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U.S. Air Force inventory in 2010?

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posted on Apr, 11 2006 @ 11:17 PM
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Anybody have any idea what the U.S. Air Force will look like in 2010?

What intrigues me is the state of the F-15C. Once the F-22A enters service, is it gone for good?




posted on Apr, 11 2006 @ 11:21 PM
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Nah the F-15 will be around for a bit longer than that. The Raptor will never be produced in the amounts needed to be a direct replacement.

ALso the current plan I have seen has the AESA equipped F-15's serving as backstops to the F-22's in the cruise missile defence role as well. If you coupled the long range of the AESA with say a extended range A2A missile, the platform would be able to engage targets at extreem long range and extend its viability for many years



posted on Apr, 12 2006 @ 06:27 AM
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That is an intresting question. With the shifts in thinking, we should be able to make some educated guesses about the future! For starters the treand to make the fleet smaller will cut the number of aircraft. We will also see a lot more multirole aircraft coming out such as the F-35 and the C-130 types.

I think the Bomber fleet will be very little changed from it's current state! A new heavy bomber would be nice, but the politics makes that uncertine!

Tim



posted on Apr, 12 2006 @ 08:10 AM
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There will be UCAVS lots and lots of UCAVS. There will robotic weapons of all kinds, land, sea and air.

America specializes in high tech force multipliers and will leverage that to its maximum.



posted on Apr, 12 2006 @ 08:21 AM
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what a fleet full of ucav's in 4 years?
hightly doubtful!!

you may have 1 (if your lucky) but ucav's will all be on the go from 2016+

to be honest i can't see too much happening by 2010, of course the f-22 will be in service - maybe a few new projects will be in the making, but the only new aircraft in operation will be the f-22!!

4 years isn't too long away, thats like 2002-2006 (present day), nothing too much as happened.












[edit on 12-4-2006 by st3ve_o]



posted on May, 23 2006 @ 06:40 AM
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Originally posted by ElTiante
There will be UCAVS lots and lots of UCAVS. There will robotic weapons of all kinds, land, sea and air.


I have to agree with st3ve_o! The shift over to an all UCAV force is decades away. The USAF is too conservitive to make such a radical leap so soon. Also, I not sure if the technology is ready for that yet.

Tim



posted on May, 23 2006 @ 08:27 AM
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You want a new bomber in 4 years? With all the red tape they have in the way now?
Back in the days of Johnson maybe, today? They'll be lucky have started looking for designs in 4 years if they announced it today. The new heavy bomber isn't expected until 2018 at the earliest.

The F-15s will be around until around 2020 the last I heard, maybe a little longer than that. They're the cruise missile defense, while the F-22 will be fighter/bomber defense.



posted on May, 23 2006 @ 12:57 PM
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Originally posted by ElTiante
There will be UCAVS lots and lots of UCAVS. There will robotic weapons of all kinds, land, sea and air.

America specializes in high tech force multipliers and will leverage that to its maximum.



I don't think that's gona happends... 4 years... as ghost said highly unlikely... They aren't even in priduction yet... only prototypes... X-class...



posted on May, 23 2006 @ 08:21 PM
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In Four years the F-22 will only have 2 more years left of production before its line is shutdown.

The F-35 will come on line.


Hopefully there will be real plans on a new bomber...but thats pretty unpredictable.

And hopefully a black aircraft will be released at some point in that gap.

There wont be fleets of UCAVS...but hopefully the AF can pick one design and go with it...possably the X-47.(?)



posted on May, 23 2006 @ 08:56 PM
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Why not just scrap the entire fleet and use the scrap metal to build Intergalactic warships capable of planetary bombardment?

(please don't throw flaming rocks at me).

Shattered OUT...



posted on May, 25 2006 @ 06:26 PM
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SweatmonicaIdo,

>>
Anybody have any idea what the U.S. Air Force will look like in 2010?
>>

It's 2008 that matters. After that, we will likely see a whiplash against the 'foreign militarism' (which is to say fruitless pursuit of a solution for Iraq with no sign of a /serious search for/ UBL).

In terms of force structure, it all depends on how badly the powers that be want to ramrod the F-35 through SDD and into production. If the GAO/CBO have their way, we won't buy a single airframe until ALL THREE variants have completed service testing. If Congress and the Air Farce are victorious, we will have the F-35A in service by 2010-2011 and the F-35B and C will cascade on from that (no matter how well or badly they do in IOTE/OPEVAL) just to maintain critical mass on the production economics.

Should the JSF be cleared for early production, you will see nearly all F-16Cs start to cascade down as active units give their blk.40/.50 to the Guard and things like CCIP and the Sniper + AGP-68V(9) upgrade program go byebye. The F-22 will also be capped at about 120-150 jets (less the amount needed for the 'wing fix' anyway). And the Saudis and JASDF will go elsewhere (probably to the Flubber and F-35 respectively) for their new generation Air Superiority followon.

If that fails to happen (say we cannot use American tax dollars to guarantee overseas pricing and/or someone wakes up in time to prevent VLO from being whored to the world), then the F-22 may be a production reprieve and actually come closer to the 450 jets, MINIMUM required.

While it is likely that the F-16E will be purchased in small numbers and the USAF will actually begin to OBEY THE LAW which _requires_ 1/3rd of all strike assets to be _Unmanned_ by 2010.

www.fas.org...

