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Infra Red Light Spectrum Visibility

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posted on May, 6 2006 @ 09:51 AM
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Ok, I'm sure most of us on this sight have watched the 2005 Jamie Maussan UFO Conference video. My interest was peeked when he showed the video footage of two cameras mounted on a tripod, one on top of the other, so they filmed the exact same thing at the exact same time. One camera was regular, which filmed the light spectrum visible to the human eye.....and the other camera filmed the infra red light spectrum. He showed both films side by side and nothing out of the ordinary was filmed by the regular camera, however there was a floating sphere in the sky captured by the infra red camera.

Does anyone out there have an infra red camera? Is there anyway a pair of glasses or goggles could let us view the infra red spectrum? Or ANY other spectrum for that matter.

I've read that UFO's can become invisible by changing their vibrational frequency, which I would imagine would make them impossible to see. But, if they're just hiding in a different light spectrum which the human eye can't see.....it is possible to see them with the right equipment.

I can't help but think of the old movie with "Rowdy Roddy Piper" entitled "They Live". It's about aliens living among us and they are only visible by wearing these special sun glasses.

I'd like to hear some thoughts on this.




posted on May, 6 2006 @ 10:47 AM
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that is exactly what i said for the most part on the 2005 Jamie Maussan UFO Conference video thread, i think we should deff start carriying around cameras with infra red just so we can see whats out there more.



posted on May, 6 2006 @ 10:51 AM
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Many cameraes are actually able to take pictures out of the visible spectrum, maybe thats the reason lots of people say they didnt see anything when the picture got taken...



posted on May, 6 2006 @ 11:16 AM
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Raytheon sells their FLIR ThermoVison A series camera... small, very powerful research camera... USB to Laptop. Other companies sell a variety of hardware too. Non of it is inexpensive - yet.

Sooner or later low-end consumer versions of this tech'll trickle down to us mortals... just like the tang/net/cell/GPS/DV technologies. I would love a camera that was some sort of full-spectrum array with output tuned to that which humans can see... sort of a dial-a-spectrum device. Someone's (human/non-human) got to have invented such a beastie by now.

I'd like to see if "Rods" show up on IFR. Aren't there animals that experience "vision" in the infrared spectrum? Might be handy to have such an animal in lieu of a thermo-cam when huntin' on a budget? I wonder if one could "see" changes in local gravitational "fields" and program an "alert" gate-set to trigger recording?



posted on May, 6 2006 @ 11:26 AM
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Well ordinary objects can't really "hide" in a different light spectrum, if an object is physically tangible then it'll reflect back visible light which will hit the retina. The best way to stop this from happening (and thus rendering an object invisible) is to use optical camouflage. Currently the only way we can do this is to project an image of the area behind the object onto the object itself, but in the future we might come up with portable technology that actually bends light around an object giving us a seamless effect.

Now infrared light is different, the emission of infrared radiation is usually a direct byproduct of heat. This is why it's used in certain types of night vision goggles, to pick up interesting things such as people and cars. With the UFO you refer to, it sounds like it utilises optical camouflage but the outer surface gives off heat which I find interesting. If an alien civilisation discovered and implemented optical camouflage, you would think that they'd give a thought to thermal camouflage as well (since infrared and visible light are right next to each other on the electromagnetic spectrum).

Infrared cameras are not uncommon nowadays, many DV cameras have an infrared mode built in. The CCDs in still digital cameras are also sensitive to infrared light (though not as much), try pointing a remote at your digital camera lens and pressing a button on the remote.



posted on May, 6 2006 @ 11:51 AM
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I understand what you're saying....But I really don't think that applies here. Sure you could PAINT an abject to blend in with its surroundings, but as soon as it moved from its exact spot from which the painting was matched, it would become visible again.

Suppose a UFO paints itself white to blend in with the clouds, it would stick out like a turd in a punchbowl as soon as the clouds are gone.

I think it has something to do with the bending of light around the UFO. This is caused by the craft creating it's own gravitational field. Now I believe that maybe the 2nd part of your explaination could stand up. We couldn't see the craft because light was bent around it, however the infra red spectrum camera COULD register the HEAT of the craft making it visible.

Instead of Night Vision goggles....I want a pair of Infra Red goggles!!!



posted on May, 6 2006 @ 12:33 PM
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Originally posted by NightBlade40
Well ordinary objects can't really "hide" in a different light spectrum...

They can!



posted on May, 6 2006 @ 01:31 PM
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I totally agree with you Trappedsoul.



posted on May, 6 2006 @ 08:23 PM
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Originally posted by MrChipps
I understand what you're saying....But I really don't think that applies here. Sure you could PAINT an abject to blend in with its surroundings, but as soon as it moved from its exact spot from which the painting was matched, it would become visible again.

