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Scientists make water run uphill

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posted on Mar, 30 2006 @ 05:56 AM
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www.msnbc.msn.com...

This is really neat,a simple observation can lead to future cooling idea's.




posted on Mar, 30 2006 @ 09:49 AM
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That is so incredibly amazing. Man... who woulda thought water running up? Makes me realize, anything can happen... we just havnt figured it out yet :/



posted on Mar, 30 2006 @ 07:06 PM
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great find, this will probably be put to good ues



posted on Mar, 30 2006 @ 08:18 PM
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Interesting. Basically what they are doing is making a droplet of water ride towards the path of least resistance on a pillow of steam. It makes sense that this would happen.

I don't really see any practicle application that is obvious though. I don't really see how this can be used in a heat pump for instance, though I'm sure that I just lack the imagination atm to really imagine such a device.

Cool find



posted on Mar, 31 2006 @ 06:15 PM
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More water going uphill:
here
here
and here



posted on Mar, 31 2006 @ 11:08 PM
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i thought I had read something about this a long while ago when I was younger... Either I must have misread, or this is old news made new... or something. I wish I could remember where I heard something like that.



posted on Mar, 31 2006 @ 11:15 PM
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I learned another way to make water go against gravity, when I was a kid.


It's a fun thing to teach your kids too..
Run your tap, so there is just a very thin stream coming out.
Get a comb, and run it through your hair.
Place the comb near the running stream of water.
Voila! You can make it do a U-turn! Or even guide it right out of the sink..
Simple, but a fun lesson in the effects of electrical fields!



posted on Apr, 1 2006 @ 12:31 AM
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Originally posted by DarkHelmet
i thought I had read something about this a long while ago when I was younger... Either I must have misread, or this is old news made new... or something. I wish I could remember where I heard something like that.



you did read it about 15-20 years ago. they had a piece of silicon that had less surface tension along its length. when a water drop was placed on it it moved in the direction of the least surface tension, even if it was tilted up hill. or something to that effect



posted on Apr, 1 2006 @ 12:35 AM
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nvrmnd wrong thread

[edit on 1-4-2006 by sardion2000]



posted on Apr, 1 2006 @ 12:37 AM
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Well... I must have read about that, but I'm only 17, so I didn't read it that long ago... I just meant that I read it around the age of 9 or 10.




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