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High voltage ion flight

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posted on Mar, 25 2006 @ 11:12 PM
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exactly. It would be sweet. But even to utilze the technology for a hover craft would be sweet. Being that there is no friction with the ground only thing that would limit you is the friction with air.




posted on Mar, 25 2006 @ 11:18 PM
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Originally posted by imbalanced
. But even to utilze the technology for a hover craft would be sweet. Being that there is no friction with the ground only thing that would limit you is the friction with air.


Oh man I didnt even think about that. Could this tech maybe make a Hover board ala Back to the Future 2 if it had enough power?

That would be so sweet



posted on Mar, 25 2006 @ 11:44 PM
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Originally posted by ShadowXIX

Originally posted by imbalanced
. But even to utilze the technology for a hover craft would be sweet. Being that there is no friction with the ground only thing that would limit you is the friction with air.


Oh man I didnt even think about that. Could this tech maybe make a Hover board ala Back to the Future 2 if it had enough power?

That would be so sweet


No. Sorry to disappoint, but as I said above, this thrust is proportional to the Air Gap of each electrode, and there is a sweet spot where one can go no higher without additional Nitrogen presant, I wouldn't experiment with that though heh. A small lifter device has 3 electrodes. Some designes call for 6, 2 on each(all with various airgaps in either mm or cm, I wonder what would happen on the micron scale or the angstrom scale
). The amount of power you pump into the system does not scale linearly. It's more like an Ion Engine then anything else. You turn it on and it produces thrust. I've not yet seen a model that effectively scales in propotion to the energy input. If you can find some details on this I'll be grateful. Have been out of touch with this scene for a couple of years now.

Also it's been proven to work sealed. Some guy dipped his in a vat of Teflon to make it waterproof, it worked and had the added effect of getting rid of that annoying buzzing sound.

[edit on 25-3-2006 by sardion2000]

[edit on 25-3-2006 by sardion2000]



posted on Mar, 25 2006 @ 11:49 PM
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darn looks like hover boards remain lumped in with Light sabers in the fat chance department



posted on Mar, 25 2006 @ 11:51 PM
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Thats a big show stopper. I will try to find more details on this and report findings.

What about from a pulsed source, to keep it at a certain altitude. Say 1 foot ?
That would be more efficient and also give benefit of not being attached to the ground.

you say its not linear, meaning that if you increase power it wont increase in production of lift, or having larger surfaces of electrodes it will not produce more lift, or...both ?

Micron scale....
I think it would not produce enough lift to be uselful being that the ions are only moving a very small distance and not colliding with other molecules to invite more friends to come and play. But... only a test will put the questions to rest

[edit on 25-3-2006 by imbalanced]



posted on Mar, 25 2006 @ 11:54 PM
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Originally posted by ShadowXIX
darn looks like hover boards remain lumped in with Light sabers in the fat chance department


We'll see. I was only talking about the here and now. Different materials could be used as the conductor and supports. The airgap problem may become obsolete because a more solid state electrode was created using Nanotechnology or some such. Even though this stuff has been around a long time, it still needs quite a lot of time to develop for commercial applications, barring a huge, unprecedented release of hypothetical classified information regarding anything related tot his technology that is.




you say its not linear, meaning that if you increase power it wont increase in production of lift, or having larger surfaces of electrodes it will not produce more lift, or...both ?


The thrust from each individual electrode air gap doesn't scale. You need to effectively increase overall surface area.



The best jlnlabs has done is 31 % of it's total weight. It's a start.

jlnlabs.imars.com...

[edit on 26-3-2006 by sardion2000]



posted on Mar, 26 2006 @ 12:02 AM
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as you increase the amount of material to make more electrodes, the overall weight increases........until it becomes so heavy that t cant do anything but sit there and make like a dead bee.

well, the only thing i need right now is a kv power supply and some more foil


[edit on 26-3-2006 by imbalanced]

[edit on 26-3-2006 by imbalanced]



posted on Mar, 26 2006 @ 03:11 AM
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LoL so sorry about the misquote on price... Jeez you people can be a bit combattive here and there... ever hear of the slip of an extra zero button tapped?

Either way though... I've played with townsend brown and lifter style stuff and while similar they are not the same and both have their own bugaboos. Both are seriously entertaining though and with enough effort and the fruits of current materials science who knows where they'll go.



posted on Mar, 26 2006 @ 07:07 AM
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Sugarlump, I've never played around with the Biefield-Brown effect. Do you know of any way to easily do it at home?
I was thinking about a circular piece of styrofoam insulation with tinfoil on the top and bottom to make a huge capacitor.

I think I'll do a little googling on this one.

I didn't mean to make you feel bad in my post, just wanted to relate my experiences. I've always been one to do things as inexpensively as possible.



posted on Oct, 29 2007 @ 07:00 AM
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Has anyone experimented with a non triangular design? Perhaps an array of rings, dishes, or cylinders? Has there been any experimentation with control surfaces or an adjustable air gap?



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