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Mary Magdalene the Mother of Jesus

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posted on Apr, 3 2006 @ 05:01 PM
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Mary Magdalene was the Mother of Jesus. Here's why.
There are the four gospels. Matthew, Mark, Luke, John. 3 of the 4 state there were Mary's at the cross. The only one that doesn't is Luke.

Matthew 27:56 "Among which was Mary Magdalene, and Mary the Mother of James and Joses, and the mother of Zebedee's children."
This is two Mary's. One being Mary M and the other being Mary, the wife of Zebedee. Zebedee's children were James and Joses. Notice. No mention of the Mother of Jesus

Mark 15:40 "There were also women looking on afar off, among whom was Mary Magdalene, and Mary the mother of James the less, and of Joses and Salome"
Again, the same two Mary's, and no mention of the mother of Jesus

The next passage is where the confusion stems from.

John 19:25 "Now there stood by the cross of Jesus, his mother, and his mother's sister.."
Now let's stop there. Two Mary's. The mother of Jesus, Mary, and her sister. Who is this sister? Now, the rest of the passage.
"....Mary the wife of Cleophas, and Mary Magdalene."
now look at this passage again.
"....and his mother's sister, Mary the wife of Cleophas....."
One more time the whole passage.
John 19:25 " Now there stood by the cross of Jesus, his mother, and his mother's sister, Mary the wife of Cleophas, and Mary Magdalene."
Two Mary's. Mary Magdalene, and Mary the wife of Cleophas"

This would mean the Mother of Jesus, being Mary Magdalene, had a sister named Mary. How is this possible? Cleopas was Joseph's brother, hence Jesus's uncle. That would make the wife of Cleopas Mary's sister. Mary, the wife of Cleopas was Jesus's aunt.

To further add to this. All four gospels put Mary Magdalene at the sepulchre. Never once, do they mention the Mother of Jesus at the sepuchre. Now Jesus's mother followed Jesus throughout his ministry. Why would she not be at the sepulchre? She was. Mary Magdalene. Jesus hid this fact, because he didn't want harm to come to his mother.

Magdalene is defined as grand, elevated, magnificent. Source? John Hertel Holy Bible, KJV, School and library reference edition, 1968 edition.

Now many incorrectly think that she was Mary of Magdelene, being from Magdala. Not once does the bible refer to her like this. Only as Mary Magdalene.



Mod Edit: title

[edit on 4-4-2006 by kinglizard]




posted on Apr, 3 2006 @ 05:22 PM
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Did you meet up with Bill today?
Does that mean mary mother of jesus was once a whore?



posted on Apr, 3 2006 @ 05:26 PM
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No, I didn't see Bill. I explain on my thread about Bill.
Where does it say Mary Magdalene was a whore?



posted on Apr, 3 2006 @ 05:45 PM
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I'd like to ask and point out a couple of things.

First of all, there is no scriptural reference to Mary of Magdalene being a harlot, whore or adulterer. This was an assumption that arose in the 9th century by a pope (I can't remember the details, but can expand on them if anyone's interested), but later the Catholic church recanted this teaching.

Stompk, what version of the Bible were you using? In the NIV, your passages read as:

Matt 27:56

Among them were Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James and Joses, and the mother of Zebedee's sons.


Mark 15:40

40Some women were watching from a distance. Among them were Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James the younger and of Joses, and Salome


John 19:25

25Near the cross of Jesus stood his mother, his mother's sister, Mary the wife of Clopas, and Mary Magdalene.


If you note, there is nothing to indicate that those other people were part of the list of women at the cross with Christ. The passage from John states four people, Jesus' mother, His mother's sister, The wife of Clopas, and Mary Magdalene. There's no indication I can see that the author of John listed two people, then decided to explain who Christ's mother's sister was, then His mother.

