It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Are all Element Isotopes Identical within their Category?

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 15 2006 @ 08:09 PM
link   
Since hydrogen and its isotopes partly created our lives and partly sustains our lives, does it remain pure by itself, pure in combination with other element isotopes, impure by itself, and/or impure in combination with other element isotopes?

I have heard that the conservation of matter is violated in certain conditions. As such, we can have the right element isotope composition for a permanent life on Earth, but our elements are degrading or disappearing. What is this "degrading" factor? Which particles substitute in space-time for this "degrading" factor?




posted on May, 15 2006 @ 10:28 PM
link   

Originally posted by GreatTech
Since hydrogen and its isotopes partly created our lives and partly sustains our lives, does it remain pure by itself, pure in combination with other element isotopes, impure by itself, and/or impure in combination with other element isotopes?

I have heard that the conservation of matter is violated in certain conditions. As such, we can have the right element isotope composition for a permanent life on Earth, but our elements are degrading or disappearing. What is this "degrading" factor? Which particles substitute in space-time for this "degrading" factor?


Now, keep in mind I was an organic and biochemist in college, not a physical chemist, but we did work often with isotopes. Isotopes, in and of themselves, are not the same; they have a difference typically of just a few neutrons creating a heavier or lighter atom with different reactive properties. As such, some isotopes of elements will NOT be incorporated into your system due to those differences in reactive properties. Some isotopes are close enough (P-34 and P-35) and will be able to be used in proteins.

For the most part, the original post seems like pseudo-science drivel. Our elements are not "degrading or disappearing", and there is no "degrading factor". Anytime an atom degrades, it can only occur through radiation, which is the expulsion of a subatomic particle. This only occurs in radioactive elements in nature, and will NOT occur if the element is bound in larger molecule, as is the case 90% of the time in nature. Rarely will you find deposits of any pure element. It is typically found either in some sort of ionic network in the case of some metals, or in a binary compound.

MFP



posted on May, 15 2006 @ 11:33 PM
link   
bsl4doc, have you disproven the disproof of the conservation of matter? Did you read this, or was the information given to you?

Maybe you will be the first person in the world to completely solve anti-aging?



posted on May, 16 2006 @ 12:14 AM
link   
I have never heard of any case in which the conservation of mass being disproved. There was one case where some physicists THOUGHT they had shown a particle appearing out of nothing. I can't remember the name of the particle, but I do remember that it is so rare, that should you set up a detecting apparatus for them, you would only statistically see one every few years. This particle, however, was later quantized as a unit of time, I believe. I'm DEFINITELY not a physicist, so you may need to do a little research into this on your own. However, as I said before, there is no degradation of elements occuring in your body, excep tby natural low-grade radiation which does not degrade elements in appreciable amounts.

MFP



posted on May, 18 2006 @ 11:16 PM
link   
Well to answer the first question, no isotopes are very different for one another.

As far as conservation of mass it’s a interesting subject because in nuclear reactions some mass is converted in to energy this is clearly a defiance of the concervation …though other than nuclear reaction we have not found a problem with it.



posted on May, 18 2006 @ 11:58 PM
link   

As far as conservation of mass it’s a interesting subject because in nuclear reactions some mass is converted in to energy this is clearly a defiance of the concervation …though other than nuclear reaction we have not found a problem with it.


This is NOT in defiance of the conservation laws. Energy has quantifiably mass, volume, etc. However, energetic particles generated in a nuclear reaction are very small, thus the LARGE amount of energy created in a nuclear reaction involving only a few atoms. Their small size is made up for by release tons of energy, thus retaining the same amounts of mass, matter, kinetic/potential energy.

MFP



new topics

top topics
 
0

log in

join