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Why is race such a taboo subject?

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posted on Apr, 23 2006 @ 08:27 PM
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Consider my hometown. Louisville, Ky. Home of the World’s Greatest Boxer, Muhammad Ali. Born Cassius Marcellus Clay. He could have been designated “The Second” for there was a white abolitionist living near Lexington in the mid 19th century by that same name. He converted to Islam about the time the Vietnam War was ramping up.

Louisville wrestled with its collective conscience when Ali declined to be drafted and was penalized by the boxing authorities which took away his title and forbade him to fight for 4 years. Arguably his best 4 years. Gone and not to be recaptured. But Louisville lost its argument, too. Ali was shunned by the white community and for other reasons, by many in the black community, too.

But Ali persevered. He kept his cool. He lived the life he advocated. He lived an exemplary life. After 4 years, it was becoming obvious to everyone Ali had been right all along. The war was not legitimate and minorities were paying a disproportionate price in blood. Public pressure caused the fight moguls - say Mafia - another national disgrace in itself - to allow Ali back into the ring. (I will always believe Sonny Liston took a dive in the second fight, but that Ali did not collaborate.)

Even when prompted by good motives, white's screw up. A main east west street was renamed for Ali. But it carries heavy baggage. It was one of the several streets on which black women rode streetcars eastward, early in the mornings, to do day labor in up scale white neighborhoods at the other end of the line. Then, in the afternoon, they rode back west towards their own very modest homes. $2 in their pockets. Do you know what that work does to your social security check when you are too old to work? (History lesson: under the FDR New Deal there was a minimum Social Security payment. Not now. Thank you, Ronald Reagan.)

Central High School. Louisville’s segregated public school system had one black high school. It was located in a building built before the Civil War. This building was not replaced until the 1960s, when it became obvious the courts were going to require white children to attend school in that building. Despite the poor facilities, Central’s “Yellow Jackets” as the sports teams were known, were highly regarded in the Black Division of the KHSAA, Kentucky High School Athletic Associations, a quasi governmental regulatory body. When the Federal Court ordered the integration of the public schools, the proportion of white to black was 70 to 30. This requirement overlooked the sports aspect, and Central’s teams were split around the county’s high schools.

Now, over the years, Central High had become an institution in the black community. Blacks had one thing they could be proud of, a darn good football and an even better basketball team! Blacks got a new building and lost the focal point in their community. Whites did not understand the black’s affection for Central High, and besides, getting a couple good athletes into an otherwise weak all white program was too good to give up for black pride, which was not very High on the white's list of good things, anyway. Well, I’ve rambled too much. The point of my story is that Muhammad Ali now has a multi-million dollar Museum of Boxing, but it is not at Central High. It is in the downtown, revitalized tourist and up-scale business district. When the white people wanted it and where the white people put it. That was done in 2004.

Too many whites still have no respect for blacks. Acceptance, yes, respect, no.

www.usnews.com/usnews/doubleissue/heroes/ali.htm

www.maprc.com/home/info/parkinsons.aspx

[edit on 4/23/2006 by donwhite]




posted on Apr, 23 2006 @ 08:37 PM
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originally posted by police_officer339 Look at the recent epithet "DOG" where did that come from? Is it complimentary? I doubt it, at least not too me. I'll not list the many more that are used everyday, suffice it to say, they are rude. I guess I developed much of my attitude working in the projects for 15 years on a mostly white police department. I saw the very ugly side of what those innocent words can do when just thrown about. I've seen the hurt, the anger and sady, usually the retaliation.


Respectfully, though you disagree that perception is a good part of communication, your whole post describes your perception of two words. Nigga and DOG (or the slang which is spelled Dawg). Would I be wrong to assume that you have a lot of issues with slang in general?

I'm sorry that my use of the n-word would bother you to the point that you dismissed me, but I'm not taking any words out of my vocab because of how they make someone else feel especially when it is not my intent to degrade anyone. We are grown ups. We are able to discern whether a comment is hateful or not. I also reject your comparison to words like genocide and holocaust. Those words only have one meaning or one overall connotation.