The Adam Clark Commentary actually notes this in its commentary on the passage from Matthew, and mentions that there are 4 remarkable women by the name of Mary described in the Gospels:


1. MARY the Virgin, wife of JOSEPH. 2. MARY SALOME, her sister, wife of Cleopas, John 19:25. 3. MARY MAGDALENE, or MARY of Magdala; and, 4. MARY, the sister of Martha and Lazarus, John 11:1.
source

Mark 16:9 even goes on to say when Christ first appeared to Mary Magdalene, and that he relieved her of 7 demons.



posted on Apr, 3 2006 @ 06:18 PM
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Mary was a virgin at the time of the birth of Jesus. There is nothing that states she remained a virgin, not that it matters. The evil spirits in Mary could have been there because the Devil knew she was the mother of Jesus. There is nothing that says it was the first time Jesus met her.

Furthermore, when Jesus casts the 7 devils out of Mary called Magdalene, she is the only Mary mentioned present. Jesus's mother and his brethren then couldn't reach him. Suggesting again, that Mary Magdalene was the only Mary there.

I respectfully disagree about you interpretation of John 19:25. If it was four different women, it would have read "mother of Jesus, and her sister, and Mary wife of Cleophas, and Mary Magdalene. And why only the two Mary's mentioned in the other passages? What happens to Jesus's mother after the crucifixion? Never is she mentioned again. Only Mary Magdelene, and the other Mary. Why would Jesus's mother never be mentioned again?

Pope Gregory is the one who spread the rumor about Mary being a whore. Was this to throw people off track? Why would someone who supposedly knew the scriptures so well, make such a claim about someone who Jesus obviously loved deeply?
I'm using KJV.

If Mary Magdalene was from Magdala, why wouldn't she be reffered to as Mary of Magdala, like Jesus of Nazereth?



posted on Apr, 3 2006 @ 06:25 PM
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Intetresting take. It makes everything I thought about Jesus's relationship with Mary Magdaline feel kinda dirty.

But what of the rest of the verse?

John 19:25 Meanwhile, standing near the cross of Jesus were his mother, and his mother's sister, Mary the wife of Clopas, and Mary Magdalene. 26 When Jesus saw his mother and the disciple whom he loved standing beside her, he said to his mother, "Woman, here is your son." 27 Then he said to the disciple, "Here is your mother." And from that hour the disciple took her into his own home.

None of the other books mention any conversation between Jesus and the Marys during the crucifixion.



posted on Apr, 3 2006 @ 07:29 PM
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Ah, the mysterious beloved desciple. It's amazing to me that in order to fit the theory that Mary Magdalene was the wife of Jesus and the beloved disciple, they overlook the fact that Jesus called him a son.
I submit that Joseph of Arimathea was the father of Jesus. That is why Pilate let him take the body of Jesus. The beloved disciple was a son of Joseph, but from another woman. Since Joseph was the husband of Mary, this would have been a huge no-no. But since Joseph only took Mary as his wife because she was pregnant with Jesus, and she wasn't married (also a big no-no), they drifted apart, and Joseph had a son with another woman. During this time, Mary could've recieved the seven devils. Now this would have been a brother of Jesus, and a good reason why he loved him so much. There are also reports of the disciple being younger, which fits. Joseph of Arimathea was a Jew, which fits too. Mary didn't know until Joseph revealed this, but would've understood, because Joseph saved her from certain. The woman at the well could've been the mistress of Joseph.

Another thing to debunk the Da Vinci Code theory. I liked the book by the way, and thought it was a great read. It also caused a lot of people to open up the bible again.

When Leonardo painted the Last Supper, he used models as his subjects. They were all men. Why would he use a man to paint Mary Magdalene. Interesting fact. His first model was Jesus. He chose a young man of about 19 years. It took him about 6 years of painting, until he got to the last subject, Judas. Through the permission of the King, he got a prisoner to portray him. Come to find out, it was the same man that Da Vinci used to paint Jesus, six years later!



posted on Apr, 4 2006 @ 07:48 AM
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Nobody wants to debate this. It's funny. Everyone wants to jump on the Jesus was married to the whore bandwagon, but nobody is interested in the truth? I guess it's solved, just like that. Mary Magdalene was the mother of Jesus.



posted on Apr, 4 2006 @ 08:10 AM
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interesting, some say she was his wife...so Jesus married his mother. hehehe

Gods Peace

dalen



posted on Apr, 4 2006 @ 10:21 AM
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Originally posted by stompk
Nobody wants to debate this. It's funny. Everyone wants to jump on the Jesus was married to the whore bandwagon, but nobody is interested in the truth? I guess it's solved, just like that. Mary Magdalene was the mother of Jesus.


