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Africa is Splitting Apart

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posted on Mar, 15 2006 @ 12:14 PM
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This story made me do a double take on what the heck is going on.
 




Normally new rivers, seas and mountains are born in slow motion. The Afar Triangle near the Horn of Africa is another story. A new ocean is forming there with staggering speed -- at least by geological standards. Africa will eventually lose its horn.



Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


What do you guys and gals think of this happening in our time?

Related News Links:
service.spiegel.de




posted on Mar, 15 2006 @ 01:19 PM
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All I can say is, its gonna cost a fortune to go on holiday in the future, u've all seen the way the world has evolved right, I find it amazing & think the world will just end up as small islands splattered around the globe



posted on Mar, 15 2006 @ 01:24 PM
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The continents will split up, recombine, split up, recombine and split up again. That's just the way it goes. It's interesting how the world works.



posted on Mar, 15 2006 @ 01:44 PM
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Wow, everything is falling apart.

I'll be darned.



posted on Mar, 15 2006 @ 02:09 PM
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I hope everyone realizes that it will take millions of years for the rift to split open enough to form a new sea. At this point in my life I have no plans to wait around for this to happen.

Places like Vancouver Island are also on the move, but it's only traveling an inch or two a year.
(that's why the B.C. Ferries keep jacking up ticket prices) :shk:

It's a dynamic world we live on, but geology is very slow compared to our brief lifespans.....



posted on Mar, 15 2006 @ 02:19 PM
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guys and gals think of this happening in our time?

This is not something that is happening 'fast' in anything near the human scale. Its a normal geological rifting process that started millions of years ago and would take millions more years to complete. The African rift, the red sea, and the major faults that travel through the levant and into the turkish and armenia mountain ranges, are all part of this rifting. The arabian peninsula, for example, in the distant past was connected to africa, without any red sea.

I find it amazing & think the world will just end up as small islands splattered around the globe

The continents rip apart, and are smashed back together. Infact, there have been a few periods in the past where there was only one gigantic continent on the face of the earth, broke apart, all came back together, broke apart again, and formed todays continents.


The earth beneath your feet is in a constant state of very slow flux. The crust of the earth is a thin veneer of cold material, and man has never even drilled through it. The mantle underneath the crust is rock under such powerful conditions that it behaves as a plastic, and roils around like convection cells in a pot of stew.



posted on Mar, 15 2006 @ 02:33 PM
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Originally posted by texmiller
What do you guys and gals think of this happening in our time?





External Source
Geophysicists have calculated that in 10 million years the East African Rift System will be as large as the Red Sea. When that happens, Africa will lose its horn.


I'm thinking...........no.



posted on Mar, 15 2006 @ 09:01 PM
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Originally posted by anxietydisorder
I hope everyone realizes that it will take millions of years for the rift to split open enough to form a new sea. At this point in my life I have no plans to wait around for this to happen.

Places like Vancouver Island are also on the move, but it's only traveling an inch or two a year.
(that's why the B.C. Ferries keep jacking up ticket prices) :shk:

It's a dynamic world we live on, but geology is very slow compared to our brief lifespans.....


The SE Asian undersea quake changed the facts we had so far, and showed that rapid geographical change is not only possible, but it does happen. Geographical changes do not always take millions or thousands of years. If the SE Asian disaster is to teach humankind something, the least it taught us is that things can change in the lifetime of one man.


[edit on 15-3-2006 by Muaddib]



posted on Mar, 15 2006 @ 09:14 PM
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I agree with the above poster, things could possibly happen in our lifetime but they can also span the course of centuries. Nature is unpredictable and humans should assume they know everything there is to know.




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