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UK and US Intelligence Blamed For Attack In Iran - At Least 22 Civilians Killed

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posted on Mar, 18 2006 @ 01:57 AM
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At least 22 people were killed in an attack near Iran's border with Afghanistan. Many of those killed were government employees. An Iranian General say he has information that US and UK intelligence services instructed "local bandits" to carry out the attack. After the attack the gunmen fled across the border to Afghanistan.


BBC: Twenty-two killed at Iran border

17 March 2006




At least 22 people have been killed by gunmen near Iran's border with Afghanistan, official reports say. Many of those killed were government employees and the governor of the provincial capital, Zahedan, was seriously injured in the attack. Police Commander Gen Esmail Ahmadi- Moqaddam said the gunmen posed as police and closed the Zabol to Zahedan road in Sistan-Baluchistan Province. Gen Ahmadi-Moqaddam said US and British intelligence were behind the attack.

After killing the civilians the attacks had fled across the border to Afghanistan, he added. Gen Ahmadi-Moqaddam said he had information indicating that US and UK intelligence services had held meetings with the gunmen. "The said intelligence services had instructed the local bandits on ways of undermining security in the region," he said. "It seems that they are pursuing the same policy that they did in the Iraqi town of Samarra, that is, to provoke fighting between Shias and Sunnis."

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.

Actually the General´s claim doesn´t sound so crazy. He might be right about this. I know just what is said here in this article. Any thoughts? Are UK and US intelligence trying to stir up some trouble in Iran?




posted on Mar, 18 2006 @ 02:06 AM
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It's very possible.

Iran could also benefit from staging an attack to cement public opinion against the Americans.

Bottom line, in my mind though, is that it doesn't matter what actually happened. What matters is that both sides will come to the same predictable conclusions in the absence of hard evidence, and the rift between them will grow.



posted on Mar, 18 2006 @ 02:07 AM
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Looks like Iran may not wait to start a war with the US lol...



posted on Mar, 18 2006 @ 02:19 AM
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Are UK and US intelligence trying to stir up some trouble in Iran?



It would be disappointing if they weren't. Just as Iran is responsible for sending IED's and undercover soldiers into Iraq to slow our efforts and make things tough for our guys, you know that we are doing things to make life hell for the Iranian government. Our special forces are across the Afghani borders and in Iran itself spreading disinformation, gathering intel and recruiting and training small guerilla teams. Mostly outsiders, probably Afghani or even Pakistani wanting to make money. It's all part of the game. What better way to get away with striking a civilian target or a hi risk area than to farm it out to locals. If anyone gets caught by the Iranians during the attacks American officials could deny involvement because they were not American soldiers. No worry of losing face in the political world and no risk of getting burned in the press. Sort of like hiring thugs to do your dirty work for you, paying mercenaries that do not have to operate under the rules of combat (ie killing civilians.)



posted on Mar, 18 2006 @ 03:02 AM
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Questionable Motives


Originally posted by Hellmutt
Any thoughts? Are UK and US intelligence trying to stir up some trouble in Iran?

I would be surprised if the US/UK weren't conducting all sorts of special ops in Iran, but this sort of thing doesn't seem like the kind of operation they would be interested in.

How does something like this benefit the US/UK?


At the very least, it suggests there is lawlessness in Afghanistan and provides propaganda fodder for Iran. If it's true, then it gives opponents of the US/UK grounds for accusing these countries of sponsoring terrorism.

That doesn't seem like a very desirable outcome.


Of course, I don't know. Maybe there's more to the story than meets the eye. It wouldn't be the first time.

But without a reasonably clear motive, I find it hard to take the claim that US/UK intelligence was behind this attack at face value.

More likely, an Afghani warlord decided to extend his influence (perhaps as part of a smuggling operation), and probably cares little about national boundaries.

More details about who actually carried out the attack would be helpful, and I wouldn't be at all surprised in Nato forces actually staged a raid on the warlord's stronghold to keep him from causing further international incidents.

Then again, I could be wrong.

We'll see, I suppose, unless this falls down the media memory hole like so much else.



posted on Mar, 18 2006 @ 03:30 AM
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Well, despite my alarmist disposition, after reviewing another reuters story on this, IMO this is not related to the new "propaganda campaign to isolate Iran" that is recently in question on ATS.

To me it just sounds like another typical action from a group that has been known to do so before. Or at least that's the way these articles appear to paint it.

But not surprisingly, in retribution for all the US accusations of Iranian meddling in Iraq, Iran has attempted to place the blame on the US/UK for this incident.
As with any other accusations, hey: show us the goods Iran. What you got that shows that the US/UK was involved?

Also it said in the article that the militants captured hostages and demanded Iranian release of prisoners... So, could this be related?

Iran's most prominent dissident journalist Akbar Ganji has been freed from jail after six years.

[edit on 18-3-2006 by TrueAmerican]



posted on Mar, 18 2006 @ 05:32 AM
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Originally posted by TrueAmerican

another reuters story on this

Hmmm... 22 civilians or 22 soldiers?... A Sunni group said they did it?

A Sunni rebel group said on Friday it was behind an attack that killed 22 people [...] , Al Arabiya television said
[...]
An official in the city of Zahedan earlier said: "Armed bandits attacked ordinary people on Thursday night. They killed 22."
[...]
Police Chief Esmaeel Ahmadi-Moqaddam told state television such attacks aimed to spark clashes between the predominant Shi'ite majority and Sunni Muslim minority. He accused British forces in Iraq of helping the bandits. "We have information that the bandits had meetings with British intelligence services," he said


For a good analysis of the Balochistan war, check out: FTS: Balochistan War Continues (by Soj)


Sep

posted on Mar, 18 2006 @ 09:06 AM
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Originally posted by TrueAmerican
Also it said in the article that the militants captured hostages and demanded Iranian release of prisoners... So, could this be related?

Iran's most prominent dissident journalist Akbar Ganji has been freed from jail after six years.


The short answer is no. Akbar Ganji (former military man with war credentials anyone would be proud of) is a respected Shia, author who seeks democratic reforms in Iran who has nothing to do with the Baluchi militants and drug-dealers of the west of Iran.

I’d recommend his books but I don’t think they have been translated to English yet.


Sep

posted on Mar, 18 2006 @ 09:13 AM
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Originally posted by BlackOps719
It would be disappointing if they weren't. Just as Iran is responsible for sending IED's and undercover soldiers into Iraq to slow our efforts and make things tough for our guys, you know that we are doing things to make life hell for the Iranian government.



Reuters

The top U.S. military officer said on Tuesday the United States does not have proof that Iran's government is responsible for Iranians smuggling
weapons and military personnel into Iraq.

Asked whether the United States has proof that Iran's government was behind these developments, Marine Corps Gen. Peter Pace, chairman of the military's Joint Chiefs of Staff, told a Pentagon briefing, "I do not, sir."



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