Of course being lying sacks of excrement interested only in their own golf-cart careers, the Blue Suit Conspiracy has never let anything as minor as following Congressional mandates effect their budgeting process.

>>
What intrigues me is the state of the F-15C. Once the F-22A enters service, is it gone for good?
>>

Relative to the F-15C upgrade aka 'Golden Eagle'; a lot will depend on how they are used. Homeland Defense is clearly a joke and has been since the early 1980's. On 9/11, the F-15s came 1150nm south from Otis at sub-Mach, rather lackadaisically while the reality remains that a single PAC-3 battery (where once we had 20 NIKEs) could have likely saved at least the second buildings occupants, no problem.

Similarly, defensive CMD is more about sensor look angles and refined coherency against clutter when searching for ISAR maps but frankly, I don't think MP-RTIP level technology for an APG-63V(3) is going to be nearly ready in time (Brick-Tile-Button) for a _cheap_ upgrade and as missileers, it's likely going to be wiser to go with a full buy of AIM-120D and then layer the cross track look into an aerostat (JLENS) or limited F-22 type force. Even an E-2D with the APS-18 antenna should be easier on the pocket book than a major frontend upgrade of 200-250 Eagles. Frankly, assuming progress continues to be steady, ATL and THEL will be the driving CM _and_ ATBM defenders by 2015 (dollars per shot plus fast reengage) anyway.

OCA, well, since the mid-90's whenever the call goes out for penetrating air to air, it's always to the Blk.50 Viper community. Smaller baseline signature plus a working towed decoy, a high speed modem and a suppress-on-contact (HARM) capability just beats Rodan all to pieces for total depth of engagement sphere and 'hot pursuit' options especially. Though total volume remains less, a recent APG-68 will also equal or better an older APG-63. I doubt this will get any better with Eagle being in such a state of physical decay (and largely unable to drop IAM as the Raptor can), the only real question then being whether the F-35 will assume the mantle of _battlespace_ (A2A and DEAD) dominance as a close escort or if the F-16 will simply leave the old Weasel mission behind to become a 180-220nm HSARM shooter while the stealth assets try to avoid direct terminal threats with GBU-39.

My bet is on the latter.

Lastly, the real power is all in the brass. Golden Eagle was Roche's idea back when everybody still wanted the 380 airframe Raptor purchase. He knew it wouldn't happen (apparently) but couldn't convince anyone so the update was 'officially not sponsored by the USAF'. 180 jet production cap later, Mike Moseley is on the stick and it's suddenly an option whose 'roadmap is being finalized'. Aka: Hurry up and wait for a new administration with a best and worst case solution.

CONCLUSION:
I think that that air defenses are about to take such a monumental jump in lethality (most of it Eurotrash and PRC origined) that even the notion of a 'Shotgun' or HAVCAP close-in conventional escort on the friendly side of a fence or support jammer is going to be highly questionable. That alone will kill the F-15 as a primary A2A platform. As a strike asset, the advent of small munitions (GBU-38/39 and VSM) will obviate even the F-15E as a heavyweight interdictor while again, the lack of PDF and HARM capability limits either platforms ability to penetrate to the depth that an F-16 or 18 can penetrate. With similar numbers, from both the Albino and Mudhen sides of the fence, the money just won't be there for an upgrade to be considered a wise business case by Raytheon or HuNor. If DEWS and high performance autonomous S2A fires come about, cheap UCAVs will have to follow, no matter what is felt about JSF. And that puts the F-15 in a postion of 'two of everything = twice the loser' on a maintenance tail basis of supporting a decrepit jet for homeland Anti-Airliner Defense and Expeditionary CMD. Both of which can be done better/cheaper with S2A systems. As such, I see
GE as a Bombcat equivalent, 'political', Lipstick The Pig move to appease the Ego Drivers until it's too late.



posted on May, 25 2006 @ 11:59 PM
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Well, Super Hornet also is not as worse as some people think if you have watched its maneuver video



posted on May, 26 2006 @ 04:41 AM
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i think that in 2010 the us air force will look much the same with the main differences being that current develouopment programs will be 4 years further on than they are now, the f-22 will be in wider use than it is now and there will be a few new designs being develouped ie new tanker and maybe a few companies might be lookign at a new long range, high speed stealth bomber.

justin



posted on May, 28 2006 @ 05:35 AM
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The JSF will be the last manned fighter jet. They will be the deadliest things in the Sky with that radar and stealth. The radar is still classified but you could see the enemy hundreds of miles away fire missiles before they even know your up ther with them. It will replace the Harrier jets too. It's totally next generation of piloted craft.

Once they get up to about mach 6 or 7 maybe higher with next generation jet propulsion they will have to be unmanned. However that is at least a decade away but the A.I. is nearly ready to all the work.



posted on May, 28 2006 @ 10:14 AM
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Originally posted by emile
Well, Super Hornet also is not as worse as some people think if you have watched its maneuver video


I agee, it's a very good plane when it comes to agility, and it's a good multi-role aircraft...



posted on May, 28 2006 @ 10:50 AM
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I think around 2020-2025 is when we are going to see some interesting changes in the USAF. Thats when I think its likely we will see the UCAVs taking a much greater role in the Airforce.



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