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What Will Be The Hot-Button Issue for the Mid-Term Elections?

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posted on Mar, 27 2006 @ 04:31 AM
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I was wondering what you folks think might be the issue of the November 2006 elections? I have heard many answers from friends and family, ranging from "war" to "the economy". But, I wanted to turn the question over to you. What do you guys think?




posted on Mar, 27 2006 @ 12:09 PM
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Howdy, again.

Immigration, hopefully. Or rather, curtailling illegal immigration. Our border security must be addressed, and soon...if it isn't already too late.

As always, Social Security will be a big buggaboo (love that word). It's not called the "third rail of American politics" without reason. Touch it and die.

The Iraq war, dealing with Iran and North Korea. Issues of foreign policy in Africa should be addressed, but will probably be ignored as unimportant. And China, mustn't forget about China.

I am sure that there are many others. Economics, of course, will be somewhat central
.



posted on Mar, 28 2006 @ 12:23 AM
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Hello.
It's nice to see your post here!

I'd agree that the war in Iraq is going to be important. But also, I would think it would be economics. Someone, I bet you, is going to ask, "How better off now than you were before 2000?"

And I also think that governmental corruption will also be in there. It won't be as prominent, but somehow, someway this idea will be worked in.



posted on Mar, 28 2006 @ 05:40 AM
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Well I am better off now than I was in 2000. Sorry, I just couldn't resist
. I think the politician who raises the spector of corruption had really better be not just clean, but sqeaky clean.

The economy is always an issue, not matter what shape its in. In my own life I happen to think the economy is serving me well. Homeownership and all that. For others it seems it isn't serving so well. So it will indeed be a hotbutton issue, it always is.

On Diebold, its my understanding that the technology is still relatively new, there will be bugs in any new tech. I am not saying there wasn't funny business going on in some form. There's always some group, or groups, that will do anything to win, and before anyone starts blaming the Republicans for all, just remember the Democrats are just as dirty, and have just as long a history of dirty tricks. Niether one are saints.

I still think that the foriegn policy debate will be the primary focus, both for and against the continuing war in Iraq, followed by the economy and border security.

[edit on 28-3-2006 by seagull]



posted on Mar, 28 2006 @ 09:29 AM
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I feel that the hot button issues for this mid term elections will deal with older Americans; health care, drugs, social security, etc, because old folks VOTE.

However this year might be an exception to the usual voting demographics because of the war, immigration issues and the outsourcing of jobs overseas.



posted on Mar, 29 2006 @ 02:41 AM
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whaaa and seagull,

I think you are both right when it comes to the important issues of the up-coming election. When it comes to understanding the new programs under Medicare, a lot of seniors find it unintelligible. But, imho, health care is probably a matter for more than older people. There are young people starting out in the work world without any type of benefits. And with businesses cutting benefits to save money, I think that Americans are in deep trouble if they can't pay the hospital bills after a devestating illness. It's frightening to think that it will take one of those to bankrupt you.

And I also think that the war will be important, because you can start seeing the "dissent" coming from different sides of the Iraq debate. The problem is finding out how deeply entrenched is the U.S. in the social and political unrest in the Middle East. Some segments of the population are upset because they think that young people are being sent overseas to die. And there are no good answers to assuage their grief. And then, the other side exists which supports America's efforts in Iraq (and maybe Iran). Don't be surprised if you hear, "America-- love it or leave it", once again.

Immigration is just as important because this is another issue that has to deal with a lukewarm economy as well as national security. I feel that no matter where you sit on these issues, the subject matter alone will divide the country in ways that GWB never envisioned in his entire life. Add to the anger about outsourcing and stir. What you get is a workforce troubled with strife on all socio-economic levels. And as I think about it more and more, there isn't a fair way that justifies all sides in the issue.

Especially about the corruption: Of course, both parties have their shenanigans. I'm not saying that one side is holier than thou opposed to the other. I'm just saying that this is a topic that will be constantly mentioned--especially when battling for the voter's soul in this up-coming election.



posted on Mar, 29 2006 @ 04:32 AM
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If the republicans have their way, people that speak spanish, people that enjoy anal sex and people that would prefer to terminate their unwanted prenancies.

If the democrats have their way, the $8.3 trillion US debt, border security, oil prices/alternative energy, civil rights, poverty, healthcare, tax reform, education, veterans and ethics.

And whoever brings up Iraq first loses.

GO!

[edit on 29-3-2006 by RANT]



posted on Mar, 30 2006 @ 12:57 AM
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That makes me wonder whether the mid-term elections is solely going to be decided upon the issues or whether it will be a referendum on GWB himself.

[edit on 30-3-2006 by ceci2006]



posted on Mar, 30 2006 @ 06:00 AM
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Originally posted by RANT
If the democrats have their way, the $8.3 trillion US debt, border security, oil prices/alternative energy, civil rights, poverty, healthcare, tax reform, education, veterans and ethics.

That will be a welcome change from the constant torrent of anti-Bush rhetoric they've been upchucking for the past six years.


If the republicans have their way, people that speak spanish, people that enjoy anal sex and people that would prefer to terminate their unwanted prenancies.

Thanks for the reminder of how shallow and evil one-half of our population is.


Imo, the voting public, apart from the die-hard base on both sides, would like nothing better than to do a complete housecleaning of all the deadbeats currently in office.



posted on Mar, 30 2006 @ 05:43 PM
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Originally posted by jsobecky
Imo, the voting public, apart from the die-hard base on both sides, would like nothing better than to do a complete housecleaning of all the deadbeats currently in office.


I'll get the flamethrowher if you get the vaccum cleaner!


Anyway, I know I am one of these, a person (a voting person) that wants to see everyone kicked out of office...

