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Tissue Manipulation?

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posted on May, 31 2006 @ 03:43 PM
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What device, or scientific technology, could be used to manipula tissue in excess of 50/100 yards? When I say manipulation, I'm refering to when your muscle "twitches" or simply a sort of "pulling". Also, what is the theory behind such? Is it in the form of light spectrum? Magnetic? And, what could be used to divert such waves.

The wave is as percise as a half dollar, and algorithmes that can track at up to 40 MPH at excess of 50 yards.

Thanks.

Dago

[edit on 31-5-2006 by Dago]




posted on May, 31 2006 @ 04:34 PM
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I uhh...I can't uhh....what?

Are you quizzing us, or asking us if there is such an object. The last statment makes me lean towards the former, but, I'll try to go for both of the possibilities.

There is no technology that can move your muscle tissue twitch, pull, stretch, or otherwise spaz out. Magnetism will not do it, have you ever heard of an MRI? These fields are on the scale of thousands of times more powerful than the Earth's magnetic field, with nary a twitch from the human body. Also, light is unable to produce a direct effect on human muscular systems. However, bright flashing lights will induce seizures in those susceptible to it, and I remember reading about a flashing laser light used to stun inhabitants of a building during nighttime operations by Military/SWAT members.

There are two ideas I can think of immediately. One is the newfangled active-denial systems that the military is pushing through R&D. These come in the form of microwave dishes that, when fired up, will cause intense heat and pain for the target, who will assuredly do his/her best to escape the beam. It's called non-lethal, but it sounds like a heckuva Cancer Gun. Another version of ADS is a directed sound weapon, which emits a high-pitched and painful sound, causing the target to flee.

What may interest you, is this thread:
www.abovetopsecret.com...
It concerns crowd control using Electromagnetic waves. It's the closest I could find for you. We really have no capability for, say, making someones arm rise or legs leap out from under them from a football field away. If you're interested in these active denial systems, I suggest you scope out the Weaponry Forum (Edit: No pun intended
)

[edit on 31-5-2006 by TheGoodDoctorFunk]



posted on May, 31 2006 @ 09:11 PM
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I was under the impression that electromagnetic radiation could be directed in the form of directed energy where it could potentially manipulate tissues. It's entirely possible that a form of energy is capable of manipulating tissue and pulling such...however, the output would be out of this world at 50/100 yrds. Nonetheless, it exists, in the size of the back of a car.



posted on May, 31 2006 @ 09:24 PM
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Originally posted by TheGoodDoctorFunk
There is no technology that can move your muscle tissue twitch, pull, stretch, or otherwise spaz out. Magnetism will not do it, have you ever heard of an MRI? These fields are on the scale of thousands of times more powerful than the Earth's magnetic field, with nary a twitch from the human body.


Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) is a risk with high field (1.5 Tesla or greater) MRI's.

www.revisemri.com...

But this can only occur within the confines of the imaging volume (typically a 450 mm sphere in the middle of the magnet), and then only with certain imaging techniques. There is no currently known technology that could project those forces even the shortest of distances, much less 50-100 meters.



posted on Jun, 1 2006 @ 03:50 PM
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I didn't know about PNS before now, thanks for bringing it up
. I was only aware of the MRI risk inherent with Pacemakers and metal plates/screws. It's not pretty. From what I took from your source, it seems that Cardiac and Respiratory muscles are at highest risk, followed by Skeletal Muscles, and then Peripheral nerves. As you pointed out, it takes a considerable output of energy for this to occur at close range, in an enclosed tube.

Conservatively, my guess estimate is that it would take somewhere between a buttload and whole heck of a lot of energy to "shoot" someone at 50-100 yards with these effects. Even so, you'd be more likely to give them a heart attack than have them punch themselves in the . while you yell "Hey, stop doing that to yourself! Stop doing that to yourself!"



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