Still, thanks for your service to our community.


[edit on 23-4-2006 by Saphronia]



posted on Apr, 23 2006 @ 09:02 PM
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Thank you...


Not dismissed..no certainly not. But the use of language is that one aspect that can truly define intellect. Proper use can raise one from poor beginnings, and inspire greatness. So not dismissed, simply not wish to associate with the abasement of the English Language and the people that speak it.
I value your opinion and thank you for your response, but I've seent he damage, no matter how subtle or well meaning, and refuse to be a party to it.



posted on Apr, 23 2006 @ 09:25 PM
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donwhite,

Your posts have not gone neglected in my mind. Nor your questions. I want to answer the inquiries that you bring up in your great texts, but I would like to take the time to think about them and answer thoughtfully. So, bear with me. I will provide an answer.

Saphronia and police_officer339,

Your exchange is also relevant because it reveals not only the use of the "n-word", but also its implications. Yes, sadly, it is part of the English language. And of course, it is in the eye of the beholder. But, maybe it should be seen in the same way one would take on the mantle of power: that it is a figure of speech that must be handled carefully and thoughtfully, lest uncontained it will unleash a lot of damage.

But with that being said, I think that there is much more to say about the "n-word" and its employment in our language as a figure of speech. And like I said before, we have to think about its value and worth as a part of conversation and as a "race-baiting" word. It does have to do with stereotypes; it also has to do with what its meaning is perceived to be.

desert:

I forgot to bring up the point in my last post about bell hooks. I like her work. And I have several of her books. She makes it a point to examine issues of African-Americans, especially Black women. My favorite is black looks. There are many more, and I will probably mention them in future posts.

And please, don't be shy. Make sure to ask some questions too! I would like to hear more on what you have to say about race-relations. This is a contributory thread. The different insights of other people is what makes it great.

denythestatusquo:

I am still waiting for your response. I would really like you to give your version of race-relations from your point of view. I'm sure it has to do with immigration and economics, or else you would not have mentioned it. I'm curious also to hear why you feel this conversation is hilarious.

To everyone else:

Please feel free to contribute your thoughts and if you have some solutions to end racism, please post them. Also, continue to ask questions and bring up issues! (I know that this is getting tired, but I am still going on with that mantra long and hard. I'll only stop if people will bring up some of their thoughts and questions to hash out in this thread. Until then, I'll keep nagging you all to death!
)

[edit on 23-4-2006 by ceci2006]



posted on Apr, 23 2006 @ 09:29 PM
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Keep nagging ceci
we love ya



posted on Apr, 23 2006 @ 11:24 PM
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donwhite, what's with all the negativity towards whites? Your posts are filled with those comments.



posted on Apr, 24 2006 @ 09:14 AM
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Originally posted by jsobecky
donwhite, what's with all the negativity towards whites? Your posts are filled with those comments.


js, Would you quote a couple of them here so I could see what you mean? Because I didn't see any negativity towards whites. Maybe I'm not looking at the right post? Thanks.



posted on Apr, 24 2006 @ 10:42 AM
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Originally posted by Benevolent Heretic
js, Would you quote a couple of them here so I could see what you mean? Because I didn't see any negativity towards whites. Maybe I'm not looking at the right post? Thanks.

Sure, BH. I don't want to start an argument with dw, I just don't understand some of these comments.

From his most recent post:

"Even when prompted by good motives, white's screw up."

"Whites did not understand the black’s affection for Central High, and besides, getting a couple good athletes into an otherwise weak all white program was too good to give up for black pride, which was not very High on the white's list of good things, anyway."

"The point of my story is that Muhammad Ali now has a multi-million dollar Museum of Boxing, but it is not at Central High. It is in the downtown, revitalized tourist and up-scale business district. When the white people wanted it and where the white people put it. That was done in 2004."

