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The FBI Found a New Use for Your DNA

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posted on May, 30 2006 @ 11:36 PM
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In what is being billed as a pair of new uses for an old tool, the FBI is going to start using its database of DNA for something other than catching criminals. The database, complete with a new software element, will be used to identify bodies and missing people through comparison of DNA to available samples, either those already in the database, or those provided to investigators by family members of missing people.
 



www.usatoday.com
The FBI plans to use its national DNA database system to help identify not only criminals, but also missing persons and tens of thousands of unidentified bodies held by local coroners and medical examiners.

A new computer program planned for this fall will compare genetic profiles taken from unidentified bodies or body parts with DNA submitted by family members of missing persons. The plan takes advantage of the fact that biological relatives sometimes have similar, though not identical, DNA profiles. The FBI will look for near-matches.

The FBI's initiative comes as other branches of the Justice Department are launching programs to identify thousands of murder, accident and other victims identified only as John or Jane Doe.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Well, smoke doesn't always mean fire, but it certainly qualifies as something worthy of investigation in my household. If I see smoke, I try to find out where it's coming from, and ascertain as quickly as possible whether or not I'm in any danger. Y'all do the same thing, I assume.

Well, this looks and smells like smoke to me. Say you reported your sister or your father or your cousin missing seven years ago, and the FBI comes to your door asking for a sample of your DNA to compare to every corpse in every county morgue, on the off chance they might find him/her and bring some sort of closure. You say no, for whatever reason. What now? Are you a suspect, subject to a court ordered de-blooding for the purpose of sample comparison?

There's no reason to shun technology, but there's a whole slew of very compelling reasons never to gift rampantly out of control governments with that sort of power.




posted on May, 31 2006 @ 01:48 AM
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DNA's easy to get. They wouldn't need to forcibly get it from you. All they'd have to do is have you sit down in the waiting room at the police station when you go in to give your statement about said missing person, and then collect the fallen skin cells when you leave. DNA falls off of you all of the time. It's practically everywhere. What do you think dust is?

TheBorg



posted on May, 31 2006 @ 06:22 AM
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all the points made are vallid, the one more thing. Thers is going to be a time when every persons DNA is stored in some federal data base some where. It has been building, and I see this as just one more step in that direction.



posted on May, 31 2006 @ 06:30 AM
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Why does everything this government does points to some Orwellian cause?

Will this all stop when Bush is out of the White HOuse? IF and when he leaves?

For Petes sakes, this is getting weirder and weirder every day. This sure has been
a ride we wont forget.
I expect they will want DNA, feces samples, urine, hair samples, fingerprints and your first born.
Oh, and of course, your television sets will be monitoring ya.



posted on May, 31 2006 @ 06:48 AM
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Well I dont know about the first born, maby when we beacome a slave state. But the nelson people have wanted to know how maby people are in the room when you are watching your TV for quite some time. I think they have tried to make that happen. Or so I have heard.



posted on May, 31 2006 @ 08:18 AM
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The Veteran's Administration has set a policy that DNA will be taken from all veterans when they register for medical services. The DNA is supposed to become part of a database to help medical researchers. I wonder how long before this database will be incorporated to the FBI's.

I am not against the use of DNA for solving crimes, as a matter of fact I voluntarily donated my DNA a few years ago to help resolve a local issue. I do not believe that the collection of DNA is some great plot by the government to assert control over the population.

My concern is a simple one. Mistakes happen. There is a term being used by Prosecutors now called "the CSI Effect". This is where the jury finds the Defendent innocent because the Prosecution didn't use any or enough high-tech evidence in their case. What I am worried about is the growing trend to take DNA evidence as absolute. When someone says that there is one chance in a million that someone else has the same DNA and you are looking at a database of a few thousand local people then odds are good that it is a correct match. If you are looking at a database of one hundred million people there is a chance of an incorrect match. Throw in database errors, computer errors and the other human fallicies and this could be a real problem. This National Database of DNA could actually degrade the accuracy of DNA matches and lead to innocent people being convicted of crimes.



posted on May, 31 2006 @ 08:40 AM
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Originally posted by JIMC5499


My concern is a simple one. Mistakes happen. There is a term being used by Prosecutors now called "the CSI Effect". This is where the jury finds the Defendent innocent because the Prosecution didn't use any or enough high-tech evidence in their case. What I am worried about is the growing trend to take DNA evidence as absolute. When someone says that there is one chance in a million that someone else has the same DNA and you are looking at a database of a few thousand local people then odds are good that it is a correct match. If you are looking at a database of one hundred million people there is a chance of an incorrect match. Throw in database errors, computer errors and the other human fallicies and this could be a real problem. This National Database of DNA could actually degrade the accuracy of DNA matches and lead to innocent people being convicted of crimes.


What I see as the biggest point you made hear is that mistakes happen. I am not quite as worried about police not useing enuff testing or equipment to solve a crime. I rember a case of some one being on death row who was latter reliced because of what was in my opinion the failer of the police to even want to do there job and invistage a crime in something close to a complete mannor. Multpical tests will help element human error.
And did not know that all vets have there DNA on file, though I did suspect.
so I guess I am in the data base now



posted on May, 31 2006 @ 08:47 AM
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Originally posted by RedGolem
And did not know that all vets have there DNA on file, though I did suspect.
so I guess I am in the data base now


Not all Vets. I think they started taking samples from Active Duty, Reserve and Guard in the late 90's. The VA's sampling is supposed to start later this year. That is only if you use the VA for medical care.



posted on May, 31 2006 @ 09:32 AM
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In Portugal a study is being done for approving a law of genetic database in 2007.

