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altitude , its effects on artillery range

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posted on Mar, 17 2006 @ 09:49 AM
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a strange question , but what range benefit would howitzers gain for being sited 1200 to 2300 feet above the target ?

please note - i am not looking for info on the effects of hi altitude [ reduced air drag etc ] - i have found some info on this in the reports of the indo pakistan conflicts , but infuriatingly - they dont mention what range extensions they get firing at targets below them


my exact situation is :

i want to site guns - on ridge lines - at upto 2300 feet altitude - to extend thier range - against targets @ sea level and every metre i can squeeze out of them wil be crucial

PS - before people get worried - this is for a wargame - i am not planning a real life war - lol




posted on Mar, 19 2006 @ 06:19 AM
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Interesting, I'm not sure what the difference would be at 2300m. However I did read a book called " War at the top of the World ", which dealt witht eh Indian/Paki confrontation at the Siachen glacier at 7100m. They said they could get a few extra km's out of their pieces.



posted on Mar, 19 2006 @ 07:35 AM
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could you give me the muzzle velocity, projectile weight and firing anlge? should be easy math to determinate the range from those (finding opimal angle might be the problem)


bj

posted on Mar, 27 2006 @ 08:09 PM
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You'll gain some range. Think about the standard parabolic trajectory the the round describes as it flies. If you allow the curve to continue below the x-axis (if you were plotting a graph), as y continued to go negative, x would still be spreading slowly to the right.

Firing tables for artillery have ways to take this into account, both the height difference between the gun and target, as well as lower air drag at higher elevations



posted on Mar, 27 2006 @ 08:17 PM
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I thought 45 degrees was the optimum throwing or lobbing angle for anything.


bj

posted on Apr, 1 2006 @ 11:04 AM
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that's true. Generally the longest range will be around 45 degrees. Usually a bit off to account for things like drag and any lift that may be induced by the projectile.



posted on Apr, 1 2006 @ 02:50 PM
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Problem is that while 45-55° may be the best, the angle at which the shell arrives on target is often 10-15° more than the launch angle. So 45° launch means about 60° -70° arrival angle. Thats one of the advantages of howitzers and mortars over guns, they can reach overobsticals in a way guns can't ...also the blast pattern is best if the shell arrives as close to the vertical as possible.



posted on Apr, 3 2006 @ 09:22 PM
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Even going with a no drag projectile, (yeah, pure thoery), any hieght advantage gives you a nearly 1:1 increase in range. from level ground, part of that projectile's energy will be spent climbing through the first 2,500 meters. (heck, meters, feet, inches...) Again, that no drag projectile will be descending at the same angle as it passes through the same horozontal plane, meaning it's back up to a 45 degree decent. The real advantage comes in protection from enemy artillery, as they have to move much closer to shoot you, giving you adaquate time to squeeze a few shells off first.

In reality, your outbound projectile will loose forward momentum, and always arrive at a bit steeper of an angle than it departed at, making less than 45 degrees a better firing angle for maximum range. (use your energy going downrange, instead of up and down) Now your hieght advantage should really tell, as you're able to fire at shallower angels to hit your targets.



posted on Apr, 4 2006 @ 03:07 AM
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Forget the math for a moment, and I know this is only for a wargame, but in what role are you going to use your artillery?

Anti-armour, anti-personnel or as an area defence weapon? It does make a difference, especially if you are taking the math all that seriously.



posted on Apr, 4 2006 @ 08:22 PM
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Easy it would have a substantially increased range and a MUCH higher kinetic energy upon impact with the target tough I do not know the terminal velocity of a shell that size but I suspect it is less then the velocity that is used today. Its accuracy would go to hell in a hand basket though



posted on Apr, 5 2006 @ 08:23 AM
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the only effect on accuracy will be the result of increasing your range. and if you're using guided or semi-guided munitions, then range doesn't matter for accuracy.



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