"Too many whites still have no respect for blacks."
********************

From earlier posts:

"Of course, all this hidden meaning passes over the head of the white persons who may be present but are unaware of the subtle message being conveyed."

I have said for a long time, “Any white person born before 1954 is prejudiced.”

"Based on our “white” past history of negative valuation of peoples -"

"I noticed that many white clients would “value” people by how they looked and what they were wearing. I must say I never had a black client rate a person on looks or clothes. So what you say?"
***********************
That's all I want to supply for now. By themselves, they may appear innocent observations, but the implication is that whites are less sensitive, less caring, and the source of nearly all racial bias. That's what I see when I step back and look at the whole picture.



posted on Apr, 24 2006 @ 10:59 AM
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Thanks.

I did read these statements and I guess I just see them as containing truth and not particularly ragging on white people. I mean many white people are insensitive. That's not to say that others aren't as well, but I just think dw was speaking in terms of white and black racism and focusing on the white failing to embrace equality, historically.

"Even when prompted by good motives, white's screw up."

This statement is true, but can also be said of any race, religion, ethnicity or origin.

That's my take anyway.



posted on Apr, 24 2006 @ 11:42 AM
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You're probably right. Its just me. Too much caffeine. Sorry, dw.

Back on topic, what does immigration have to do with racism? We're getting closer to another racial era with the border problems, imo. I don't think there is any inherent racism between Mexicans and others, but if the gov't doesn't take some positive steps soon to adddress the border problem, then an economic issue will manifest itself as a racial one.



posted on Apr, 24 2006 @ 11:59 AM
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jsobecky.
I agree with you that the immigration situation does need addressing before really bad things begin to happen. To say the situation may become tense is something of an understatement.

Just a quick question for whomever wishes to answer it. I am curious, when did using the n-word become a complimentary term and non-derogatory? When I was growing up, it was never a term used unless you wanted a fight on your hands. I find the word to this day to be, at least to me, highly inflammatory, and certainly not one to be used as a term of, for lack of a better term, endearment; or at least affection. Used as a defense against racism, perhaps. A sign that you refuse to acknowledge anyones stated superiority? The word would seem to me to have too many negative connetations to be used in that fashion. Playing into the stereotype if you will.

I suppose it would, like many other terms, depend largely upon context, and who was using the term. Still, the word just has far too many bad vibes connected to it, IMO, to be used in anything but a negative fashion.



posted on Apr, 24 2006 @ 12:39 PM
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Just a quick question for whomever wishes to answer it. I am curious, when did using the n-word become a complimentary term and non-derogatory? When I was growing up, it was never a term used unless you wanted a fight on your hands. I find the word to this day to be, at least to me, highly inflammatory, and certainly not one to be used as a term of, for lack of a better term, endearment; or at least affection.


Well as i already have stated i have a friend who i have known for years who is black. Now usually that wouldn't be important but for this discussion it is. Anyway he often refers to me as 'cracker' and i have used the phrase "what's up 'n-word'" more than once. These phrases are never meant in a nasty way, it's like a joke against racists if that makes sense.

Anyway i think words are words, intent and emotion is what gives a word power.

Maybe us brits should start getting really upset at being called 'limeys'.

[edit on 24-4-2006 by ImaginaryReality1984]



posted on Apr, 24 2006 @ 04:43 PM
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Does anyone think there will come a time in our lives when it wont be "white people" or "black people?"....Just people



posted on Apr, 24 2006 @ 10:39 PM
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First of all,

I would like to say thank you to police_officer339 for his wonderful compliment. I surely will keep on nagging to get people to talk about race-relations civilly!


It is my goal to have a great discussion about the issues of race across the board. As we are beginning to discover, that race and racism is not only just White-Black, or vice-versa. It happens on so many other levels. And a special thanks goes out to danigirl1974 for her contribution about Native Americans. She asked a very fair question and I wish she would come back and ask more. I also wish that she would explain a little more about Native American culture and enlighten us about her tribe.

