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Tornadoes and fires aye yae yae...

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posted on Mar, 14 2006 @ 12:08 AM
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Originally posted by Hellmutt
Oh, that is so sad. This picture I will remember for quite some time I believe. An incredibly sad picture. The dog.... still chained up...


Yes, appart from feeling the hurt that these people have just gone through, and feeling sad for the deaths, the injured and the torment that so many people, children more so than adults, have gone through, I also felt bad for that dog. The way he/she is laying is clearly asking the person who took the picture to help him out of that chain and to comfort him.




posted on Mar, 14 2006 @ 12:09 AM
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"...and with progressively higher thresholds used to define actual tornado outbreaks.

Right. You do that.

Local outbreaks don't count friend.
Do you realize that if 10 were an approximaty that there would be a tornado outbreak every week in the central US March through September?


10 is used as an approximaty to be used for a reference. The scale of the outbreak is divided in this rate:

Normal
Minor
Moderate
Significant
Severe

Considering 39 was the max total of on ground tolls, this ranks as a normal event. Minor would be at least 50, Moderate 70, Significant 90, Severe 100 or more.

On ground reports were not high enough to warrant any of these. The news stations report what NOAA's reports say, they do NOT review what has actually hit the ground or what is a double report.



posted on Mar, 14 2006 @ 12:16 AM
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I'm done with this thread, as I am confident if this were a debate, I would have won.

Thanks for your time.


Next.



posted on Mar, 14 2006 @ 12:18 AM
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Originally posted by WyrdeOne


No, I don't think the dog is dead dude. It's laying on its back and looks completely uninjured. If it was tied to a chain in 70mph winds its head and body would no longer be in the same area code.


I didn't say anything about the dog being dead, and the dog could have found shelter which a human couldn't, even being chained, he could have opened a hole which we can't see, the area seen in the picture does not show everywhere where that dog could have gone to.



Originally posted by WyrdeOne
Why don't these people build their houses out of concrete? The cost is not exhorbitant, and it would save the country billions. Everyone living near tornadoes, hurricanes, heavy snows, and windy areas should build with that in mind.

Some of these people were living in wooden boxes on top of cinderblocks. :shk:

And they act surprised when their house blows over.


Build a concrete dome and laugh at momma nature!


You mean like this concrete building?




Photo: The back wall of the Carter-Waters Distribution Center in Kansas City, Mo., was blown in by storms moving through the area. (AP)



[edit on 14-3-2006 by Muaddib]



posted on Mar, 14 2006 @ 12:19 AM
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Back to the subject matter here, I'll post the 2 PM storm report, that should have the summary and correct numbers of Sundays outbreaks. Those 7/100 numbers still seem wrong to me.



posted on Mar, 14 2006 @ 12:19 AM
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Anyone who denies that we are and have been experiencing unprecedented events throughout the world in regards to weather and natural disaster is living in a fantasy land.

The amount and extent of natural disasters are being greatly under-reported.

Is it just chance? Is it global warming? Is it government weather control experiments, or could it be signs of the end times?


What do you think?



posted on Mar, 14 2006 @ 12:23 AM
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The times are not ending, and there will be no end times, except maybe for the Earth in about 100 million years.

There are changes which the Earth, and the entire solar system is going through and which will affect us all. We have to be prepared for what is coming, and it will get worse.



posted on Mar, 14 2006 @ 12:25 AM
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Actually someone said this earlier, but midwest weather with La Nina is actually receeding back to normal with this storm event that's occured. I feel this is more of a catchup/balance out event if I might explain.

In 2005 we hit a defecit of -25.96 inches of rain, putting us into a severe drought, it was not only the 2nd hottest summer, but the driest summer ever in our history at least since 1888. We had minimal severe weather across the region.

Then we had the 4th warmest and 2nd driest winter on record since 1888. The last normal period was 2003. I feel that nature is simply fixing herself from us screwing up. We had 3.57 inches of rain, putting us 4 inches over the normal rainfall amounts for March in our location, impacting the drought.

The statement that the midwest is shifting back to normal is true on a scientific scale. I would suggest you monitor SPC forecasts later in the year and take note of rainfall and weather events in the central US notating it back to normal, as that's visually what is going on.



posted on Mar, 14 2006 @ 12:32 AM
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Originally posted by Shugo

10 is used as an approximaty to be used for a reference. The scale of the outbreak is divided in this rate:

Normal
Minor
Moderate
Significant
Severe

Considering 39 was the max total of on ground tolls, this ranks as a normal event. Minor would be at least 50, Moderate 70, Significant 90, Severe 100 or more.