Don't flatter yourself. More is coming; I just have been rather busy in real life.

As a starter, though, your analysis of John 19:25 stems from the English translations of the Bible. If that's the case, your claim is that those who translated the Bible believed Mary Magdalene was Jesus' mother, but for some reason concealed it. The Greek language has different grammatical rules and trends than does English. Yes, the word "kai" is used between Jesus' mother and her sister and between the other two Marys as well, but not in between. However, the first two were family members, and were grouped together, while the other two were friends and followers, who were grouped together.

We have this trend in English as well. For instance, I could say something is like comparing apples and oranges, peas and carrots. I could also say, "Here is my sister and brother-in-law, my aunt, my uncle and his wife. Does that mean I'm saying my sister is my aunt, my brother-in-law is my uncle, and my sister his wife? Though the language trend is not common today, it is not unheard of. We cannot make assumptions based on something of a linguistic nature without looking at other evidence supporting it. If all that's there is the lack of an "and" when listing two groups which are different types of people in their relation to Jesus, there is very little reason to believe it, except wanting to believe it.

Brooke Foss Westcott, a Biblical scholar from the 19th century, contends that Mary's sister is Salome, the wife of Zebedee, and the mother of James and John. This, to me, makes more sense than the first commentary I quoted because how often (unless you're George Foreman) do you name all your children with the same name? Westcott states,


This connection of St. John with the mother of the Lord helps explain the incident which follows .... The omission of the name of Salome, on this supposition, falls in with John's usage as to his brother and to himself.


If you want to know more about Westcott, you can read the wiki article here.



posted on Apr, 4 2006 @ 10:48 AM
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From my reading of the NT KJV, I believe that Mary Magdelene was Martha's sister, right? Their brother, Lazarus, is the one Jesus raised from the dead. Was Lazarus Jesus' brother-in-law, or brother? I say neither. All the NT says about Lazarus is he was 'beloved of Jesus'.

Mary Magdelene was, as Jake pointed out, first presented to Jesus when he cast out seven demons from her. She became a beloved disciple, much to the chagrine of Peter.

Also, as Jesus carries the cross to His crucifixion, he meets 'His afflicted mother', and Veronica wipes His face with a towel, as His countenance is marred by blood, and sweat, and dirt, and spittle. 'His afflicted mother' is not called by name, and who is Veronica?



posted on Apr, 4 2006 @ 10:56 AM
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First. The followers of Moses living in Judea in the First Century CE spoke Aramaic. (I assume the word “Jew” comes from Judea?) Most people accept that Jesus (in Greek, Joshua in Hebrew) was born in 4 BCE. Or 8 BCE. A lot of people accept that Jesus was crucified between 30 and 33 CE. Not counting Paul’s writings, the oldest book of the New Testament is Mark. Written in Greek around 55-60 CE.

I think Jerome’s Vulgate in Latin is the oldest document purporting to record the sayings of Jesus. About the early 5th century, CE. Regrettably, as all the 50 copies of Constantine’s bible are lost to the ages so also is the first work of Jerome. Most of Constantine’s bibles were probably burned by the Crusaders. The Wycliffe bible was the first translated into English around 1380 CE. The KJV followed in 1609. The NIV was first published in 1973 and 1978.

Second. My point? How much reliability can we Germanic speakers put on the writings which were spoken in a different root tongue - Semitic - and in a wholly different culture and historical setting? Let’s face it, what we have is spoken Aramaic recalled orally for a generation, then put into written Greek then into classical Latin and a millennia later, put into Elizabethan English and finally another 600 years pass, and put into modern English. And you want to argue nuances? C’mon. Don’t you agree we have more of the translator’s own thinking than we ever had of the original words or thoughts?

