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250 Stranded in WWII Bomb Alert - Liverpool, UK

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posted on May, 16 2006 @ 10:23 AM
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A powerful bomb from the WWII was just found and it stranded 250 passengers on ferries near the Port of Liverpool. They are now moving the bomb out to safer waters in order to detonate it. They say the bomb was one of the most powerful and destructive dropped by the Germans during WWII


BBC: Ferries caught in WWII bomb alert

About 250 passengers and crew were stranded on ferries after a bomb was discovered in the River Mersey. The 500kg (1,102lb) World War II explosive was found by the Royal Navy at Twelve Quays dock, Birkenhead.

Navy divers are moving the 7ft (2.1m) German penetration bomb out to deeper waters in the Irish Sea to detonate it.

Commander Chris Davies, from the Royal Navy, told the BBC that the bomb was a German air-drop explosive. He said: "It would cause a significant blast if it detonated. "The measures that we have put in place with Merseyside Police and the Liverpool port authorities ensure public safety and the remainder of the operation is to minimise disruption to the city and the Port of Liverpool.

Royal Navy spokesman Neil Smith said the bomb was "one of the most powerful and destructive" bombs dropped on the city during WWII. "The Germans dropped this bomb to try and destroy the dockside in Liverpool," he said.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.

Has this bomb really been there for so many years? Wow, it could have exploded any time...




posted on May, 16 2006 @ 02:29 PM
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That's crazy, but every few years you hear of something like this happening. Either it's a bomb or a rediscovered mine field, most of the time. There was that one time the Japanese guy on an island still thought WWII was going on though, and that was well after the war. He had been stranded from his group and just kept on a look out!

Anyway, it's great that they discovered this without any loss of life or anything. It could have been a lot worse. Hopefully the move and detonation go well.



posted on May, 16 2006 @ 08:26 PM
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The bomb has been detonated safely. They say the reason it has been undetected for so long is because it was a penetration bomb.


BBC: Mersey bomb detonated in the sea



A 500kg (1,102lb) World War II bomb found in the River Mersey has been detonated in a controlled explosion.

Navy divers moved the 2.1m (7ft) German penetration bomb out to deeper waters in the Irish Sea to detonate it safely at about 2100 BST.

Royal Navy spokesman Neil Smith said the device may have lain undetected for so long because penetration bombs are designed to embed into a target before exploding.

He said: "This is only speculation, but if the bomb landed on the river bed it may have buried itself and only recently been uncovered by recent high tides, for example.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.



posted on May, 16 2006 @ 10:18 PM
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Glad to hear it was detonated without incident.


How deep into the water was it? Who discovered it and recognized it as an old bomb?

[edit on 5/16/2006 by cmdrkeenkid]



posted on May, 16 2006 @ 10:56 PM
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The bomb was found on the riverbed by the Royal Navy minesweeper HMS Atherstone. It was a PC 500 delay-fused bomb. The 150 passengers and 100 crew on the Mersey Viking and the Dublin Viking arrived in port 6 hours late.


Times Online: Luftwaffe brings Mersey to a halt


The controlled explosion was conducted late last night, sending spray nearly 200ft (60m) into the air, and making a noise that could be heard more than 15 miles away. The bomb, which was 7ft long and just over 2ft wide, was found on the riverbed near the Twelve Quays ferry terminal, at Birkenhead, by the Royal Navy minesweeper HMS Atherstone, which had been carrying out a routine harbour survey.

The delay-fused bomb, known as a PC 500, is thought to have been exposed by recent dredging work. It was found close to Morpeth Dock, a target for the Luftwaffe in 1940-41. Police immediately imposed an exclusion zone around the bomb, which was lifted from the seabed with a flotation bag. At low tide it was raised to within 10ft of the surface and towed out to sea to a point marked by a buoy.

The Mersey Viking and the Dublin Viking finally arrived in port yesterday afternoon, about six hours late.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.



posted on May, 16 2006 @ 11:05 PM
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The delay-fused bomb, known as a PC 500, is thought to have been exposed by recent dredging work.


Wow! Imagine what would have happened had the dredger hit the bomb. It's great that this thing was found, but it does raise the question of, "Are there more?"

Is there going to be any further investigation into the area?



posted on May, 17 2006 @ 07:49 AM
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Originally posted by cmdrkeenkid

The delay-fused bomb, known as a PC 500, is thought to have been exposed by recent dredging work.


Wow! Imagine what would have happened had the dredger hit the bomb. It's great that this thing was found, but it does raise the question of, "Are there more?"

Is there going to be any further investigation into the area?


Oh god, yes, they're always digging the damn things up. According to my mother there have even been the odd bomb discovered in Epping Forest, to the north of London and close to where some of the big diversionary fires were set during the war. I didn't believe her at first until about a year and a half ago, when I was walking the dog. Got to a large open space and then saw this string of holes in the ground - quite large ones, they must have been about 10-15 feet across. Quite old too. Bomb craters!
I think I remember one being found under a gasworks a few years ago. Quite a few pale faces over that one, lol! :w:



posted on May, 17 2006 @ 08:21 AM
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Originally posted by cmdrkeenkid

The delay-fused bomb, known as a PC 500, is thought to have been exposed by recent dredging work.


Wow! Imagine what would have happened had the dredger hit the bomb. It's great that this thing was found, but it does raise the question of, "Are there more?"

Is there going to be any further investigation into the area?


It's not surprising really. Remember that during the war Britain's major cities were getting bombed night after night. In London alone they estimate 43,000 civilians died and a million houses were destroyed during 'The Blitz', an 8 month period between September 1940 and May 1941....that's a lot of bombs.

One estimate I read was that 1 in 20 German bombs failed to explode. Most of those were dealt with by bomb dispoal units at the time, but with huge chunks of the cities turned to rubble, quite a few ended up buried deep beneath the ground, only to be rediscovered in modern times when building work is taking place. A lot of the bombing raids targeted ports and dock areas, such as Liverpool, so there's probably quite a few more unexploded bombs buried deep under the riverbeds of Britain's cities.

When they find these things they don't investigate the area any further, they just remove the bomb causing the problem and blow it up. You'd have to lift the whole city off the ground and dig beneath every road and building to find every unexploded bomb, so they just deal with them as they find them.



posted on May, 17 2006 @ 08:45 AM
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I am from Liverpool and seen it all first hand yesterday on my way home from the Airport. It was exciting lol.

we descover a few of these every year, nothing really majour.

I must congratulate the RN on a swift and good job.




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