Everyone asked some very interesting questions today. All were very fascinating. And, as usual--in my War and Peace mode, I am going to answer a few issues that have caused me to think.


Originally quoted by seagull
Just a quick question for whomever wishes to answer it. I am curious, when did using the n-word become a complimentary term and non-derogatory? When I was growing up, it was never a term used unless you wanted a fight on your hands. I find the word to this day to be, at least to me, highly inflammatory, and certainly not one to be used as a term of, for lack of a better term, endearment; or at least affection. Used as a defense against racism, perhaps. A sign that you refuse to acknowledge anyones stated superiority? The word would seem to me to have too many negative connetations to be used in that fashion. Playing into the stereotype if you will.


seagull, it's kind of hard to explain. In our discussion of the "N-word" yesterday, Saphronia, Benevolent Heretic, donwhite, police_officer339, Imaginary Reality1984 and myself, among others were exploring the meaning of the word. We discussed the different ways that it could be used. It is true for some, the "n-word" is used in terms of a figure of speech between people as a form of joking and comraderie. However, for others, the "N-word" still has a negative effect because of its historical and figurative use.

I know that others will probably give their opinion, but for myself, I'm not one to use the word in such a jovial light. In my earlier posts, I had discussed how I felt the word was negative on many forms. But, I am open-minded enough to see that it depends on the personality of the person who uses it. And, if they use it, it is on their own conscience.

police_officer339 felt that the word still had its negative, disturbing and volatile connotations. As a result, it could be used to incite violence. For him, the use of the term is degrading for African-Americans and it should not be used.

Saphronia contributed that she uses the word as a form of joking and between friends, family. Imaginary Reality 1984 uses the "n-word" in the same capacity. To them, it is a figure of speech that can be implemented in terms of humor and friendship. And she discussed her relationship with the "n-word" in that capacity. Its meaning is different to her.

But in our conversation, Saphronia and I both came to the conclusion that the term can be used in a negative light when differentiating between Black people in terms of education, class, and region. And in this way, when Black people use the term against each other, it is upsetting because it causes in-fighting within the African-American community. With that being said, the "n-word" is in the "eye of the beholder" (Saphronia).

(I hope that this is right. Please people correct me if I am misconstruing your words!)

But, somehow, as I think about the discussion of the "n-word", I think that it has to do with the context. Some people can use the term and feel okay with it. It doesn't have the same type of meaning that it used to have. Other people, like myself, do not like the term and will not encourage others to use it. I am conflicted about its use because I really feel it is a word of disrespect. And because my relationship with the "n-word" is different, I feel that in my own way it is best not to use it or use it in academic situations in which its meaning is discussed. But, socially, I would not use it as a term of endearment because I don't see it that way.

But donwhite said something that was really interesting about the use of the "N-word". Perhaps, it is so that when Black people use it between each other, they are saying, "You can't hurt me any more with this word". And I think that this is a way to take the sting of its hurt away.

But, for myself, I wouldn't go out on the street and shout it.

P.S. Other people contribute to this. And it is okay to refute me. I was just trying to summarize everyone's post. And I do make mistakes, so clear things up.



posted on Apr, 24 2006 @ 10:49 PM
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I agree ceci and could not have said it better.



posted on Apr, 24 2006 @ 11:14 PM
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Again, police_officer339, you have my thanks and respect.


Originally quoted by jsobecky
donwhite, what's with all the negativity towards whites? Your posts are filled with those comments.


jsobecky,

As I read donwhite's posts, I truly think that he is taking a critical take of how he views race-relations from his point of view. And what is fascinating about each of his posts, is that he describes historically how Blacks and Whites have treated each other as he was growing up and has matured.

What I felt was poignant about donwhite's posts is that he has the insight to see the progress that African-Americans has made. But also at the same time, the unwillingness of some White people to recognize that aspect.

