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Your own internet, what would you need?

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CX

posted on May, 8 2006 @ 03:42 AM
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What does it take to make/build an internet network? I mean totaly from scratch. Hardware, sofware, financial cost, venue for the main system, everything.

When the internet was first invented, i think i'm right in saying it was initially intended for the military, and since then it's become the huge network that is the world wide web. If someone had the money and access to the technology, what would you need to do to have your very own secure internet.

I'm not sure if this question is very clear, i don't mean a secure part of the current internet network, i mean a totaly fresh, seperate internet that was only accessable to those who were allowed by you, the owner.

I'm only asking this out of curiosity. I figured that the internet that we all know and use, well it's such a mess and so insecure at times, there must be organisations out there that either already, or will some day want thier very own network that others can't access. Maybe this has already happened, if so, could anyone provide me with any info?

I'm suprised Bill Gates has'nt done anything like this yet, i'd imagine he'd be one of the few with the means to do so.

CX.




posted on May, 8 2006 @ 04:11 AM
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It's called an intranet and already exists.



posted on May, 8 2006 @ 04:16 AM
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Originally posted by Mbuhir
It's called an intranet and already exists.


yup, and most are used for companies, universities, etc....

all it really is its a private network....



posted on May, 8 2006 @ 04:39 AM
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You'd need two computers and a cable.

The bigger you wanted it to be, the more computers and cables you'd buy.



posted on May, 8 2006 @ 04:43 AM
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the internet was originaly created in the late 60's and was used in the research community govt and private.



posted on May, 8 2006 @ 04:58 AM
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I think your talking like a private network?

set up a lan at your house...then your king of the castle lol



posted on May, 8 2006 @ 05:09 AM
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In addition to what the others said... The Internet cannot be defined in terms of a single piece of hardware or software. It's a collection of Computers and or Networks connected to each other. That's the physical part... Now add "all" (or at least a great deal) the information in the world and add a great deal of opinion...



posted on May, 8 2006 @ 09:35 AM
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It largely depends on what you mean?

If you just want to duplicate the existing Internet, you basically need two computers, two routers, and 3 pieces of ethernet cable. (Each computer-to-router connection comprises its own separate network, while the connection between the two routers is an inter-network connection.)

All told, you could do that at this level for about $1000 to $1500, assuming you know how to configure the routers yourself. If not, tack on another $300 for the hourly rate for a network tech to do it for you.


Now if, on the other hand, you're talking about reinventing the Internet from whole cloth. Recreating the protocols, standards, hardware, etc, it will get a lot more expensive both in time and in cash.



posted on May, 8 2006 @ 09:47 AM
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Why would you need 2 routers for 2 computers?

Why would you need to configure the routers at all? Most are already set up to work correctly in a LAN

All you need is 2 computers and a cat 5 cable (can also be done without a cable or even a usb cable). Once you got that you need to configre the computer to talk to each other and that is it. The router should be used to make wireless easy and/or internet access between the computers.



posted on May, 8 2006 @ 09:47 AM
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Originally posted by CX
What does it take to make/build an internet network? I mean totaly from scratch. Hardware, sofware, financial cost, venue for the main system, everything.


Bill Gates' fortune, and then some. Seriously.

You'd need thousands of mainframes and server farms, you'd need to buy time on satellites, fiberoptic cables, you'd need redundant hardware, servers, routers, modems, (etc, etc,etc) plus techs to back it up 24-7 in every country of the world. You'd need to develop addressing schemes (so two computers can find each other) and either license or rewrite to avoid suits specialized technology and software (search engines, for instance.)



posted on May, 8 2006 @ 03:12 PM
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Originally posted by Whiskey Jack
It largely depends on what you mean?

If you just want to duplicate the existing Internet, you basically need two computers, two routers, and 3 pieces of ethernet cable. (Each computer-to-router connection comprises its own separate network, while the connection between the two routers is an inter-network connection.)

All told, you could do that at this level for about $1000 to $1500, assuming you know how to configure the routers yourself. If not, tack on another $300 for the hourly rate for a network tech to do it for you.


Now if, on the other hand, you're talking about reinventing the Internet from whole cloth. Recreating the protocols, standards, hardware, etc, it will get a lot more expensive both in time and in cash.


no, only one router and one (maybe two) peices of ethernet cable.
If you go for total cheap you can get a computer ( a decent one) for about $100 each, a GOOD router is only about $80, and you can get a 100ft ethernet cable at Fry's for about $20.
that's only about $300



posted on May, 8 2006 @ 06:15 PM
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Exactly, its very simple to create a branch of, or your own version of, the internet.

