"Broadband Over Power Line" and "Amateur Radio"

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posted on Oct, 18 2003 @ 01:03 PM
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this has been going on for awhile...im surprised that this hasnt been mentioned on the board before,considering the effects this would have on shortwave reception in the U.S...is it another step towards censorship of "alternative" news sources by the FCC?...

here is a web page explaining it all....


This web page or CD contains files and links of information about BPL and related broadband technologies and how they may adversely affect Amateur Radio and other HF radio operation. BPL is also sometimes called Power-line Communications or PLC. This represents the technical work of many of the International Amateur Radio Union (www.iaru.org...) Amateur Radio societies. Amateur Radio is a valuable, licensed radio Service that provides important communication in times of emergency. Amateur Radio organizations naturally want to protect Amateur Radio from harmful interference, but they expect that dialogue and communication are valuable tools to mitigate interference and to find common ground to resolve problems.


[Edited on 18-10-2003 by Creepy]




posted on Oct, 18 2003 @ 01:06 PM
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Broadband over power lines is the future, its cheap and has been rolled out in rural area's of scotland.
35.99 a month for 2mb down sounds like a good deal.



posted on Oct, 18 2003 @ 01:10 PM
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read this article...


What is the driving force behind the idea of delivering Broadband over Power Lines (BPL)? Who needs it?

Not consumers. Most already have access to broadband service (if they want it) via DSL, cable modems, wireless local area networks and satellites. They are not clamoring for more choices. Consumers might like lower prices, but no one is offering any guarantees on behalf of BPL in that regard.

According to the International Telecommunication Union, DSL is the most common broadband platform in the world today and is growing rapidly. Cable modems are popular in economies with developed cable TV networks.

As for future growth, the ITU says: "The cost of installing the fiber optic cables previously made it prohibitive for connecting small communities or homes, but prices have fallen to the point that in several economies, users can now connect to the Internet via fiber optic cable at speeds 20 times greater than the fastest DSL and cable modem connections. Several governments are gradually laying fiber infrastructure to have it ready when it finally becomes cost effective to install the connections and 'light up' fiber to the home."




[Edited on 18-10-2003 by Creepy]



posted on Oct, 19 2003 @ 12:54 PM
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there was a test program with this technology in the dutch town of Arnhem if I am correct. And they quited the program because it was still to expancive to run





 
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