On ground reports were not high enough to warrant any of these. The news stations report what NOAA's reports say, they do NOT review what has actually hit the ground or what is a double report.


This is what is being reported Shugo.


The National Weather Service said there were as many as 110 reported instances of tornadoes touching down over the weekend in Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Illinois. But the weather service said it could take two weeks to confirm those accounts.


Excerpted form.
www.foxnews.com...


They did report 110 instances of tornadoes touching down over the weekend.

[edit on 14-3-2006 by Muaddib]



posted on Mar, 14 2006 @ 12:34 AM
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As I said, I'll have to wait for an updated report, I don't listen to news sources or online sources for weather scenarios anymore, I wait for NWS direct official reports. Also as I said, something seems wrong with those numbers, so hang tight.



posted on Mar, 14 2006 @ 12:35 AM
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Muaddib, not to nitpick, but a.) the dog could have been brought outside and chained after the storm passed, and b.) the picture you posted of the concrete building - was that a dome?

Nope.

The walls, you may have noticed, were just stacked cinderblocks with no reinforcement whatsoever. There was no rebar, no concrete filler, no rubble for stability.

News flash, a poorly built building fell down today.


This is what I'm talking about - www.monolithic.com...



posted on Mar, 14 2006 @ 12:42 AM
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Originally posted by Shugo
As I said, I'll have to wait for an updated report, I don't listen to news sources or online sources for weather scenarios anymore, I wait for NWS direct official reports. Also as I said, something seems wrong with those numbers, so hang tight.


I started searching for NOAAs weather report for the weekend and this is what I found. This is directly from NOAA.



It shows 113 tornadoes hitting the ground.

Excerpted from.
www.spc.noaa.gov...



posted on Mar, 14 2006 @ 12:45 AM
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Those are just preliminary reports muaddib, it says so on the graphic you posted.

Reports of tornadoes don't always equal actual tornadoes. Keep in mind that multiple reports can come in regarding a single tornado, and that reports can be in error.



posted on Mar, 14 2006 @ 12:47 AM
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Originally posted by WyrdeOne
............
News flash, a poorly built building fell down today.


This is what I'm talking about - www.monolithic.com...


Perhaps you dind't notice the cost of that. i don't know about you but I am not a millionare.



North Carolina Monolithic Dome--
Italy, Texas
Total Construction Costs
$1.8 Million


Excerpted from article you linked.

Tell me how many people can afford that building? I know I can't.



posted on Mar, 14 2006 @ 12:48 AM
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Muda, no, those are not on ground tornadoes. Those are reports either by officials or persons in the area. Those are what is being looked into and will be expurced later today.



posted on Mar, 14 2006 @ 12:52 AM
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The following is a forecast of severe weather for tomorrow.



Link can be found at.

www.spc.noaa.gov...

[edit on 14-3-2006 by Muaddib]



posted on Mar, 14 2006 @ 12:55 AM
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lol, I love how quiet the nation got after today. That is quite a feat. Most of the text reports result in no activity.
good news for people on the east coast.



posted on Mar, 14 2006 @ 12:56 AM
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Originally posted by Shugo
Muda, no, those are not on ground tornadoes. Those are reports either by officials or persons in the area. Those are what is being looked into and will be expurced later today.


Unless they change the report, which they might very well do. I'll go with the original report saying that there were 110 instances of tornadoes touching down. You could very well be right, but this is what we know for now.



posted on Mar, 14 2006 @ 12:59 AM
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Very much agreed!


We will know more when they have a week outlook release IMO.
Will have it up for everyone when it comes up!



posted on Mar, 14 2006 @ 01:05 AM
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Dude, look at the area it was built in, the architecture, and the floor space.

Domes are no more expensive per sq ft than normal homes, and in many cases are significantly cheaper. You can obviously rich them up a bit, depending on what sort of surfaces you install inside, what sort of creative outside architecture you employ, landscaping, and so on.

The only reason I can possibly think of NOT to live in one, is the aesthetic issue, but it aint worth dying over.

Here's a two bedroom dome in AZ for 85k. www.ajorealty.com...



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