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Traiters Son: Iran 'Threat Is Real'

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posted on Mar, 29 2006 @ 02:20 AM
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this guy talking about irans nuclear program and how he defends it even tough hes not iranian and trys to act like one
he disgraced the people of iran and our country, biggest piece of *horsepuckey* ever known.



Reza Pahlavi, the eldest son of the Shah of Iran, said he is not against a U.S. military strike against Iran’s nuclear facilities – and did not defended his nation’s right to have nuclear technology.

Appearing with John McLaughlin on his show "One on One,” the 45-year-old heir to the Peacock Throne was asked: "Under what circumstances would you permit direct military action against Iran's nuclear infrastructure?”

He told McLaughlin: "I'm not against it for many reasons. As a nationalist, as a traiter, I could possibly think of a scenario which would involve a kind of military strikes on my country. And if that's my sentiment, I guarantee that's the sentiment of many Iranians.”

www.newsmax.com...



Mod Edit: Please site 2-3 para's only thanks
Mod Edit II: Please don't bypass censors


[edit on 3/29/06 by FredT]

[edit on 29-3-2006 by Mehran]

[edit on 29-3-2006 by Mehran]

[edit on 3/29/06 by FredT]




posted on Mar, 29 2006 @ 02:28 AM
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A traitor
Hardly, If anything he may be the one person that can pull Iran from its dangerous course. Restoring Iran to its pre-revolution status is hardly the work of a traitor but rather that of a patriot.

From his own site:


This is a critical moment in the history of my homeland. The Iran of my youth was a nation at peace with its neighbors and respected within the International community. Our economy was among the strongest in the region, and our people were prospering.

But twenty-two years ago, a catastrophe descended upon my homeland and reversed decades of progress.

Today, Iran has fallen into the abyss of: international isolation, an extremist government, high inflation, huge unemployment, and rampant corruption. The clerical regime brutally suppresses the fundamental human rights within Iran and is the leading exporter of hate and terror beyond its borders.

www.rezapahlavi.org...






[edit on 3/29/06 by FredT]

[edit on 3/29/06 by FredT]



posted on Mar, 29 2006 @ 02:31 AM
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i hate him sooooooo much!!! one day i want to go beat up the guy myself!. the royal family are the biggest S.O.B known in iranian history, it makes me mad even hearing his name
. FredT if your country can really spread democracy why not do it in Iran?, why is it it had to be iraq and not us?. thats all i want to know

[edit on 29-3-2006 by Mehran]



posted on Mar, 29 2006 @ 02:40 AM
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Originally posted by Mehran
i hate him sooooooo much!!! one day i want to go beat up the guy myself!. the royal family are the biggest S.O.B known in iranian history,


See now here I thought the biggest Iranian SOB was this dude:



Democracy in Iran? Yes its possible and the begining of such are there, however the Revolutionary council will not allow it to be and remain committed to thier agenda. Reza Pahlavi could be the one man who could bring this to Iran, If allowed by the fundamentalists in power.



posted on Mar, 29 2006 @ 02:45 AM
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Reza Pahlavi couldnt do a thing, people in iran want to see a democratic country but not with the royal power in control, i dont even know why that guy is still. i want to see the mullahs go to but how is democracy going to restored to iran with an air strike and not a full scale invasion?.



posted on Mar, 29 2006 @ 02:51 AM
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Originally posted by Mehran
i want to see the mullahs go to but how is democracy going to restored to iran with an air strike and not a full scale invasion?.


Time my friend time. Nobody is going to invade Iran. target its Nuclear weapons program, perhaps, but invade? We can barely control Bahgdad (and thats debateable) how would we be able to control Tehran with 3 times the population and the majority hostile to our presence?

In regards to getting rid of the Mullahs this book is of interest and the whole book is avalible online From Dictatorship

As I said before Reza knows that the time of his father is gone and the Pahlavi dynasty died with him. I doubt anybody would like to see the reincarnation of the Peacock Throne in way shape or form. But as the leader of a Democratic Iran, he has the drive and the Charisma for just such a thing.

[edit on 3/29/06 by FredT]



posted on Mar, 29 2006 @ 03:01 AM
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I can't find the link to it, but last year Bush stated we would come to the aid of the Iranian people if they showed a clear desire for democracy.

We wouldn't need a full scale invasion, much less an airstrike to assist with such a transition. There is a difference between the population of Iran than that of Iraq - meaning I don't think you would see significant infighting like what you see in Iraq today.


Also, the U.S. is funding pro democratic parties in Iran, an option we did not have with Iraq.

U.S. Congress seeks 100m for Iran Democratic Parties.

EDIT: Late Night Speeling


[edit on 29-3-2006 by crisko]



posted on Mar, 29 2006 @ 03:07 AM
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Originally posted by FredT

Originally posted by Mehran
i want to see the mullahs go to but how is democracy going to restored to iran with an air strike and not a full scale invasion?.


Time my friend time. Nobody is going to invade Iran. target its Nuclear weapons program, perhaps, but invade? We can barely control Bahgdad (and thats debateable) how would we be able to control Tehran with 3 times the population and the majority hostile to our presence?

