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Harvesting jupiters atmosphere

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posted on Mar, 8 2006 @ 12:00 PM
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I was watching daily planet and saw an interesting little tid bit about jupiter.
It was mentioning how there is a second red spot that has formed and a little bit of dynamics on the weather systems themselves.

It was interesting enough until i asked myself what is the atmospherical composition of jupiter, what would these massive storms do to things.

I looked it up and found it qite disturbing indeed, An overview of jupiter's atmospherical composition.

There's quite a bit of valuable reources in hydrogen slufur and helium for advanced technology and stuff, so we could harvest it for say space ship refuelling. The only problem I saw was that hydrogen sulfide forms, I think that means theres a good chance theres practically sulfuric acid as gas in the air. also theres ammonia that forms too. That seems somewhat insanely corrosive to me.

Anyway there's also the matter of things being ripped of the planets surface by the massive storms and launching it into sub orbital trajectories.

As for haresting that makes it extremely difficult but i be it's worth it when we become a space faring species. I created an offspin idea about how this atmospheric make up could be used with gravity based weapons lol. It's a crazy morning theory from reading a few sci fi books and reading to much ats.
have fun.

gravity based atmospheric weapons?




posted on Mar, 9 2006 @ 01:43 AM
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Okay I was a bit vague this morning because i was being rushed, my aunt hates it when i'm clicking the keys, I go pretty fast lol.

Anyway, I was really thinking more along the lines of what the atmosphere from jupiter could be used for. I know there is a lot of hydrogen already here on earth . But what about the massive amounts of helium, not to mention the deeper down the more ridiculous the material becomes.

The core is made up of crazy things like metallic liquid hydrogen, basically super steel. It's under immense gravitational force by the liquid hydrogen surface of the planet above it, therefore providing sufficient pressure for crystaline formations in steels and carbon. Theres irons and silicones in the core with the liquid hydrogen.

My bet is the core of jupiter would play some valuable roles in gravity research and most likely magnetism of super heavy elements.



posted on Mar, 9 2006 @ 10:11 AM
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Jupiter is a gas giant. There are no liquid or solid surfaces/cores/ineteriors.



posted on Mar, 9 2006 @ 10:47 AM
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okay then why when i looked up the words jupiter's core composition did i get the answers of this.

jupiters core composition results from google.

Now tell me with a webpage or link that i'm wrong. I'm not saying i'm right just that there's lot's of things to back up liquid hydrogen mantle and a core of really heavy things



posted on Mar, 9 2006 @ 11:18 AM
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If you take Inorganic Chemistry, you'll learn that everything turns into a metal under high enough pressure and low enough temperature.

If you take Physical Chemistry or Thermodynamics, you'll learn that all elements have gas-liquid-solid states. Extrapolation of data allows prediction of even liquid hydrogen.

As far as building a spacecraft to extract materials from Jupiter... there are some difficulties.

It is unknown if Jupiter actually has a spot you can land a spacecraft. You would have to design a spacecraft that is not only capable of interplanetary travel, but must also be able to hover in the air and gather resources. Already helicopters and Harrier jets suck up lots of fuel in stationary hovering. I'd hate to see the gas mileage of a billion-ton spacecraft.

Then there is the fact that a round trip to Mars will apparently cost in the trillions of dollars. Jupiter will be MUCH more expensive. The idea of cost-vs-payout does not look prospective to anyone. A car made from Jupiterian Steel would cost $100 billion.

It sounds like the makeup of what is on Jupiter already exists in GREAT abundance here on Earth already. Sulfer, Silicon, Nitrogen, Hydrogen, Oxygen... they are the most abundant elements around. Iron is a first-row transition metal, which are all in high abundance as well. We just need to learn to recycle stuff and not waste as much as we do. Instead of a trip to Jupiter to find raw resources, we need to take a trip to the garbage dumps around America to find them. I'm sure we'd do great.



posted on Mar, 9 2006 @ 11:36 AM
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Originally posted by Frosty
Jupiter is a gas giant. There are no liquid or solid surfaces/cores/ineteriors.


Alot of scientist now think Jupiter has a interoir made up of a shell of metallic hydrogen about 25,000 mi. (40,000 km.) thick. More of a slush or tar.




Hydrogen molecules are so tightly packed that they break up and become electrically conductive. Scientists believe it is this electrically conductive liquid that causes Jupiter's intense magnetic field.


Many scientists also theorize that beneath this layer is a small solid core one-and-a-half times Earth's diameter.

Its really all the realm of scientific theory when it comes to the interior and core either way.

I personally think it would be smarter to think about harvestings some thing like the methane on Saturns moon Titan theres thought to be oceans of the stuff.


www2.jpl.nasa.gov...

www.museum.vic.gov.au...



[edit on 9-3-2006 by ShadowXIX]



posted on Mar, 9 2006 @ 11:50 AM
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Originally posted by ShadowXIX

Originally posted by Frosty
Jupiter is a gas giant. There are no liquid or solid surfaces/cores/ineteriors.


