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why join secret societies?

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posted on Mar, 19 2006 @ 04:29 AM
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why join if it's not like eyes wide shut?

[edit on 19-3-2006 by akseventy4]




posted on Mar, 19 2006 @ 07:38 PM
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Some people get off way more on Power than some gnostic sex magick.

I for one believe that being a part of it would be exciting, and give some people's lives more meaning, and the feeling that because they are in on it, they are special and better people than the average joe.

Masons refer to non Masons as "the profane." Insulting no?

I think however, that a lot of people join because they are good people and wish to do something more with their lives, ie, betterment of themselves and their communities. Masonry has been a constant on my fathers side of the family, and to be honest, I would probably join it if they invited me, but in the meantime, its not bothering me that I don't, if I needed to be a part of a secret society I would.

Joining some is easier than most people believe, and I'm not referring to Masonry in this case.

To be one, ask one.



posted on Mar, 19 2006 @ 07:56 PM
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Originally posted by DrBones666
Masons refer to non Masons as "the profane." Insulting no?


No.

In a Masonic context "profane" simply means, "outside of the temple".

Like the words "terrific" and "wicked", it has mutated to imply something else in today's world.



posted on Mar, 19 2006 @ 09:10 PM
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Mild Profanity


Originally posted by DrBones666
Masons refer to non Masons as "the profane." Insulting no?

Actually, no.


As Roark pointed out, the word "profane" is not necessarily derogatory.

It is derived from the Latin word "profanus" which means literally "in front of the temple".

Note sense 3 in the Dictionary.com definition:


3. Not admitted into a body of secret knowledge or ritual; uninitiated.

Masonic rituals and jargon are ancient and traditional in nature, and thus contain many terms whose common meanings have changed over the years.

That doesn't mean they hate you.



posted on Mar, 20 2006 @ 12:14 AM
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And I never said that they did....



posted on Mar, 20 2006 @ 12:37 AM
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Secret societies are said to do some pretty shady wicked things. I might be tempted to join just to see what they do. But I'm a girl so that would be impossile; they don't let females in.



posted on Mar, 20 2006 @ 01:46 AM
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If they have nothing to hide why are they so secretive?



posted on Mar, 20 2006 @ 02:19 AM
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No Insult Intended


Originally posted by DrBones666
And I never said that they did....

Sorry, you're right.

How about: "That doesn't mean they're insulting you."


Right To Privacy


Originally posted by Stunkums
If they have nothing to hide why are they so secretive?

A fair question.

Keeping something secret doesn't necessarily mean it's something sinister.

My conversations with my family members contain nothing scandalous or evil, but that doesn't mean I'm going to post transcripts online, or that I'm comfortable with people listening in on my private phone calls.

By the same token, I have nothing shocking or unusual in my bedroom closet, but that doesn't mean I want strangers rummaging around in there.

As it turns out, though, if you want to go see what Masons are up to, all you have to do is ask.

While that may not mean letting you go through all the file cabinets in the front office or plant listening devices in the meeting hall, none of the Masons I've known have impressed me as being all that sneaky or suspicious.





[edit on 3/20/2006 by Majic]



posted on Mar, 20 2006 @ 08:55 AM
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Originally posted by ProudCanadian
Secret societies are said to do some pretty shady wicked things. I might be tempted to join just to see what they do. But I'm a girl so that would be impossile; they don't let females in.


Actually, a great number of so-called secret societies admit women. If you are referring to Freemasonry, it does not because of it's nature as a fraternity, but there are other secret societies, such as sororities, who admit only women.

Then there's some that admit both, like O.T.O. and Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn.



posted on Mar, 21 2006 @ 07:08 AM
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Masonic Light, I find your posts interesting and informative as always, I would like to know what you have to say about the O.T.O, as I am intrigued by the laws and principles of Thelema, as well as its practitioners. I have read a previous thread, but what is your general opinion about it, and in the other thread, you never actually said what those crazy parties are all about....



posted on Mar, 21 2006 @ 08:44 AM
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Originally posted by DrBones666
Masonic Light, I find your posts interesting and informative as always, I would like to know what you have to say about the O.T.O, as I am intrigued by the laws and principles of Thelema, as well as its practitioners. I have read a previous thread, but what is your general opinion about it, and in the other thread, you never actually said what those crazy parties are all about....



I have mixed feelings about Thelema. In its most general doctrinal form, it isn't much different than other occult currents, at least if it's properly understood. Although Thelema makes much of the New Aeon formula, it is actually sort of superficial, at least in regards to the individual practitioner. I believe that if one commits himself to Thelema, he may obtaing Adeptship.

As for Crowley, I also have mixed feelings. There can be no doubt that he was an expert on the subject, and was very dedicated to his practice. On the other hand, there is no doubt that he often failed to live up to the standards of an Adept. Of course, nobody's perfect, but we should at least try to be, lol.

Nevertheless, I do recommend Crowley to more advanced students of occultism, but warn beginners to be careful with him. This is simply because I assume that someone who has already studied the golden System in depth will be in a better position of separating Crowley's wheat from his chaff, than would a neophyte.

Concerning the O.T.O., again, mixed feelings. It cannot be doubted that there are sincere aspirants within its ranks, but I also feel the system has been abused by others (of course, the same thing could be said about Masonry). I don't necessarily recommend that folks actually avoid the O.T.O., but I do recommend they give everything careful thought. Many former members of the O.T.O. complain about their leaders, and their complaints probably aren't always unfounded.

Concerning the parties, I was just funning around. Thelema generally attracts the "party types". For example, Crowley became popular in the USA with the beatniks in the 1950's and the hippies in the 1960's (my own first exposure to Crowley was seeing his portrait on the cover of the Beatles' "Sgt. Peppers" album).


Cug

posted on Mar, 21 2006 @ 02:26 PM
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Originally posted by Masonic Light
Many former members of the O.T.O. complain about their leaders, and their complaints probably aren't always unfounded.


I tend to not give *that* much weight to former members, and many obviously have an axe to grind (but not all of them do) and you only hear one side of the story.

But there is still plenty of complaints coming from current members. For example pretty much every interview with Keith418 on the Thelema coast to coast podcast



posted on Mar, 24 2006 @ 11:31 PM
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show me the way of Kali Yuga.



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