What resonated to me the most about his words is when he said that (some) white people can accept Black people, but never respect them. The reason that really held my attention is that in some places in the world, it is kind of true. In fact, it connects with my experiences in my extended relatives' towns. And seeing it through a Black woman's eyes, I think it's kind of relevant.

Because in my extended relatives' neck of the woods, Whites have not been so accepting. Blacks in town became self-sufficient and created a culture of their own. And this culture has happened for over one-hundred years (yes, it is hard to think about, but when examining my family tree--these issues continue to come up). But in modern times, it's not that the White folks in town aren't "polite". They are. But, it is a cold politeness that gets you in the Wal Mart and out the door . And sometimes, it is that same "cold politeness" that occurs when something embarrassing and potentially bad happens.

[I digress with a short story. In the Wal Mart in this little town situated within this "red" state, you have to walk through the metal detectors when you exit the store. My dad had his cell phone on his belt. I was walking with him. As we walked through the metal detectors, it went off. It was one of those "rubber-necker" situations in which everyone checking out stopped and turned to look at the door.

When they saw my dad and me, some shook their heads. My bag and purse was checked. My dad's bag was checked. We walked through the metal detectors again. They went off. It was then, my dad asked what might set it off. The lady (she was one of the Wal Mart "greeters") let us stand there. We walked through the metal detectors a third time. I got to stand to the side because it wasn't me. But after my dad removed everything in his pockets, he walked through the metal detectors a fourth time. He found out it was his cell phone setting off the metal detectors.

After all that mess, the lady said in a steely voice with a small smile on her face, "Ya'll come back now."

My Dad and I walked out not saying a word toward the car where my mother and sister were.]

I think that donwhite is allowed to have his different point of view of White people. It shows that people can be individuals within one race. It's like Saphronia, HarlemHottie and myself. We are three different types of Black women. We may agree on some issues. But we disagree on others. And in the same way that you might disagree with donwhite, I think it is also compelling that he and you do agree on some issues as well.

I, for one, value his contributions because it gives me another perspective on race-relations. It hints at things that I have known from my past. But, it gives me insight into how Blacks and Whites treated each other historically through Kentucky. I find his words educational, if not informative. In each post, he intricately explains some of the things from a White perspective that my Dad and I have discussed many times over the years. Through his words, I am able to get a picture of why things might have happened the way they did. Of course, I learned that sometimes history can paint an ugly portrait of how race-relations were--and still might be.

It is fair that you ask him the question of why he is being critical. But also recognize that like you have your perceptions of race, so does he. And maybe sometimes both of you may agree. I think that in your conversations with each other contribute to the fruitfulness of the larger question of race-relations. It is a part of reflection and inquiry about how individual White people can view race differently. As well as other races view race differently.

But in all of this, I cannot forget the thoughts and words of Benevolent Heretic. I am also grateful for her contribution to the thread. Her words have also been insightful because she describes her experiences with race. And through her words, I am able to see how she perceives race-relations and how she adapts to different situations. These experiences also shed light on the meticulous manner that race is played out. She also presents a different point of view of how White people view race and that perspective is also great in bridging the gap towards understanding.

So, I don't think of donwhite, Benevolent Heretic, nor your words as being negative. I see them as contributing to the threads that make up race-relations in America. It is okay to doubt, to criticize, to wonder and to ask. And it is also good to inform and to educate. And, if it does seem negative, it helps one to examine one's self about how they see their own race, but other races--in a reflexive manner.















[edit on 25-4-2006 by ceci2006]



posted on Apr, 24 2006 @ 11:44 PM
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Orginally quoted by police_officer339
Does anyone think there will come a time in our lives when it wont be "white people" or "black people?"....Just people


I would certainly hope so. I would just like to be an American, like everyone else. However, on some days, I receive treatment that doesn't make me feel as such. Or when I see laws passed by either the State legislature or in Congress or current events on television, sometimes my emotions convey the hopelessness of the situation.

But on most days, I continue to take a proactive approach to getting to know people and talking with them on a daily basis. And from those conversations in the "real world" as well as the "Internet" world, I learn and grow from each encounter. These things make me fascinated by the aspects of just being "a person" instead of a "Black person".

