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Indian Aircraft Black Project?

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posted on Jun, 2 2006 @ 09:48 PM
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....This is a joke, right?...
(looks more like a can opener)


[edit on 3-6-2006 by TSR2005]




posted on Jun, 8 2006 @ 05:01 PM
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Definitely fantasy and nothing more. I know person who made this page: www.stavatti.com

Note: Originally it was Stavatti F-26 Stalma with "expected first flight" in 2004. Now it was renamed as SM-36 with first flight in 2007. I am wondering how he will name this plane in 2007



posted on Jun, 11 2006 @ 05:27 PM
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Is it just me, or does this look like somones wet dream designed on X-Plane (Awesome program BTW)? Check out the X-plane community if you want to see the best amature CG models out there. ( www.x-plane.org... )


ISJ

posted on Jun, 13 2006 @ 06:32 AM
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Dont knock the person who designed and modelled that, it is impressive but lookng closely it is flawed.

There is a whole community of 3D solid modelling users out there who love to create virtual models of anything
and everything.

If creator "sold" it to others as a definative aircraft concept with a likely flight date then,
he does deserve what he gets but i assume he's just modelled it for fun then somebody else has got hold of it
and claimed it was a new design.

Just my 2 cents worth



posted on Jun, 13 2006 @ 07:08 AM
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Originally posted by mikesingh
This is actually an SM-36 STALMA, a sixth generation Multi-Role Fighter suitable for Direct Commercial Sale to US and NATO/allies.


Sale to the US? This is intresting, I've never heard this before. Usually the US doesn't buy aircraft from other countries. The only foreign aircraft in the US invintory right now that I'm aware of is the Harrier.

I'm surprise that a foreign company would invest a large amount of money to create a plane to market to the US, when America almost never buys foreign military aircraft! Strange indeed!

Tim


ISJ

posted on Jun, 13 2006 @ 07:10 AM
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Originally posted by ghost
The only foreign aircraft in the US invintory right now that I'm aware of is the Harrier.



And even that had to be re-engineered in co-operation with Macdonald Douglas before the $$$$$ were handed over!



posted on Jun, 13 2006 @ 09:49 AM
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Originally posted by ISJ

Originally posted by ghost
The only foreign aircraft in the US invintory right now that I'm aware of is the Harrier.



And even that had to be re-engineered in co-operation with Macdonald Douglas before the $$$$$ were handed over!


don't want to go off topic but you are both a little mistaken.

The Harrier was accepted for service by the USMC direct from the factory of Hawker Siddely in 1971, unmodified, as the AV-8A, moves to upgrade the Harrier were done by the UK and US together FROM 1972-75(AV-16) and the AV-8B was the cut price result of the UK backing out of this programme, if anything, AV-8B was further modified for acceptance by the RAF with the introduction of the LERX for enhanced instananeous turn rate and an 8 pylon wing in place of the US 6 pylon wing. So the smugness in that comment is unwarranted.

Other 'foreign' types in US service (or on the cusp of it) include the T-45, VH-71, C-23 and C-27J, I'm not sure if the Slingsby T-67M Firefly is still used by the USAF.



posted on Jun, 13 2006 @ 10:27 AM
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Originally posted by waynos
don't want to go off topic but you are both a little mistaken.
< SNIP>
Other 'foreign' types in US service (or on the cusp of it) include the T-45, VH-71, C-23 and C-27J, I'm not sure if the Slingsby T-67M Firefly is still used by the USAF.


I know the Harrier story!

You're telling me that the fallowing are all foriegn made: T-45, VH-71, C-23, and C-27J?

Well, I had no idea we had so many. See, you learn something new everyday!

Tim

[edit on 13-6-2006 by ghost]

[edit on 13-6-2006 by ghost]



posted on Jun, 13 2006 @ 01:04 PM
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I know the Harrier story!


That brief summary was for ISJ's benefit.

The 'other types' were for you.

They may not be entirely foreign made, but they are all of foreign origin with a large amount of foreign content, partnerships with Boeing (AV-8B, T-45) and Lockheed (VH-71, C-27J) make such purchases more politically acceptable to the US. I get the impression from what ISJ said that he thinks US industrial involvement is necessary to get them working properly?

As far as I recall the only purchases made directly from overseas manufacturers without US participation are the AV-8A Harrier, Short Sherpa (the military 330) and the Slingsby Firefly.

edit, re reading ISJ's post I think he may have been having a dig at the US more than the Harrier.