In the 1970s and early 1980s, there was a scholarly study known as the Jesus Project. It was tasked to decide what we have in the Holy Bible that is reliably the sayings of Jesus. About 30 scholars from a variety of Christian backgrounds and maybe some Jewish people - I forget - were involved. “Scholars” as I use it means to me, a person who makes his living discoursing with others. They voted with the white ball black ball and a red ball method. White for yes, black for no, and red for not certain.

There was only one partial quote from the Sermon on the Mount that got the necessary majority of white balls. At the same time an unrelated survey was made of seminarians around the country. One of the questions asked if the respondent believed in God? Surpassingly, at least to some, 10% of the respondents said “no.” So what did the owners and operators of the seminaries do? Cancel the Jesus Project and ban further surveys. Hey! The First Amendment applies only to public institutions.

[edit on 4/4/2006 by donwhite]



posted on Jul, 26 2007 @ 07:45 AM
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Well, after a year or so, I have found someone who actually researched this.
Great article, with footnotes and everything
Mary Madgalene is the Mother Of Jesus.



posted on Jul, 27 2007 @ 12:46 PM
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Nobody finds this important? Everyone thinks they are so right, they will continue to teach mis-interpretations?



posted on Jul, 27 2007 @ 06:42 PM
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Other gospels (and looking at the text in the original Greek) clear this up: Mary Magdalene was not Mary the wife of Joseph.

Mary has been mentioned throughout the gospel texts from the very beginning of each of the books. She's a central part of the story. Jesus refers to her as "mother". Mary Magdaline is only one of the witnesses and is described in Luke 8:2-


And it came to pass afterward, that he went throughout every city and village, preaching and shewing the glad tidings of the kingdom of God: and the twelve [were] with him,

And certain women, which had been healed of evil spirits and infirmities, Mary called Magdalene, out of whom went seven devils,

And Joanna the wife of Chuza Herod's steward, and Susanna, and many others, which ministered unto him of their substance.


If he had healed his mother of "seven devils", this would have been a significant story for the Bible. Mark also mentions that Mary Magdaline was healed of seven devils.

Finally, Matthew and Luke spend a great deal of their writing on the family of Jesus and on Mary and the Annunciation and so forth. Niether of them says she was born in Magdala or was known as "magdaline", and niether mentions the bit about the seven devils.

So Mary, his mother, is one of a group at the cross but he does not appear to her after his death. He does, however, to Mary Magdaline (and notice that when he addresses MM, he doesn't call her "Mother". He does call Mary wife of Joseph "mother", however.

[edit on 27-7-2007 by Byrd]



posted on Jul, 28 2007 @ 07:53 AM
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"And certain women, which had been healed of evil spirits and infirmities, Mary called Magdalene, out of whom went seven devils"

The key here is that is says Mary called Magdalene. Mary called the certain women, out of whom went seven devils, Magdalene.
Magdalene is plural for the women from Magdala.,


That Mary Magdalene was the mother of Jesus may strike some readers as shocking, since the figure of Mary Magdalene, as Mary the harlot, is one of the most popular and colorful of Christian hagiography; but the gospels know nothing about Mary Magdalene as Mary the harlot.

Source



posted on Jul, 29 2007 @ 01:13 PM
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Originally posted by stompk
"And certain women, which had been healed of evil spirits and infirmities, Mary called Magdalene, out of whom went seven devils"

The key here is that is says Mary called Magdalene. Mary called the certain women, out of whom went seven devils, Magdalene.
Magdalene is plural for the women from Magdala.,


Actually, it's not plural. It just means "the woman of Magdala." Magdala is on the west shores of Lake Tiberius, more than a day's journey from Nazareth.
www.sacred-texts.com...

Luke says that Mary lived in Nazareth and it was there that the Annunciation occurred. So her name would be Mary Nazarene - "Mary of Nazareth." This is where her parents lived (Nazareth) and where Joseph found her.

And if she had devils in her then or later, she would not have been pure enough to be the vessel for Jesus' incarnation. That very fact (possession by devils) would have called his divninity into question.

[edit on 29-7-2007 by Byrd]



posted on Jul, 30 2007 @ 12:55 PM
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Actually, my 1968 Hertel Standard Reference bible has
Magdalene defined as
tower; or grand, elevated, magnificent.



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