The only thing you need in hardware is a router... and of course computers and cable.

Depending on how large it is, you may need to learn about organising DNS tables.

I beat the internet once, the last guy was hard.



posted on May, 8 2006 @ 06:20 PM
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Originally posted by Mbuhir
no, only one router and one (maybe two) peices of ethernet cable.
If you go for total cheap you can get a computer ( a decent one) for about $100 each, a GOOD router is only about $80, and you can get a 100ft ethernet cable at Fry's for about $20.
that's only about $300


If this is indeed just about creating a simple home LAN, and not the design of some kind of new network, this can be done a lot cheaper.

Here's what I have:

Netgear wireless router (4 wired ports as well) - $25 off eBay
Two wireless cards for my and my wife's laptops, no brand, $8 each
Just add two computers
which can be had for about a hundred.

So the "internet" component is under $50, and no cables involved. Oh, I forgot another computer upstairs, PCI wireless card for $5 -- works like a charm.



posted on May, 9 2006 @ 10:59 AM
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Originally posted by scoobdude
Why would you need 2 routers for 2 computers?

Why would you need to configure the routers at all? Most are already set up to work correctly in a LAN

All you need is 2 computers and a cat 5 cable (can also be done without a cable or even a usb cable). Once you got that you need to configre the computer to talk to each other and that is it. The router should be used to make wireless easy and/or internet access between the computers.


Right, but a computer-to-computer connection, or even a computerroutercomputer connection, would just be one network. The original question was about duplicating the Internet, which is a set of protocols for networks to communicate with other networks, hence the "inter" part of the name.

Routers are a fairly quick-and-dirty way to define a network (though, as I'm sure someone is bound to point out, it's fairly common for a single network to contain multiple routers) as you need to use some tricks to get subnetting to extend beyond a router. So, ComputerA to RouterA comprises NetworkA, and ComputerB to RouterB comprises NetworkB. The cable between the two routers allows the two networks to talk to each other, and you've acheived internetworking.

Now that I think about it, though, you could make this simpler by just using two computers, two lengths of cat5, and a switch that's vlan capable.



posted on May, 9 2006 @ 09:51 PM
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Right, just to clarify:

ethernet network = 1 or more computers connected by a switch or hub
internet = 2 or more networks connected by routers

please note: the "router" u use to connect up ur home LAN is not a router in the typical sense.. without going into too much detail, a router just routes data between networks... no more. The "router" u use at home is actually a combination of a few techs , and isn't essential for a home network. It is, however, essential if u want to connect to the internet (they're basically a switch and router and a few other bits n bobs in 1 box) assuming u have a broadband connection.

"though, as I'm sure someone is bound to point out, it's fairly common for a single network to contain multiple routers"

I wouldn't say common by any stretch... a router is simply a means of connecting 1 or more networks together. its uncommon (esp. in home use) for simple networks to contain multiple routers.

"as you need to use some tricks to get subnetting to extend beyond a router"

subnetting is simply a means of getting more or less hosts on a network using the hostid bits of the IP address to further seperate into "sub networks"... EDIT: I've quoted u out of context on this one, and ur right, just worded a tad ambiguously (I swear I edited this bit already... or am I going insane?)

"The cable between the two routers allows the two networks to talk to each other, and you've acheived internetworking.

Now that I think about it, though, you could make this simpler by just using two computers, two lengths of cat5, and a switch that's vlan capable."

correct!

"Here's what I have:

Netgear wireless router (4 wired ports as well) - $25 off eBay
Two wireless cards for my and my wife's laptops, no brand, $8 each
Just add two computers
which can be had for about a hundred.

So the "internet" component is under $50, and no cables involved. Oh, I forgot another computer upstairs, PCI wireless card for $5 -- works like a charm."

thats not an internet... its a LAN... but it will suite ur needs perfectly, although strictly speaking, once u plug in ur broadband connection u are part of the internet.

EDIT: sorry to be anal, but I happen to be revising for my uni exams at the mo, hence the picking up on the details


[edit on 9-5-2006 by john_bmth]

[edit on 9-5-2006 by john_bmth]


[edit on 9-5-2006 by john_bmth]



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