Maybe we should see if we can't get that amended to the Constitution or something, like every 25 years, everyone gets kicked out and a new Congress gets sworn in (it would be a problem for one of the two, can't remember which, the chamber that really never adjouns, and just re-adopts the rules every year).

But Corrupto poli-chickens would never let the people have real power, so I'm thinking that whatever we think, it's going to be the same carp, different person.


[edit on 30-3-2006 by Sir Solomon]



posted on Mar, 30 2006 @ 11:14 PM
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Then, what I take from you guys (jsobecky and Sir Solomon), that you would prefer the mid-term elections to be a housecleaning of all the incumbents and the placing of new faces within Congress.

That's fair--knowing that the doings of Congress is not high on my list as well.

But, would that mean that the issues surrounding the upcoming election aren't as important as a statement that people don't agree with what their representatives are doing?



posted on Mar, 30 2006 @ 11:26 PM
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Originally posted by ceci2006
But, would that mean that the issues surrounding the upcoming election aren't as important as a statement that people don't agree with what their representatives are doing?


The issues aren't as important as the cancer that has infected our government in the form of rampant corruption.

You don't worry about the broken bone as much as you would the lung cancer that could kill you. It's called triage, you treat what you can when you can. Right now, the corrupt parties have taken the scalpel of power (sorry for all the bad puns, I'm tired) away from the people, disallowing them from focusing on what's hurting them more than terrorism or energy prices or any of the other issues that will come up in the elections.

At least that's what I think of on this.



posted on Mar, 31 2006 @ 12:33 AM
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For me as well, corruption is a part of it. Because it bothers me that the government is out of touch with regular people. Our needs are not being heard.

However, I am more of a policy person. I think that voting on issues allows the politicians to understand what they are overlooking, whether or not they care.

Although in the past, I have voted for candidates as a referendum on the incumbent. In one such case, I thought the politician in office was doing such a horrible job for his constituency that it really made me angry. So, I examined the other candidates and their records. I watched the debates on T.V. and I read my voter's guide. And I chose another candidate. The incumbent lost in that case.

November 2006 offers that same unique opportunity to reexamine what our politicians do for us. So, voting in someone else might prove to be a form of protest against the ways of Washington.

However, the mid-term elections, by virtue of the Propositions, offer issues to be voted upon as well. We can't completely ignore public policy. Voting on issues that benefit yourself and other citizens can also prove to be a referendum on the candidate. Look what happened to Governor Schwartzenegger last year when he put eight referendums on the ballot that he thought could pass. It was a special election. Last November, no one in California voted for them. He was definitely rendered persona non grata. And he is still trying to pander to Californians through a series of ads he released this week.

I believe issues can be a wayto put politicians in their place if worked right.




[edit on 31-3-2006 by ceci2006]



posted on Mar, 31 2006 @ 06:02 AM
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I agree with you ceci, that the issues are the most important thing in any election. But the problem is, those idiots in office right now aren't talking issues - they're too busy mudslinging.

Send them and future congress-critters a message - if you don't take care of business, you're outta here!



posted on Mar, 31 2006 @ 06:01 PM
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Originally quoted by jsobecky
But the problem is, those idiots in office right now aren't talking issues - they're too busy mudslinging.


Yes, that is the sad thing about this problem. I wonder if the elections will be a way to get them to stop. Or, would people have to camp out on the steps of Congress to protest their behavior these past years?



posted on Apr, 1 2006 @ 07:28 PM
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Maybe we should just threaten them all with censorship and/or impeachment, for dereliction of duty and placing the security and safety of the nation in jeopardy as a result of not addressing key issues, such as border security or rising healthcare costs.



posted on Apr, 2 2006 @ 04:04 AM
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I think the best thing to do is to make this year's mid-term elections a referendum not only on the issues that affect us, but also on the incumbents that do not do their job in Congress. I think that this year more than most, both are equally important.

This is a very important year because nearly all the seats are up in the House. And some seats in the Senate are in the elections too.

So, I think that with the dissatisfaction that the American feel with the state of things, everyone in Congress has a right to be scared.



posted on Apr, 2 2006 @ 12:59 PM
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Every election this subject comes up. America's voters are mad at the incumbents, and this is a referendum. I find it amusing that the majority of incumbents somehow find their way back.

Not that I disagree with the notion, Ceci, because I do indeed think that it should be a referendum on their conduct while in office. But as a hotbutton issue? Not in and of itself. Too many people like having their Representitive in the House leadership, or Senator So and So is the Senior senator out of all of them. Washington state had just such a situation back in the 70's with Warren Magnusun and Henry Jackson, Jackson was our junior senator and outranked almost all of the other senior senators. There was no way they were ever going to be unseated. That kind of congressional clout was adictive, even for the voters.



posted on Apr, 3 2006 @ 02:46 AM
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I see what you mean, seagull. But I think the outcry from the American people might be a little bit stronger now than in previous years. It's true that change is a hard concept to grasp when a constituency becomes used to an incumbent. But, strangely enough, Congress has demonstrated this time that it has not heard the will of the people especially on key issues. And with approval rating low for the POTUS, Vice-POTUS and the Congress, I would bet on some interesting results in November.

I'm sure you're right when you say that it won't be the issue. But, it will certainly be one of the issues that people think about as they go to the Ballot Box.



posted on Apr, 3 2006 @ 12:38 PM
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Truely I do hope you are right, and it will be at the back of my mind when I vote this fall. I just hope it's in the minds of a lot of voters this fall. I guess we'll just have to wait and see.

Calling them on the lack of responce to the stated will of the people is required, particularly on the illegal immigration issue. Here's hoping they listen...



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