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Americans to be given tips on how to behave properly when traveling outside of country

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posted on Apr, 17 2006 @ 05:33 AM
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Originally posted by DrBones666
Arrrrggggghhh!!!!

I just wrote the longest reply to this and lost it....

So I'll write a simplified version, again....

I agree with the idea that it is your government that is to blame for most of your international image, and not the actual American people. However, you guys could easily be seen as supporting it, because you voted them in, and from an international standpoint, we don't see many of you condemning their actions on any wide scale.







You need to be updated on the rigged voting. Havent you heard? Bush and his administration stole the elections TWICE. Yes, shame on us for sitting back and taking it.




posted on Apr, 17 2006 @ 06:55 AM
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Ah dgtempe I pray for you if you honestly think that, and I’m not even religious!
Anyway I for one would never go oversees and denounce my government to make my “hosts” feel better. As far as I'm concerned they have their government and we have ours.



posted on Apr, 17 2006 @ 07:14 AM
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And the ignorant arrogant American traveller shows his face.

Do us a favour and don't travel.....

DGTempe, yeah I know, the elections were rigged, but you guys could have revolted or something...



posted on Apr, 17 2006 @ 07:24 AM
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Originally posted by DrBones666
And the ignorant arrogant American traveller shows his face.

Do us a favour and don't travel.....

DGTempe, yeah I know, the elections were rigged, but you guys could have revolted or something...
Human beings are strange. This is the second country i live in where the population is mesmerized by its leader, and instead of acting and reacting, they just take it.

But the topic here was.......* Will try again*

The irony that this government , crooked as it is, want to give citizens and business people "tutorials" on how to act abroad.



posted on Apr, 17 2006 @ 07:27 AM
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Originally posted by WestPoint23
Ah dgtempe I pray for you if you honestly think that, and I’m not even religious!
No offense, but you are not even on the right track. Thanks for praying for me, that i might see the light....


Back at ya. I pray for you 2.

Friends?



posted on Apr, 17 2006 @ 08:29 AM
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French are the worse.

For those who have visited Canterbury Catherdral, during pray time over the speaker, you have to be silent (respect reasons), sadly, French tourist go running around the Catherdral shouting and screaming...

Even in the crypt, you have to be silent all the time because its a private area for pray. Sadly, the French don't. I can feel the anger boiling now
AHHHHHH!!!!

But Americans are very polite around the Catherdral, i have to say...which is suprising.



posted on Apr, 17 2006 @ 08:36 AM
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As long as we are finding faults...

Nothing worse than a group of chinese people at the end of work on the subway in Boston.

My Spanish family!
Really, we're not fighting...just talking!



posted on Apr, 17 2006 @ 08:41 AM
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Every Englishmen will agree with me when i say

German's do not have a sense of humour. At my old work, i use to crack jokes to tourists, the German's use to have a look of horror....



posted on Apr, 17 2006 @ 09:27 AM
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Originally posted by WestPoint23

I’d be willing to take you up on that! I don't know what kind of light stuff you drink down there but you still wont last against some people I know.


Americans can keep up with anyone on the planet. We just can't be drinking American pee-water. American microbrews are fantastic. American macrobrews suck the big booby. I wouldn't drink a US macrobrew if it was the last beer on earth.



I must say though, never challenge a Russian to a drinking contest, never, I swear those people run on alcohol.


It's how Russians drink that's the key. It involves what food they eat while they're drinking. I have provided a handy dandy link for those who wish to imbibe
: How to Drink Vodka and Stay Sober .

I'm happy to say that I've tested this method, to the letter, and it does work!



posted on Apr, 17 2006 @ 10:32 AM
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Originally posted by dgtempe
The irony that this government , crooked as it is, want to give citizens and business people "tutorials" on how to act abroad.


I believe the US State Department is merely joining with the BDA in a joint effort toward cultural awareness education when traveling in general.

Most major companies and various governmental organizations already provide these types of etiquette/public imaging courses, pamphlets, tutorials and brochures ‘in house’ for those traveling/working abroad.

There is no insult and I agree with the idea completely, in business or any official role especially. On ‘tourism’ some minor points, shallow points or general guidelines would be better than what exists today.