Suppose a UFO paints itself white to blend in with the clouds, it would stick out like a turd in a punchbowl as soon as the clouds are gone.


I said projecting an image is how we are currently doing it, just as a FYI tidbit. Also I never said anything about painting anything to try and camouflage it, that would be silly
When I talk about the first kind of optical camouflage (projection), I mean this sort of thing.


I think it has something to do with the bending of light around the UFO. This is caused by the craft creating it's own gravitational field. Now I believe that maybe the 2nd part of your explaination could stand up. We couldn't see the craft because light was bent around it, however the infra red spectrum camera COULD register the HEAT of the craft making it visible.


Pretty much what I said, except without the gravitational field bit. If a craft were to be spherical like the one you mentioned in the first post, a gravitation field would probably be the best way to render it invisible. You wouldn't have to make the field a different strength in different places to compensate for the shape of the craft, like you might for a saucer shaped craft or a traditional airplane.


Originally posted by TrappedSoul
They can!


Could you please go into more detail about this?



posted on May, 6 2006 @ 09:56 PM
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Sorry nightblade, I missunderstood you. When you said Project an image on it, I took that wrong. Although bending light around an object to hide it is not at all projecting an image onto it. They are 2 completly different camos.

Suppose I stood in front of a large movie screen while a movie was being played. The image is being projected on me and it might hide me frome site if you were at a far enough distance. But bend the light around me so that no light is bouncing off of me back to your eyes, and I become invisible.

2 completly different things.



posted on May, 6 2006 @ 10:08 PM
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Also, I think I may have just touched on what Trappedsoul meant. If I bend the light around an object so that no light is bounced back to your eyes, enableing you to see it, then It becomes invisible. But the object is still there. If I bounce another spectrum of light off that object, such as infrared light.....I can use an infra red camera to SEE it.

Of course that would only hold true if you can bend only one spectrum of light at a time. If ALL spectrums are bent simotaniously, then I guess the object would remain invisible no matter what.

I'm just a country boy who's trying to make sence out of something I know nothing about.


But it keeps me busy....



posted on May, 6 2006 @ 11:16 PM
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Infra Red is not a frequency, but a band of frequencies. Thermal is only a narrow portion of the infra red band. Cameras and sensors are usually made to record in specific IR frequencies. Very few are designed to record the entire IR band.

Healthy actively growing plants reflect near- and mid- IR frequencies very well (these are not the thermal frequencies). Deer, elk, and a few other ungulates can see into the near IR just beyond the sensitivity of human vision. The hypothesis is they developed this ability to tell which plants are better for browsing. There are a few documented reports of individual humans that could also see near IR.



posted on May, 6 2006 @ 11:25 PM
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daves right. Thermal only takes up a small part of the whole IR spectrum.

But if you want to see in that small part, night-vision goggles and even some of the newer handheld cameras can do it. Flick the camera over to 'night,' and it emits a beam that the camera picks up, rather like Gen-0/1 night vision technology.

Although both these see in very limited bands, farther down the frequency range towards visible light. NVG's would be better for thermal IR, for sure. There are cameras out there that are designed for just IR operation, usually for nature shows and all that. Cost a wallet or two.



posted on May, 7 2006 @ 01:41 AM
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I have a pair of the type of infra red glasses you are talking about. i bought them here.
cgi.ebay.com...



posted on May, 7 2006 @ 05:57 AM
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Do those glasses actually allow you to see into the IR spectrum of light? Can you see things when you are wearing them which you can't when you aren't?



posted on May, 7 2006 @ 11:47 AM
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yes. they work by additively mixing blue light with infrared light to produce a magenta. just the same way mixing red light with blue on the color wheel. I really do feel that these things will allow you to possibly see UFO's if the UFO's are cloaked to visible light.
You could possibly use a camera pointed at the sky to detect ufo's



posted on May, 7 2006 @ 12:30 PM
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All the digital cameras I have seen can "see" infrared light.

You can make a test using a infrared remote control, if in the camera's image you see a light when you activate the remote control then that camera can "see" infrared light.

I think the range is something like 850-980nm for the led's wavelength.



posted on May, 7 2006 @ 06:07 PM
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the cheap ones do but the more expensive cameras have a dichroic filter(heat mirror) which cuts off all IR light. These glasses make excellent camera filters. pop a lens out and tape it over your lens. i was sent a graph with these glasses and showed a cutoff of 700nm going all the way up to 2000nm



posted on May, 7 2006 @ 06:16 PM
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Originally posted by TrappedSoul

They can!


agreed



posted on Jul, 27 2008 @ 03:17 PM
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I have rare infrared glasses that help me see only infrared light. The world looks completely different with these glasses. All the plants and trees are red and light sources have a 3D type of glow to them. I use them here and there, but no sign of UFOs so far. If I do see them, I'll use my 9 megapixel camera and binoculars.



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