It would be controversial to say, that perhaps eighty to hundred years from now, there might be the concept of being "just people". I would think by then, that we would have explored space. Or discovered a new life form on another planet. Although that might be weird to say now, it is interesting to think about the concept of discovering other life forms in other parts of the universe. If that happens, we would be forced just to be "people". We wouldn't see those divisions anymore, because we would be to the "other life form" as "earthlings".

However, in a "real world" perspective, race belies the differences within us. It would have to take a big initiative on everyone's part to work toward this new notion of just "being people". But in the same way, there are sacrifices when you give yourself toward the concept of being "just people". People would have to accept each other equally. Our cultures would be valued for the benefits they donate to the entire society. Fear would be erased. And prejudice would be a thing of the past.

But until we give up the historical leanings of the antiquated perceptions of race, I think it will never happen. That makes me sad to say, but there are still some people in the world that are set in their ways. And they would like to keep things the way they are for terms of "self-preservation". And until the "self-presevationists" are willing to give up their fight to hold on to the past, then we will still see the problems that we have in terms of relating to one another.

These are just my ideas. But it is something that I will continue to think about and contribute to in the coming days.

P.S. Other people chime in your thoughts to police_officer339's question! I would love to hear what others have to say about this.



[edit on 25-4-2006 by ceci2006]



posted on Apr, 25 2006 @ 03:58 AM
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Originally quoted by jsobecky
Back on topic, what does immigration have to do with racism? We're getting closer to another racial era with the border problems, imo. I don't think there is any inherent racism between Mexicans and others, but if the gov't doesn't take some positive steps soon to adddress the border problem, then an economic issue will manifest itself as a racial one.


The question of immigration is a rather difficult for me. Because whenever it comes up, I feel the complexity of emotions when negotiating the law and thinking about the people who are behind the law.

Let me first say that the law is the law. And I believe that people ought to apply legally. However, the immigration process is messed up. They need to restructure it.

When it comes to the racial question, the first race that comes to mind are Latinos and Latinas. And when it came down to it, I think about my own race as an African-American. In the past days, I have been thinking a lot about the Dred Scott decision. I have also been thinking about the right to vote. And African-Americans, also have a past that could indefinitely term us as "illegal immigrants" too.

We were taken over the border via Plymouth, New York and from Brazil. Smuggled in like human cargo. We toiled in the fields, chopping cane, picking cotton, fruit and corn. We worked in "sweat shops" sewing clothes for the Master; we were nannies to the Master's children; and we also manufactured the Master's things. We were packed into lodgings four or five families at a time--if we were lucky enough to be with our families.

Because unlike the undocumented workers of today, our families were forcibly broken apart and sold to different places. And to this day, those searching for their relatives have a hard time finding out what happened to different branches of the family. However, undocumented workers have to leave their families in order to make a better life.

And yet in the past, one of the Founding Fathers, Thomas Jefferson thought enough of us to brand us "three-fifths" of a person while having Sally Hemmings as a mistress. Now that is one of the greatest hypocrisies of all time.

So, although as a Black person, I feel conflicted about this issue as well. Can Blacks criticize illegal immigration? Sure they can. It is their First Amendment Right. But, the racist intent in which immigration is being pushed is going too far. However, racism has always had its place with the law. As I think about it, the Fifteenth Amendment was the first attempt to recognize Black people as citizens of this country. But, just because the rule of law stated we could vote, does not mean that we could vote socially and politically.

As donwhite mentioned in one of his posts, this is where the racist intent goes through. Immediately when Blacks got the right to vote, that's when "grandfather clauses" popped up. But for Blacks who were slaves and had grandfathers imported from Africa, how could we vote? In effect, it was saying that "only naturalized citizens could vote if they could prove their heritage and geneology".

Is that not the same thing with the children of undocumented workers being born in America?