In fairness to the article, I personally have seen some (not many) very embarrassing Americans while overseas so much so I am not sure how some even functioned socially in the States...and I am American…(there are some darn funny comments/observations about us by 'others' as well)…but I can easily say the same of some foreign tourists visiting the States.



mg



posted on Apr, 17 2006 @ 12:38 PM
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Yeah gotta say ill second that. I was in Paris in 2003, at the the top of the Eifel tower,in the que behind four american tourists who fitted the stereotype so well i thought they must not be americans at all but some form of french satirical entertainiers taking the mick, But no.
Three of them sported impressive beer guts, wore sandals (with socks of course
) and the archetyple "fanny pack". They were selling bottles of frozen mineral water at the top, which one of them found hilarious. I rememebr how he laid a hand on one of the tower staff and yelled "He buddy, u got a flamethrower?" brandishing the bottle of frozen water an grinning, the poor french staff member able only to smile awkwardly , Which pt the american and his compatriots in fits of guttural laughter. I had to admit i was peeing myself as well.

Having said that though, i met a guy in the pub last week from pennsylvania, and i can say ive never met a more level hedded and cool guy.

As for us brits, i think were foul abroad. Weve turned ibiza and the costa del sol into any other british town on a friday and saturday night. Punters are looking to tank up on stella, have a fight, have a kebab, and get their leg over, not neccesarily in that order.

ah the glorious legacy of the British empire
......


[edit on 17-4-2006 by TheSilentProtagonist]



posted on Apr, 17 2006 @ 03:09 PM
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Brings a tear to my eye
We know how to have a good time!

From a British viewpoint though i'd have to say the French are the worst. I've been to America three times and have never ever had a problem


As for France.. well.. one word.. Agincourt



posted on Apr, 17 2006 @ 03:21 PM
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LoL. Maybe americans should just stay at home.


quote from link

As a US citizen living in London, Christian Cox says she is shocked at the amount of abuse she receives because of her nationality.

She says the level of anti-Americanism she has experienced "feels like a kind of racism".

"I don't want anyone to feel sorry for Americans, or me, I just want people to realise that we are dealing with hatred too," she says.


Some of her friends told her to say she was from canada. lol


comment from canadian
If you suspect your 'Canadian' is actually American, ask them to name three provinces (excluding Ontario). Or ask them what the capital of Saskatchewan is. You'll soon know. (We don't like them either, by the way.)


Just make sure you know the canadian provinces.


[edit on 17-4-2006 by kode]



posted on Apr, 17 2006 @ 03:29 PM
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As a US citizen living in London, Christian Cox says she is shocked at the amount of abuse she receives because of her nationality.

She says the level of anti-Americanism she has experienced "feels like a kind of racism".


That is only the one view. I have family in the hotel industry and many American's stay.. most may be a little fussy e.g. Asking for ice (America is a hot country.. asking for ice fair enough.. Britain is freezing.. how the hell do you need ice?!
).

On the whole there hasn't been a single complaint regarding any anti-Americanism.



posted on Apr, 17 2006 @ 03:43 PM
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And the ignorant arrogant American traveller shows his face.

Do us a favour and don't travel.....


Are you referring to me, sir?
“Ignorant arrogant American traveler?” That sure is a bold statement considering you’re the one who views people differently unless they come weeping and apologizing for their government. If you don’t like our government, fine, I personally don’t care but don't think you have a right to force your views on others because you believe you are right and they surly are wrong. Do you know what that's called?

____________________________________________________________________________


Back at ya. I pray for you 2.

Friends?


Of course.



posted on Apr, 17 2006 @ 03:47 PM
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Now im not one for indulging in militarstic nationalist bragging, but might i also add.

Crecy, Poitiers, Trafalgar, Waterloo


Even so id choose Paris over London any day



posted on Apr, 17 2006 @ 04:25 PM
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We all have stereotypes for people of other nations. When you have never met someone, it is easy to believe the stereotypes, but you when get to know someone in person, the stereotypes usually go away.

I have recently met an American in a business trip to Paris. I have only positive things to say: I have never met such an easy going, outspoken, open, honest person. We laughed and joked while at the airport, as if we were close friends. I was impressed.