The study workgroup will present the proposal until the end of 2006, and will become law in 2007.

The Gov, said that, there will be a public discussion, about the subject, which i doubt it. People here are too blind to understand the future consequences, in my opinion.

The Gov. also said, quoting "The primary objective will be, to help criminal investigation and help on the identification of dead bodies"

The EU, too recomends member countries do adopt this solution, for fighting international criminality and terrorism.


First i don't give much credit in portuguese security to keep the data in a safe place, in Portugal, information leaks are frequent, and it's due to corruption, lobbies or incompetence (like trashing court documents in a public trash bin without proper care, it has happened)


In my own view i see, a future where banks, insurances and other economic groups, will get this genetic information and will apply taxes according to the genetic "risks" of the client. This will be the first step, money! Bigger risk will mean that you will pay more than others!

Next step, will be eugenics, and this will change our entire lifes for ever.

This is all about, genetic descrimination. Let the best gene win!



Crustas



posted on May, 31 2006 @ 05:00 PM
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crustas, you've definitely nailed my biggest concern, the possibility of this morphing into a tool for eugenics. The last thing we need is a genetic underclass, denied insurance and medical care and jobs and homes, even children, because of the content of their genes.

From the point of view of insurers and state medical authorities, it's about numbers, not people. That's how holocausts happen. We've already got sterilization programs in the states, we've had them for quite some time. It's only a matter of time before they're applied, in concert with the DNA database, to restrict breeding to certain groups deemed 'clear' by the medical authorities.

It makes perfect sense, to me at least, to prevent closely-related people from breeding through testing regimens, thereby reducing the proliferation of inbreeding-related genetic disorders. But take that one step farther, and preclude breeding between people with coding for _____ (pick a condition, or a bunch of conditions), and that's edging on a creepy Gattaca style society

DNA is a great diagnostic tool, but it's ridiculous to think of such power in the hands of this corporately co-opted government. The potential for abuse far outweighs the possible benefit at this point, or so it seems to me.


[edit on 31-5-2006 by WyrdeOne]



posted on May, 31 2006 @ 05:10 PM
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Originally posted by JIMC5499

Originally posted by RedGolem
And did not know that all vets have there DNA on file, though I did suspect.
so I guess I am in the data base now


Not all Vets. I think they started taking samples from Active Duty, Reserve and Guard in the late 90's. The VA's sampling is supposed to start later this year. That is only if you use the VA for medical care.


Ok so I guess im not in the system. Although they still have my records so I guess they can put me in the system if they decide they want to.

[edit on 31-5-2006 by RedGolem]



posted on May, 31 2006 @ 05:18 PM
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Originally posted by WyrdeOne
Are you a suspect, subject to a court ordered de-blooding for the purpose of sample comparison?


Although I did find "de-blooding" to be rather funny, the proper term for the act of withdrawing blood from a body is phlebotomy. A phlebotomy is performed by a phlebotomist. Just one of those weird facts that you learn and your not really sure why or how but it's fun to pass along.

I'm still on the fence about a DNA database being a sinister thing. It could be used for both good and evil purposes.



posted on May, 31 2006 @ 08:21 PM
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Originally posted by dgtempe
Why does everything this government does points to some Orwellian cause?

Will this all stop when Bush is out of the White HOuse? IF and when he leaves?

...I expect they will want DNA, feces samples, urine, hair samples, fingerprints and your first born.


Because you want it to, like everything in the world revolves around Bush. I’m sure if you had been around when fingerprint identification was first being used and Bush was in office you would have been preaching the same line, because one man prevents you from thinking of anything other than , the sky is falling, police state, run for your lives. Yet how many cases has fingerprint identification help solve? Everything can be misused and flawed, but instead of attacking it as soon as its mentioned lets investigate its possible rewards and figure out ways we can prevent it from being misused.


[edit on 31-5-2006 by WestPoint23]



posted on Jun, 1 2006 @ 04:09 AM
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WestPoint, I don't want to burst your bubble, but I have no choice.


Fingerprint Identification Flawed

As to the other part of what you said, I agree that we shouldn't shun technology just because it could be used maliciously. If we did that, we'd have nothing. But we do need to safeguard against abuses of power, and until those protective measures are in place I don't think the government should be given such a big responsibility.

deadboi
Believe it or not, I actually knew that. It's never sounded right to me though, it seems like it has something to do with phlegm, as opposed to blood. I don't know, de-blooding just sounds better to me. Thanks for posting that though, at least people interested in the correct terminology have it now, and they don't have to rely on my 'interpretive' English.



posted on Jun, 1 2006 @ 11:06 AM
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Well, nothing is perfect, or 100% right. However I think Fingerprint Identification has been a useful means of identifying people and has helped more than harmed. If things can be improved to make FI more effective and reliable, I’m all for it.




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