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Early Severe Weather 2006 Outbreak to Impact Midwest

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posted on Mar, 11 2006 @ 10:55 AM
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NWS Offices across the central US are forecasting a moderate risk of severe thunderstorms over the next 48 hours across the midwest and into the southern plains. This has been tracked from March 1, 2006 in Norman, Oklahoma, and has brought the highest temperatures in 2006 so far to the Central Region into the mid to upper 60s and lower 70's as far north as Southern Wisconsin.

The Storm Prediction Center has released this statement relating to todays severe weather outbreak, effective for up to 24 hours from 0700 AM Central Standard Time:



...SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS EXPECTED OVER PARTS OF THE EASTERN SRN
PLAINS AND MISSISSIPPI VALLEY REGION LATER TODAY AND TONIGHT...

THE NWS STORM PREDICTION CENTER IN NORMAN OK IS FORECASTING THE
DEVELOPMENT OF TORNADOES...LARGE HAIL AND DAMAGING WINDS OVER PARTS
OF THE MIDDLE MISSISSIPPI VALLEY REGION LATER TODAY AND TONIGHT.

THE AREAS MOST LIKELY TO EXPERIENCE THIS ACTIVITY INCLUDE

MUCH OF ARKANSAS
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS
EASTERN AND SOUTHERN MISSOURI
EASTERN OKLAHOMA

SURROUNDING THE MODERATE RISK AREA...THERE IS A SLIGHT RISK OF
SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS FROM THE ERN SOUTHERN PLAINS NEWD ACROSS THE
MISSISSIPPI AND WRN PORTIONS OF THE TN/OH VALLEYS.

Original Source: National Weather Service Storm Prediction Center


Another round of severe weather has been forecast to errupt later in the day tomorrow as warm air will continue to be over the region, with temperatures remaining 15 to 20 degrees above normal reaching the lower to upper 60's into Northern Iowa.

The Storm Prediction Center has released this Public Severe Weather Outlook for areas within the Central Plains region which have a threat of severe thunderstorms in the next 48 hours.

SPC: Severe Weather Convection Outlooks Day 2




posted on Mar, 11 2006 @ 11:58 AM
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I have been looking at this system on the computer models since yesterday morning and this looks like we could have a widespread severe weather event.

Anyone who lives in or near the area shown in the day 2 covective outlook
should pay close attention to the weather tomorow.

Check the batteries in your weather radio and keep an eye to the sky.

jfy



posted on Mar, 11 2006 @ 12:00 PM
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I'm looking forward to tomorrow, as I do live in the areas shaded for both today and tomorrow, hopefully we get more liquid type events as we are in a severe drought, currently at our location on the Mississippi River, you can walk across it, it's that low.


BRING ON THE RAIN!



posted on Mar, 11 2006 @ 06:50 PM
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thats looks bad!

Make sure you stay as safe as you can, and keep us updated,




posted on Mar, 11 2006 @ 09:30 PM
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Well the tornado risk has subsided for the most, still tornado watches but they're far east and south of here at least, tomorrow is the big day for severe weather, so we'll have to watch then, a total of 4 tornado reports so far, since March 6 this makes a total of 5 tornadoes.

NOAA CSV Storm Reports for 3/11/2006



posted on Mar, 11 2006 @ 10:04 PM
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Just west of St.Louis here and just medium grade thunderstorm right now.....50 miles to the south is going thru hell right now from the way the radar looks and what the weatherman says 1 confirmed touch down of possible F3,F4 tornado,and three other possible but unconfirmed as of just a few minutes ago.

And there is another storm brewing behind these.


Local news


Simon



posted on Mar, 12 2006 @ 02:01 AM
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The Storm Prediction Center has just released it's new Day 2/1 Convective outlooks.

They're now forecasting a significant severe weather outbreak within the next 24 hours of this post. The following is the event probability tables:

Severe Weather Risk: [color=FF0000]High
Tornado Risk: [color=FF0000]30%
Hail Risk: [color=cc00cc]45%
Wind Risk: [color=cc00cc]45%

More information located via the Day 1 Convective Outlooks:
www.spc.noaa.gov...



posted on Mar, 12 2006 @ 02:18 AM
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South of Saint Louis MO got pounded tonight and its still going on.

Link

Its a little early for this type of weather.



posted on Mar, 12 2006 @ 12:53 PM
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On the other side of things , i live north of Vegas, about 1 to 2 hours out. it hasnt snowed here in years, but there is like 7-8 inchs out side and still coming down. Wierd weather, its normaly this time of the year around 70 plus in temp. just thought i would say the weather over here is just as wierd as yours just the other side of thigs.



posted on Mar, 12 2006 @ 01:14 PM
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Ours isn't exactly weird, as we're now going through the transaction from spring to summer, where we get temps in the 30's and 40's clashing with 60's and 70's. This provides a nice unstable air environment for severe thunderstorms over this region. It's just about a week early is all.



posted on Mar, 12 2006 @ 01:58 PM
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You were right on in your assessment of the impending storm activity.

Tornadoes Rip Across Midwest, Killing Two

Judging by the weather here on the west coast yesterday evening, it isn't over yet, and you are in for another wallop this evening or tomorrow.

[edit on 12-3-2006 by Icarus Rising]



posted on Mar, 12 2006 @ 02:19 PM
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I am on the North side of the system in Central Minnesota.

We are under a Winter Storm Warning with 8-10 inches of snow expected overnight along with 25-30 mph winds.