The current news surrounding illegal immigration is using this same type of thinking in order to prevent "a brown race" from becoming citizens. Surely, in a legal standpoint, they broke the law. And the corporations--yet again--employed them to do the same type of labor that slaves once had done. But like African-Americans back in times of slavery, they too have the same committment to enriching their family.

And like African-Americans, South American people were "effectively" imported by "human smuggling" over the border.

And also like Blacks, they face the brunt of racism because they are in America, but not "of America".

And problematically, as the law had kept African Americans from being afforded rights. Latinos from South of the Border are not being afforded rights. And also in the same vein, they, as we Blacks were and still are in a way, are being exploited.

That's why I said in the immigration thread, "We have to Eliminate the Gringos", that we have to separate the law from the people. You can get mad at the law being unfairly applied. But please do not take it out indiscriminately against the people. For the people who are undocumented, the law will have its place. But, for the people themselves, they do not deserve our hate and prejudice because there are too many forces that are complicit in their employment, some of which are the corporation and the government.

What are some other views of racism and immigration?




[edit on 25-4-2006 by ceci2006]



posted on Apr, 25 2006 @ 07:05 AM
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OK, Ceci2006, here goes. Yes, I do believe one day in the United States the idea of racism will be no more. Rosa Parks, by her refusal to be something she was not, by her being herself at her best, put the first crack in an unjust law. The people who sat at the Woolwoth's lunch counter did the same. When I think about it, it seems unbelievable that we actually achieved civil rights laws, such was the harshness of racism and supremacy. But it took a great leader to bring everyone together, enter Dr MLK. Oh, his words are sweet to hear! He brought hope, he brought strength, he brought power to people, and nonviolently. And this came from religion, spilled over into everyone's hearts regardless. And let us not forget what he had to say about war. Sadly, nowadays religious talk nationally has been hijacked into discussing gay marriage, abortion, evolution, all ideas to bring people apart in all directions. Now, something else to keep in mind--the "colored" signs of old applied to any color, not just "black". The signs are gone legally, but I think they can still be found in people's minds.
People talk about outsourcing jobs to keep wages low, but I think what has been happening in this country has been "insourcing", letting undocumented workers enter to keep wages low. Laws re the employment of illegals are there, but not enforced. Economics, we are all influenced by it. You know, not having a job makes people do crazy things, like riot--one might tend to view the old Watts Riots as purely race based, but when big companies with good jobs left, poverty replaces. MLK talked about economic unjustness, too. Separate out the personal problem of racism from the government problem of illegal immigration.
We have come a long way in America, but we can do better. We have forgotten what it truly takes to be a great nation--coming together for our mutual benefit.
You and others here are trying to be your best, each day as you go out and face the world. That is what we must do, as an example to others. If MLK had known that he would never see his dream realized, he still would have dreamed and hoped and acted. So each of us must dream, hope, and act. I think we are doing that right now on the internet.



posted on Apr, 25 2006 @ 08:41 AM
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Redneck. Or "trailer trash" or "white trash".

I see them all the same. All 4 are (in my mind) terms that belittle a group of people who are thought of as 'less' by their own race. I doubt it's fun to be called any of these epithets in a serious way.

SO... to remove the pain and power that they hold, people who were once called by these names, have embraced them and use them as comic relief and terms of endearment. I recall the famous "You might be a redneck if..." set of endless jokes. And there's a very big threesome I've seen on Comedy Central (though I never stop to watch) of self-acclaimed rednecks telling jokes about themselves and other rednecks.

I dislike that whole thing about as much as I do the N-word adoption by black people. But since I'm not black and I'm not a redneck (although I did live in a mobile home once) I haven't adopted any of the terms and I don't use them except maybe in the privacy of a conversation between my husband and myself - where absolutely nothing is sacred.


Does anyone else think it's accurate to say that the R-word has been adopted by Jeff Foxworthy et al, much as the N-word has been adopted by Dave Chappelle et al?

[edit on 25-4-2006 by Benevolent Heretic]



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