary giants who survived anyway.



posted on Jun, 10 2006 @ 10:57 AM
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Future Liberarian

I'm not sure if I completely agree. The south has produced some of the finest 20th century literary writers; well respected novelists and contemporary short fiction authors in any writing establishment.

To name a few: Mark Twain, Truman Copote, Harper Lee, Carson McCullers, Faulkner, O'Connor and Eudora Welty.

I do however see your point as there is a perception that all good writers automatically hail from the east.
To be honest I would apply this short sightedness to writers from the west coast and the midwest as well.


In addition to 20th century Americans, my favourites are the Russians (Chekhov, Pushkin, Gogol) and Latin Americans (Borges, Cortazar, Marquez, Dario and Vargas LLosa). Somehow they inately understand the concise nature of the short story form as well as the ability to make magical any series of miserable and tragic events.

Lest I come off sounding unbearably pretentious - I really enjoy great tales that keep you intrigued as well as make you think. Gogol in particular is one of my all time favourites, combining politics, irony, history, humour and tragedy - but on the surface his stories are highly readable and you don't have to wade knee high in symbolism if you don't want.

I love all of Diary of a Madman
And if I'm forced to choose two faves: The Nose and The Overcoat.

Brilliant, brilliant. brilliant!



posted on Jun, 26 2006 @ 10:55 PM
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I just started reading Joyce Carol Oates and she's amazing. Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been? will leave you feeling like you just swallowed a spider.

Also, I haven't gotten my hands on it yet but there's a collection called "100 Jolts: Shockingly Short Stories"...if anyone's read it lemme know what you think!



posted on Jul, 15 2006 @ 10:32 AM
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I know this thread's about a month old, but I figured I'd toss my hat in here also.

Poe is a definite classic--The Premature Burial still gives me the chills, and I haven't even read it in years. He also wrote some fairly humorous comedies, but 19th century humour is a little hard to relate to sometimes--you can tell it's supposed to be funny, we just don't think like that much anymore.

Another one I loved was a Ray Bradbury (I believe) short about time travel vacations. I can't think of the name of it, but you'd pay to go on a safari in the past--hunting dinosaurs, etc. Had a neat twist that I don't want to give away; I'd appreciate it if anyone can throw the name out for that one.

I'm surprised no one threw Sherlock Holmes out--aside from Poe starting the genre out, you really can't get much more classic mystery than that.

Anyways, just thought I'd throw those in the ring.



posted on Aug, 11 2006 @ 01:35 AM
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Originally posted by MCory1
Another one I loved was a Ray Bradbury (I believe) short about time travel vacations. I can't think of the name of it, but you'd pay to go on a safari in the past--hunting dinosaurs, etc. Had a neat twist that I don't want to give away; I'd appreciate it if anyone can throw the name out for that one.


Had to look it up, but it's Ray Bradbury's 'The Sound of Thunder'.. awesome twist ending!

My all-time favorite short story author is Richard Christian Matheson.. He's got a short story collection out, which I'd recommend.. well, to those who don't mind a bit of gore. My favorite-est short story of his is entitled 'Red'.. found in the Splatterpunks collection (edited by Robert Bloch). Yes, it's a bit gorey, but dang the story punched the air right out of me!!!



posted on Aug, 11 2006 @ 07:46 AM
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Thanks Diseria--I really appreciate that. Haven't read it in years. Even found a copy of it online for anyone who's wanting a read (fairly short, probably be about 4-5 pages printed up.)

A Sound of Thunder - Ray Bradbury

Thanks again!



posted on Sep, 7 2006 @ 09:15 PM
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I have always leaned toward the horror and sci-fi short story form, although I have read many,many literary short stories, I seem to come back time and again to my favorite short story writers. These include, Poe, Bradbury, King, Heinlein and Clarke. May I recommend several stories from these masters?

"The gold bug" by Poe
"The unpleasant profession of Jonathan Hoag", by Robert Heinlein
"The nine billion names of god" by Arthur C Clarke
" A boy and his dog", by Harlan Ellison

My all-time favorite short story(which is actually a novela)is"The unpleasant profession of Jonathan Hoag" by Heinlein. If you have never read it, it is definitely worth your time.



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