[edit on 13-6-2006 by waynos]



posted on Jun, 13 2006 @ 01:27 PM
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Yes, my favorite part of this joke was the part about the plane being designed for sale to the U.S. and NATO.


Why would the West ever take a step backwards to buy military hardware when the rest of the world seems to be struggling so mightily to catch up to U.S. and other Western country's designs?



posted on Jun, 13 2006 @ 01:38 PM
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If creator "sold" it to others as a definative aircraft concept with a likely flight date then,


I think everyone is misunderstanding this phrase. It doesn't mean 'sold' as in actually selling planes to an air force, he means if the person who created the design tried to pass it off as real to the rest of us rather than admitting it was just a fantasy.

This is the only reference to 'selling' this design I can recall.



posted on Jun, 13 2006 @ 01:53 PM
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Originally posted by waynos


I know the Harrier story!


That brief summary was for ISJ's benefit.

The 'other types' were for you.

They may not be entirely foreign made, but they are all of foreign origin with a large amount of foreign content, partnerships with Boeing (AV-8B, T-45) and Lockheed (VH-71, C-27J) make such purchases more politically acceptable to the US. I get the impression from what ISJ said that he thinks US industrial involvement is necessary to get them working properly?

As far as I recall the only purchases made directly from overseas manufacturers without US participation are the AV-8A Harrier, Short Sherpa (the military 330) and the Slingsby Firefly.

edit, re reading ISJ's post I think he may have been having a dig at the US more than the Harrier.

[edit on 13-6-2006 by waynos]



Waynos Dont forget one of the real Classic's of the air, The Canberra which they bought and renamed the B-57. Later modified by the US into a tandam seat layout+ other mods:



posted on Jun, 13 2006 @ 04:19 PM
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I did think of that, thanks, but I took tims comment to refer to current types
Although its unrelated I will also take this opportunity to point out that Britain broke into the domestic US airliner market long before Airbus came along by virtue of the Viscount and BAC One Eleven ("not to be written 1-11 or 111", so said George Edwards )


The Viscount, NOT the Comet, was a the first gas turbine powered commercial aircraft in service in the world, it led Lockheed to launch the Electra, similarly, stung by the success in its home market of the British One Eleven, Douglas created the DC-9, fact fans


[edit on 13-6-2006 by waynos]



posted on Jun, 26 2006 @ 01:59 PM
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woah . . woah . . im sure lotsa $$$$ went into making this site . . . . . . this guy has taken care of everything . . . check out the details .. the prices . .and availability section . . .what was he thinking . . . ? ? ?

. . and hey india has nothing to do with this . . . . this aint no indian black project . . . its a build up for the new ace combat game title . . . man . those games feature some neat planes . . . (electrosphere - playstation one)



posted on Jun, 30 2006 @ 04:56 AM
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Originally posted by waynos
the domestic US airliner market long before Airbus came along by virtue of the Viscount and BAC One Eleven ("not to be written 1-11 or 111", so said George Edwards )


[edit on 13-6-2006 by waynos]


Excuse me for asking, but what is a BAC 111? I'm not much into airliners.

Tim



posted on Jun, 30 2006 @ 01:43 PM
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The BAC One Eleven was the first small short haul turbofan airliner and was intended to be the jet replacement for the Viscount, It was created as the Hunting 107 but was inherited by BAC when that company was formed out of the mergers of Vickers, Hunting, English Electric and Bristol in 1960 to build the TSR 2.

It first flew in late 1963 and entered service with British United in April 1965, it went into service with its first US operator, Braniff, in the same month. The series 400 was created especially for American Airlines and, until the BAe 146 beat it, it was the most successful British Jetliner. The success of the One Eleven led not only to the DC-9 being created but also the 737 as the US industry decided it wasn't letting the little limey mop up all the sales
. Its own sales though were hampered by BAC not launching the stretched 99 seat series 500 soon enough and the US competition had overhauled it by the time BAC saw the light. Only 230 were built, but bear in mind that not only was the airliner market a fraction then of what it is now (it is less than the 787 has sold already for instance) but also this compares to only 59 VC-10's and even fewer Vanguards (which is generally par for the course for UK airliners) so, for the UK this was a success.

BAC One Eleven 400



BAC One Eleven 500




[edit on 30-6-2006 by waynos]



posted on Jun, 30 2006 @ 02:30 PM
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it turns out stavatti is american . . . ( so much for italian name . . )



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