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Are Engineers Clairvoyant?

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posted on May, 9 2006 @ 12:26 AM
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More so than mathematicians, physicists, chemists, and biologists? I think they are. Looking through the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office designs sort of blows me away. Looking at the intricacy of the design of many machines sort of blows me away. Was it their genetics, environment, and/or diet?




posted on May, 9 2006 @ 09:22 AM
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Many people believe that the longer you breastfeed a child, the smarter they'll be. Maybe engineers just got breastfed for a very long time. After that I'd say it's a mix of all three things you mention. They were predispositioned to be smarter in general and with analytical thinking. Add on top of that proper diet and being brought up in an environment that encouraged education, and I'd say that would essentially be the reason.

I don't think you can classify an entire group of workers as one thing. I know most engineers probably don't believe in psychic powers and would laugh in your face. Although some of the craziest and most groundbreaking ideas in our history have come to people through dreams.



posted on May, 9 2006 @ 09:38 AM
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It's a secret!


Lots of engineers get creative help.

The interesting part of that is listening to their own impressions of the creative process... It exposes the different degrees of awareness of these VERY different type people to the stream of knowledge coming their way.

For those of you who like history... Ask yourself what the odds are that so many inventors were working on the same inventions at approximately the same time at various places around the world...

It happened/happens a lot.



posted on May, 9 2006 @ 03:04 PM
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The USA has the best engineers in the World. I am still amazed of all the technology out there.

Frequently, I believe that engineers do not get enough credit for the work they do. The fact that there is no Nobel Prize for engineering has always been a curiousity of mine. Maybe engineers do not lobby enough; many probably take a higher path of believing that life is not about winning a prize.

There is the National Inventors Hall of Fame. Frequently, I believe these famous inventors did more than Nobelists. How did Edison, the Wright brothers... not win a Nobel Prize?



posted on May, 9 2006 @ 03:38 PM
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Im a mechanical engineer, yet not a clairvoyant (I think). I think more rationally than my friends which helps alot with solving problems and what not.

However Im not the super genious inventor type.

[edit on 9-5-2006 by KidOK]



posted on May, 9 2006 @ 03:55 PM
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Originally posted by GreatTech
More so than mathematicians, physicists, chemists, and biologists? I think they are.


What do you mean by "Clairvoyant"?



Looking through the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office designs sort of blows me away.


Well, mathemeticians can't file patents on their equations. Biologists can't patent a new species or a new structure discovery ... in fact, they can't patent much of anything that they do. Nor can physicists.



Looking at the intricacy of the design of many machines sort of blows me away. Was it their genetics, environment, and/or diet?


None of the above,

The designs need to be intricate to address the problem they're solving. In other words, if I'm making a robot toy (which I have considered, BTW), I must use a lot of complex technology to ensure I have motors small enough to move the parts plus make sure it's not underpowered and a thousand other things. I can't simply stack two sticks together and say, "voila!"

Much of it is based on other designs, and it's all based on what they taught in college and learned in real-world application and design.



posted on May, 9 2006 @ 09:35 PM
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Currently I am an undergrad of engineering. I dont think there is anything special needed to be an engineer, but a technical and opened mind. Although my carear as an engineer is just starting out I have already come up with many new and interesting ideas.. Ok they wouldnt be possible without some background knowledge but most are born from simple problems and ideals.



posted on May, 9 2006 @ 09:52 PM
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I believe some people would wish that all engineers are clairvoyant.
A problem occurs and often an engineer is assigned to fix the problem or come up with a solution. Sometimes with enough time, the engineer knows a problem will occur and can come up with a solution to the problem before many other people even know of the problem. In that situation, the engineer may appear to be clairvoyant but he is actually just armed with more knowledge and the design skills or ability to create a solution to a problem that doesn't even seem to exist yet. I believe the engineering profession is taken for granted especially with some calling themselves engineers of some sort when they have no engineering degree.



posted on May, 9 2006 @ 10:12 PM
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Originally posted by Yarcofin
Many people believe that the longer you breastfeed a child, the smarter they'll be. Maybe engineers just got breastfed for a very long time. After that I'd say it's a mix of all three things you mention. They were predispositioned to be smarter in general and with analytical thinking. Add on top of that proper diet and being brought up in an environment that encouraged education, and I'd say that would essentially be the reason.


*pulls tit out of mouth to answer*

I think it's the "environment that encouraged education". I don't believe I was breastfed at all...mom was too old and too tired and been through the routine too many times. BUT, she encouraged my love for reading and learning. When I took the GRE to go on to graduate school I remember when my results came in my advisor called me into his office and said "There was some one in your life that instilled a love for learning in you. You need to go call them right now and thank them." I did...I called my mother. A 10th grade drop-out who was about to watch the first person in her family to ever graduate college.


That...and an inherent love for math and science.



[edit on 5-9-2006 by Valhall]



posted on May, 11 2006 @ 02:48 PM
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Byrd, I define a clairvoyant as a person who can create a new, useful, and nonobvious design within his or her brain with or without the aid of language. A higher degree of clairvoyance would be accorded that individual who can create that design without the aid of language.

I believe that high language ability is not clairvoyance, although it may be a sign, as language has been reduced to mathematics in my mind.



posted on May, 11 2006 @ 03:02 PM
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I'm a Telecoms Engineer and I am pretty sure I'm not clairvoyant.

I do have some rather interesting expieriences with my best mate though, where we will know what the other is thinking etc etc...

But I never get that at work.. I wish I did though! It would be so much easier to maintain 30 odd DMS switches if I was a psychic!



posted on May, 11 2006 @ 03:46 PM
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I'm a mechanical engineer, and I am constantly amazed at what we accomplish with engineering. I have worked on so many incredible projects with so many very intelligent people. I'm humbled.

I will admit that the best designs are just a little bit 'zen'. There's a place where just enough thinking goes into, and somewhere along the way you just have to trust your instincts. Sometimes math is art.

Oh and I had to laugh a little, thinking to myself that a lot of the engineers I know only WISH that they were breastfed.



posted on Jun, 7 2006 @ 08:04 PM
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To me, mathematicians are the master of numbers and physicists of language, but where do these engineers come up with these diagrams that we were never taught in elementary school?


XL5

posted on Jun, 8 2006 @ 02:43 AM
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You don't need advanced math to be an engineer. At least I don't, but the college I went to did. I was never good at math that didn't seem to have a use. I'm into electronics eng. and the hard part is finding something to make that I can't buy or find for cheap.

Engineering is easy if you have the right set of questions and know how things work, fail, break and how they can be put to use in a new way.

First you would have to ask what you want to do or what problem you want to solve. Then you ask your self if the parts needed are made already or if they can be made cheaply. Then think about how it may fail and what parts will not fail. Build it in your head and then build it in real life.

Every part in a system (like a car) is a subsystem and each has a function. knowing the limitations of each subsystem and how they can be fit together is the key to making something work well and last. A good mental exercise of how to do what an engineer does is to study the "art" of Rube Goldberg and pulling some things apart and looking at what the subsystems do and how they are linked together.

If only girls were that easy and maybe if, female engineers had big neon signs above thier heads stating such.



posted on Jun, 11 2006 @ 04:35 AM
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Being an undergraduate engineer who turned musician, i can say that eningeers probably have a better functioning inspiration and inner eye (inner visualisation). what that is, is personal, but I believe it to be a link with God. for where else does inspiration come from? like.. God sees we need some kind of invention, and then inspires a couple of engineers all over the world with some ideas, wich lead to the development of a new improvement on our lives.



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