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real reason for ozone hole!!!

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posted on Apr, 26 2006 @ 02:37 AM
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Has anyone ever thought that maybe the whole reason there is a hole in the ozone layer is because of the ships that we has a human race keep shooting out of the atmosphere? Think about it, the only half logical arguements say that the hole is too far from where we launch any rockets. However due to physics the easiest way to penetrate the atmosphere is at an angle. I have not done enough research to prove this theory, but I do not think I could even do enough research due to the amount of secrecy in our governments. The basic theory is that if a ship was launched at a low enough angle it could pop out of the ozone layer almost anywhere around the earth. Compelling huh?




posted on Apr, 26 2006 @ 02:45 AM
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That it is, maybe something can be found that supports this theory. Perhaps rocket launch paths and such, given the members of ATS this is possable. I'll not under estimate th power of the membership working together. Some of the best material resulted from such, a scary beast at times when unleashed.

Let's see what can be found, often things are over looked. The best place to hide some thing, is in plain sight, right?

edit-spelling

[edit on 26-4-2006 by ADVISOR]



posted on Apr, 26 2006 @ 04:03 AM
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But the ozone layer isnt so much a bubble...but a level of gas....so its not as if you could puncture it with a space ship....



posted on Apr, 26 2006 @ 04:08 AM
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Im not saying that the ships "popped it" necessarily, but that they dissrupted it. Maybe by pushing the gasses to the side by putting a ship through it and being that high in the atmosphere there may not be enough external energy to push the gasses back.



posted on Apr, 26 2006 @ 04:12 AM
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Hey RANGE_MASTER, you have a new u2u.
If this idea can built a stable enough theory, this could lead to a project. Just to leave the option out there.



posted on Apr, 26 2006 @ 04:36 AM
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I guess I will have to step up and do some research then. I wasnt sure if there would be enough support of my theory to encourage my research.



posted on Apr, 26 2006 @ 04:41 AM
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No, it's not possible. The ozone layer is a thick layer of gas located between 32, 000 and 164, 000 feet (10 [usually 15] to 50 km). That means 747's sometimes fly into the ozone layer. And, as given by the figures here, the layer is approximately 35-40 kilometres (132, 000 feet, 25 miles) thick. It is not some 2 metre thick layer of gas, as a fair amount of people believe it to be. Infact, the layer contains only a few parts-per-million of ozone gas. It is by no means pure 03.

Also, when you hear the term 'ozone depletion,' the speaker is usually referencing the total amount of ozone, and its depletion of 3 per cent every 10 years. The seasonal - repeat seasonal - ozone holes occur over the polar regions of our planet, and are also growing larger, because of the 3 per cent loss of ozone gas every decade because of the release of free radical catalysts, such as hydroxyl, and chlorofluorocarbons and hydrocarbons (the latter of which propels your flyspray out of the can. Go on, have a look at the label).

The reason the holes are over the arctic regions is because those areas get a huge variation in sunlight compared to the rest of the planet, and during the 3 or so months of winter, they get absolutely no sunlight at all. If you know about ozone, you'll know that ultraviolet light (a component of sunlight) is needed to produce ozone. Thus, no light = less ozone. So when you couple the annual decrease in light, seasonal changes, and the polar stratospheric clouds, which are made of nitric acid and water ice (which both hasten the degradation of ozone molecules), you get the ozone hole.

And these are no small holes. Take a look at this pic of the largest hole so far in Sept. 2000:



As you can see, the hole is only over the antarctic (where no rockets go because they get the most speed when launched at the equator), and is quite isolated compared to the rest of the layer except for that tiny bit over Aus over where I live dammit. NOT lol.

A rocket is a few metres in diameter. Even taking into account the massive rocket exhaust, it would have no more effect than throwing a skewer through a cloud of steam. Yeah, none. Sorry to burst the 'bubble'.

edit: spellign



[edit on 26/4/2006 by watch_the_rocks]



posted on Apr, 26 2006 @ 05:05 AM
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Advisor can you clean up the mess i made sorry


[edit on 26-4-2006 by gps777]



posted on Apr, 26 2006 @ 05:05 AM
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Tripple post sorry,watch_the_rocks beat me to it


[edit on 26-4-2006 by gps777]



posted on Apr, 26 2006 @ 05:06 AM
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Don't mean to disrespect your theory but this quote describes the ozone layer problems.

The ozone layer is about 35 kilometers thick around the world and there are about three molecules of ozone for every 10 million air molecules,which sounds quite sparse to me,i cannot imagine space craft doing the amount of damage there is to the ozone layer no matter what direction they take going out or returning.


Where is ozone found in the atmosphere?
Ozone is mainly found in two regions of the Earth's atmosphere. Most ozone (about 90%) resides in a layer that begins between 6 and 10 miles (10 and 17 kilometers) above the Earth's surface and extends up to about 30 miles (50 kilometers). This region of the atmosphere is called the stratosphere. The ozone in this region is commonly known as the ozone layer. The remaining ozone is in the lower region of the atmosphere, which is commonly called the troposphere. The figure (above) shows an example of how ozone is distributed in the atmosphere.

The hole decreases and increases due to weather conditions.


There is also widespread scientific and public interest and concern about losses of ozone in the stratosphere. Ground-based and satellite instruments have measured decreases in the amount of stratospheric ozone in our atmosphere. Over some parts of Antarctica, up to 60% of the total overhead amount of ozone (known as the column ozone) is depleted during Antarctic spring (September-November). This phenomenon is known as the Antarctic ozone hole. In the Arctic polar regions, similar processes occur that have also led to significant chemical depletion of the column ozone during late winter and spring in 7 out of the last 11 years. The ozone loss from January through late March has been typically 20-25%, and shorter-period losses have been higher, depending on the meteorological conditions encountered in the Arctic stratosphere.

www.ozonelayer.noaa.gov...


Whether air or spacecraft damages ozone i have no idea but think that is something else all together,but not because a craft is flying through it and dispersing it.





[edit on 26-4-2006 by gps777]



posted on Apr, 26 2006 @ 05:09 AM
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oops ats was lagging and i kept hitting send

[edit on 26-4-2006 by gps777]



posted on Apr, 26 2006 @ 05:33 AM
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srz gps777. Didn't mean to mess things up here. Lagging? No, it's jsut the site slowing down as people work out the new character limits and image rules. hehe.

edit: By the way, what on earth is a 'project'? I've heard of them around the place, but never really bothered to look into them. If it involves a lot of research and all that, I'm in. If you'll note my above post, I say "It is not some 2 metre thick layer of gas, as a fair amount of people believe it to be." The reason I said that was because I thought it really was a 2 metre thick layer of gas when I first looked at this thread. And then read the post. It almost convinves you I've spent my whole life as 'ozoneoligist' (im a big wishful thinker).

[edit on 26/4/2006 by watch_the_rocks]



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