Of course all Americans are not the same. I have noticed that some of the things the guide says in my trips abroad: Americans tend to speak out loud; but we Greeks are even louder. Americans tend to speak as if the whole world is America...but that is understandable: if I was brainwashed about "America this, America that" or "world series this, world champion that", I would speak as if America was the center of the world (which it almost is, but that is another story). For Americans, everything should be big: big cars, big roads, big steaks, big everything. I understand that, as we modern Greeks are more Americans than Europeans (you should see the size and content of our dinner tables! that's why we are the fattest people in Europe...).

Overall, I prefer honest loud persons that can tell a good joke (i.e. English and Americans) than quiet smugs (i.e. French and German). No matter how I respect all the countries, I believe it is quite hypocritical to have to eat cheese as a first dish and get weird faces when I don't. I just prefer a big nice Texas T-bone stake, thank you very much. And french fries.

But that is about common folks...the US foreign policy is something entirely different, and my country is a victim of US in more than one occasions...



posted on Apr, 17 2006 @ 04:40 PM
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I've pretty much been all over this old world several times and I have to say I've never been anywhere I did not like, including France. The locals all over tend to have stereotypes of Americans in their minds as loud, obnoxious and arrogant. It's pretty easy to see why too as you can generally pick an American out of the crowd most anywhere because of the traits that cause the stereotype to begin with. However, it is generally pretty easy to get past the initial unfriendliness and reluctance to associate--just a little effort to treat people as equals and not act in a way that essentially sneers or makes fun of some of the local customs.

I have found that if you treat people with dignity and respect they will pretty much do the same. I think it's kind of funny that the BO smell thing came up because as an American you really can't help but notice it no matter where you travel. (Try dancing all evening at a club in Scotland and then savor the smell around midnight.) Americans seem to have a thing about body smells more so than any other culture in the world. Americans spend gobs of money buying things to cover up or disguise body smells and almost unconsciously conclude foreigners are dirty if they can smell them. And that isn't generally the case at all, they just don't put on all the crap that we do to disguise them and cover them up.



posted on Apr, 17 2006 @ 07:00 PM
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Originally posted by Astronomer68
I've pretty much been all over this old world several times and I have to say I've never been anywhere I did not like, including France. The locals all over tend to have stereotypes of Americans in their minds as loud, obnoxious and arrogant. It's pretty easy to see why too as you can generally pick an American out of the crowd most anywhere because of the traits that cause the stereotype to begin with. However, it is generally pretty easy to get past the initial unfriendliness and reluctance to associate--just a little effort to treat people as equals and not act in a way that essentially sneers or makes fun of some of the local customs.

I have found that if you treat people with dignity and respect they will pretty much do the same. I think it's kind of funny that the BO smell thing came up because as an American you really can't help but notice it no matter where you travel. (Try dancing all evening at a club in Scotland and then savor the smell around midnight.) Americans seem to have a thing about body smells more so than any other culture in the world. Americans spend gobs of money buying things to cover up or disguise body smells and almost unconsciously conclude foreigners are dirty if they can smell them. And that isn't generally the case at all, they just don't put on all the crap that we do to disguise them and cover them up.


Thank the heavens.

I was getting to the end of this thread and thought I would never come across a poster talking sense on this subject,
Astronomer68.

There is a distinct lack of PC'ness on this thread, although no one has chosen to be offended.

I have been fortunate to have been friends with a very diverse group of friends over the years and have travelled to numerous countries and experienced many different cultures and as yet, have yet to experience a stereotype.

People have to categorise or pidgeon hole in order to feel secure, preconceptions are hard to shake as prejudices surround us as we grow.

It's up to us to break through those preconceptions.

Here is a generalisation:

I have found that most people who veermently deny that they have prejudices have not even begun to understand the concept of prejudice.



posted on Apr, 17 2006 @ 10:16 PM
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I brought up the BO thing and of course meant no offense to anyone, jsut as something I've noticed. Also Japan, my favorite country to visit, doesnt smell either, nor does Canada, but I dont consider it another country more like a brother of America, but great place too, and I'm sure that comment has offended many canadians, but it's how I and alot of americans feel.



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