In regards to getting rid of the Mullahs this book is of interest and the whole book is avalible online From Dictatorship

As I said before Reza knows that the time of his father is gone and the Pahlavi dynasty died with him. I doubt anybody would like to see the reincarnation of the Peacock Throne in way shape or form. But as the leader of a Democratic Iran, he has the drive and the Charisma for just such a thing.

[edit on 3/29/06 by FredT]


thats what i dont get, an air strike will just lead to more iranians fueled up for their hatred towards the U.S, an air strike could work or not but lets say if we started bombing troops down there than wouldnt that lead to an invasion?. Back than Iran was U.S. biggest and best ally and when the mullahs gained power we lost respect and no longer have that freindly relationship with western countries, i dont know what happened. this isn't like us persians we were never really a muslim type of people or had anything to do with arabs.

PS: i will try and read that link you gaved me called from dictatorship, thanks FredT

[edit on 29-3-2006 by Mehran]


Sep

posted on Mar, 29 2006 @ 06:56 AM
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The way for democracy for Iran is not through foreign elements, such as this "heir to the Throne ", but through domestic means and preferably through evolution and not revolution. People like Ganji, Karoubi, Khatami, Kadivar, Nouri, Nabavi, Abdi, Hajjarian and the like, movements such as those of the students and unionists are the ones to watch out for. Foreign "opposition movements", predominantly include the MKO and the monarchists. The MKO, a cult like former terrorist group, has next to no credibility in Iran since they backed Saddam during the Iran-Iraq war and the monarchists are a spent force. Backing these groups will only further the resentment of Iranians towards the US and will not help the relations.





[edit on 29-3-2006 by Sep]



posted on Mar, 29 2006 @ 07:11 AM
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Mehran

Some days ago I read that Akbar Ganji, one of Iran's most famous dissidents, was released from jail.


Do you think people like Ganji - and others, like the brave students in Tehran can move anything?

And BTW: Happy new year to you



posted on Mar, 29 2006 @ 08:00 AM
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Many years ago I worked with a Dr. from Iran --- actually she insisted on calling it Persia. This was perhaps 30yrs ago now. She was outraged at what was happeing in her country. Several years later I met another person who was also from Iran. He, too, was outraged at what happened to the country after the revolution. Both these individuals and their families were well educated, established families.

Undoubtedly there are many, many others whose 'take' on the changes in Iran that lead to the current situation are similar. IMHO, the only viable way for things to change are for the people of Iran to want and work toward change. A government built on religious extremism or exclusion is bound to fail. History proves that.



posted on Mar, 29 2006 @ 10:50 AM
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Originally posted by Mehran
why is it it had to be iraq and not us?.

Well, ok, if you insist, we'll see ya in about a year, lets pencil it in ok?


Joking aside, I don't think that anyone is anxious to really see a Shah on the throne in Iran anytime soon.


but how is democracy going to restored to iran with an air strike and not a full scale invasion?.

Thats why its going to be a full invasion.

Short of the iranians actually doing something on their own.
I mean, if the islamic radicals were able to overthrow the shah, then the student democratic radicals should be able to overthrow the revolutionary guard and the rest, no? But they don't seem too intersted in it.



posted on Mar, 29 2006 @ 11:12 AM
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I love the talk of "bringing democracy to Iran", considering Iran is the only functioning democracy in the Middle East excluding Israel. It's certainly a limited democracy (the Mullah's can disqualify candidates at will, and do), however it's far more democratic than most of our allies in the region.

As for the Shah, he was a brutal dictator that was installed by the US. Rebellion against his tyranny led directly to the theocracy that rules Iran today.

Iran was a fully functional democracy until 1953, when the US and UK engineered the overthrow of Dr. Mohammed Mossadegh, who nationalized Iran's petroleum industry, threatening US and UK business's oil revenue.

So Iran, like Afghanistan and Iraq, is another example of Cold War misdeeds coming back to haunt us. If we hadn't put the Shah in power (before 1953 he was mostly a figurehead) the Mullah's might never have come to power. Iran might be a moderate, democratic country now if we hadn't interfered in the first place...



posted on Mar, 29 2006 @ 01:06 PM
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Democracy requires two conditions to happen in any country looking to change the government.

First, most of the population must want democracy.

Second, the security forces must be willing to stand down in the face of mass demonstrations.

Option #1 may or may not apply to Iran, I don't know.

Option #2 would not happen, the powers that be deploy brutal tactics to retain power, and will continue to operate that way. The Iranian population is not willing to stand up to the Revolutionary Guard and other security organizations, so Democracy won't happen.



posted on Mar, 29 2006 @ 02:12 PM
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Originally posted by Riwka
Mehran

Some days ago I read that Akbar Ganji, one of Iran's most famous dissidents, was released from jail.


Do you think people like Ganji - and others, like the brave students in Tehran can move anything?

And BTW: Happy new year to you


yes Riwka he was released and boy was he in horrible shape, we need more reformers and less people like our monkey brained president. By the way thanks for the comment for our new year, it was also celebrated in Israel itself.











[edit on 29-3-2006 by Mehran]



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