Alot of scientist now think Jupiter has a interoir made up of a shell of metallic hydrogen about 25,000 mi. (40,000 km.) thick. More of a slush or tar.




Hydrogen molecules are so tightly packed that they break up and become electrically conductive. Scientists believe it is this electrically conductive liquid that causes Jupiter's intense magnetic field.


Many scientists also theorize that beneath this layer is a small solid core one-and-a-half times Earth's diameter.

Its really all the realm of scientific theory when it comes to the interior and core either way.

I personally think it would be smarter to think about harvestings some thing like the methane on Saturns moon Titan theres thought to be oceans of the stuff.


www2.jpl.nasa.gov...

www.museum.vic.gov.au...



[edit on 9-3-2006 by ShadowXIX]


Shadow you quoted one of the sentences that i based some of my theory on. I stated this was mostly theory in the beginning too i believe. Anyway
What would an ocean of swirling magnetic hydrogen due to a small solid core of the heavier elements obviously.
I bet the core is more magnetic than the hyrogen and the hydrogen is actually reacting causing it's own currents and such.


Oh and yes I understand how difficult it would be to actually harvest anything from jupiter, satruns moon is a obviously better. But we're a long way off.

Anyway Mostly i just want to know what's at jupiters core now. It started as a fascination with the two red spots lol.



posted on Mar, 9 2006 @ 12:07 PM
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Well some of the more radical theories on the core even have it being made of diamond. Like some believe is the case with Neptune infact some think it even rains diamonds there





Here's the coolest thing: SCIENTISTS THINK THAT IT IS RAINING GIANT DIAMONDS ON NEPTUNE!! That's right - raining diamonds! A simulation of Neptune's atmosphere was recently done at University of California, Berkeley... and it produced diamond dust. So, they think with all the carbon in Neptune's atmosphere and the extreme pressure on that planet that it may be, literally, raining giant diamonds


***Bling Bling***


www.sciencemonster.com...




Whether the central rocky core is in the form of a 'diamond' or not is not something that could be easily anticipated from the mathematical modeling of the planet's interior. In other words, Arthur's guess is as good as anyones!



www.astronomycafe.net...



posted on Mar, 9 2006 @ 12:15 PM
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I've read somewhere about this theory that some extrasolar terrestrial type planets may have a diamond crust. The theory states that since silica and it's derivatives are abundant in the Earth's composition, there may be planets out that that have carbon derivatives in abundance in its composition.

Heh. One planet's precious mineral may be another planets junk material.



posted on Mar, 9 2006 @ 12:59 PM
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well if the core of jupiter were worth mining, how would it be possible. There must be some sci fi material as well as theories about possible technology requisettes.

The neptune thing rocks. I bet the dust would form and then fall as it conglomerates into biger crystal forms. It hit the ground eventually and seeps into the ground making the planet like one of those giant rocks with the crystals on the inside and a big rock look on the outside. sweet



posted on Mar, 9 2006 @ 01:03 PM
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I don't know.... I seriously doubt we can ever mine the core of Jupiter. Even the advanced Federation in Star Trek had trouble going any deeper than a couple hundred kilometers into the atmosphere of a J class planet (Jupiter-type gas giants).



posted on Mar, 9 2006 @ 02:41 PM
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Current data from the latest astrophysical equipment still suggest that there is no solid or liquid features to Jupiter (on such a scale).
There is a problem with Jupiter having liquid and especially solid features in that it is more likely to fuse the hydrogen before sucha thing occurs. Any liquid feature is probably do to pressure.

This is what I could find:

The gas planets do not have solid surfaces, their gaseous material simply gets denser with depth


www.nineplanets.org...



posted on Mar, 10 2006 @ 01:47 PM
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if a gas gets denser with depth would it not become a liquid?



posted on Mar, 10 2006 @ 03:07 PM
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It is amazing how people want to go to Jupiter to get energy and other resources, ignoring the fact that all these materials shortages are engineered by financial cartels to get as much money as the market will bear. Sure necessity is the mother of invention and all that, but doing nothing about monopoly cartels but watch them steamroll over everyone is so easy. The whole issue is about just compensation in a sea of work, not about going to jupiter. Will all that jupiter methane and so forth be cartel free, well let's work on that 24 hours a day, otherwise it is just a delusion.



posted on Mar, 11 2006 @ 10:16 AM
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skip shipman, I would like to point out that the forum i posted the thread in is science and technology not conspiracy and bureacracy.
Thus far this whole conversation has been about nothing other than hyothesy over whether or not there is anything to harvest on jupiter.
secondly if it is even possible, and what it would take to do it,

But your opinion is noted. There is plenty of material on our planet to do things with let alone jupiter.

It was a curiousity of sorts though. I'm pretty sure that it would be more like a sport for extremely rich space faring people in the future. the space adrenaline junkies if you will.




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