Current Temperature in Des Moines IA is 42 While jus a couple hours away
Kansas City is reporting 62 Deg. F

jfy



posted on Mar, 12 2006 @ 02:27 PM
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I have been watching this system for several days myself (I am in south central Indiana about an hour away from the illinois state line). I have noticed how hyped this system has become, and how serious the warnings for people to seek for safety and stay on their toes. Lucky me, I live in a mobile home! Of course, I am not in the High forecast zone, but that is little assurance.
We have been dealing with severe weather since January, what with the unseasonable temperatures. If this keeps up, we're looking at a very active storm season.
Flooding is already widespread here, and we're expecting a couple of more inches of rain this evening into over night. Roads I have never seen flooded in my life were flooded due to our latest severe storm last night (around 2 inches of rain). And while flooding in this area is not really devastating, it still poses a danger; and we've a fair chance for tornadic activity tonight (s. Indiana has already had a few this month alone, with at least one in both Jan and Feb if I am not mistaken).
Keep your eyes to the sky, everybody; enjoy the show but stay safe!



posted on Mar, 12 2006 @ 11:33 PM
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Originally posted by LDragonFire
South of Saint Louis MO got pounded tonight and its still going on.

Link

Its a little early for this type of weather.


I used to live in western Ohio, and you are certainly right. Its WAY too early for this weather. Another month is when it should start.



posted on Mar, 13 2006 @ 01:23 AM
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Originally posted by Skadi_the_Evil_Elf
I used to live in western Ohio, and you are certainly right. Its WAY too early for this weather. Another month is when it should start.


Not in this region, we are approximately 14 days ahead of schedule. But this isn't as early as 2000, where the season began in February.

It's early, yes, too early? Nope.


Needless to say we have received 4 inches of rain, and rain is still on they way, hopefully it assists our drought.



posted on Mar, 14 2006 @ 03:32 PM
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Two nights ago, around 11pm, me and my friend headed out in the weather. It was really tame for the most part, but when we hit the highway one of the downpours hit (We were supposed to be pretty much out of the bad part of the storm, so I can only imagine what the trouble areas were like.) The rain was coming down so hard it wouldn't allow the car to accelerate past 60mph.

Anyway, then the visability became zero, and people were going about 30mph on the highway, one guy was stopped in the middle of the road. Two other vehicles and ours formed a threeway line to finally light the way a bit. But it was pretty intense, and it makes you wonder how people are going to handle this when it becomes more common.



posted on Mar, 14 2006 @ 04:59 PM
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I'm going to contribute to my own thread
This relates to a report by the SPC/NWS of damage on 3/12 note, NOAA says even that they do not have full numbers yet.



AS OF 134 PM THE FOLLOWING STATISTICS WERE GATHERED ON CONFIRMATION
TORNADOES 056 TORNADOES 007 MAJOR TORNADOES 115 ACCOUNTS

...

OFFICIALLY THIS SEVERE WEATHER EVENT IS CLASSED AS MINOR. AS THERE WERE NOT ENOUGH TORNADOES CONFIRMED ON THE GROUND.
FUNNEL CLOUDS DO NOT ENTER OFFICIAL TORNADIC COUNTS DUE TO THE ISOLATED CONDITIONS OF EACH..HOWEVER NOAA HAS CALCULATED
AT LEAST 43 FUNNEL CLOUDS THAT DID NOT TOUCH DOWN. THIS BRINGS AN OVERALL COUNT OF 99 TORNADIC THUNDERSTORMS TO THE
CHARTS. WHILE THIS WAS A MAJOR EVENT. THESE NUMBERS DO NOT WARRANT AN INVESTIGATIVE PROOF OF A SIGNIFICANT OR SEVERE
OUTBREAK.

A TOTAL OF 11 DEATHS AND AT LEAST 3000 INJURIES HAVE BEEN COUNTED AND TOLLED SO FAR...AND AN ADDITIONAL NOTE OF AT LEAST
ANOTHER 1000 MISSING IN MISSOURI AND ILLINOIS. NOAA AND FEMA HAVE CONFIRMED AT LEAST 56,000 WITHOUT POWER IN MISSOURI AS
AN APPARENT TORNADO HAD DEMOLISHED A POWER FACILITY. EMERGENCY MANAGERS ACROSS THE REGION ARE CURRENTLY LOOKING FURTHER
INTO THE FAILURE OF WARNING ALARM SYSTEMS IN EASTERN KANSAS AND WESTERN MISSOURI. AT LEAST 13000 ARE HOMELESS ACCORDING
TO LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES ACROSS THE REGION...FURTHER INVESTIGATION WILL TOLL THE NUMBERS AT THE END OF THIS
MONTH.

...

NOAA WILL CONTINUE TO LOOK INTO THE SEVERE WEATHER REPORTS AS THEY ARE RECEIVED AS IT MAY TAKE AN ADDITIONAL 7 DAYS TO
TALLY AND CONFIRM ALL REPORTS. A SEVERE WEATHER SITREP WILL BE ISSUED AT THE END OF THE MONTH COVERING THIS SITUATION
AND OTHERS WHICH MAY OCCUR LATER THIS MONTH.


Source: NOAA

[edit on 3-14-2006 by Shugo]



posted on Mar, 23 2006 @ 03:33 PM
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We've got our first severe weather of 2006 for South Florida

Tornado Warning Issued For NE Broward County

The National Weather Service has issued a tornado warning for northeastern Broward County until 4:15 p.m.

At 3:06 p.m., NWS Doppler radar indicated a severe thunderstorm capable of producing a tornado near Coral Springs, moving east at 10 mph.


I'm in Northwest Broward...(phew)




[edit on 3-23-2006 by worldwatcher]



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