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Should the U.S. Navy copy the Russian teardrop shape sail?

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posted on Feb, 23 2006 @ 06:25 PM
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It would have looked cooler in my view, not to mention more streamlined compare to the conventional sails on the Los Angeles to the Virginia class submarines. Less drag and more quieter.




posted on Feb, 23 2006 @ 11:53 PM
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I always wondered why the US have these big vertical sails or even why you need them that large. The russian one seems to push the water back more better.

Germanys U214 looks like a good example also


[edit on 23-2-2006 by chinawhite]



posted on Feb, 24 2006 @ 02:15 AM
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US sails are much thinner which = less surface area and would cut through the water better. If you look at them from the top they are also the classic tear drop shape which creates the least drag of any shape. Its pretty much the best shape for speed.



posted on Feb, 24 2006 @ 01:53 PM
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Shadow XIX pretty much has it correct. THe ultimate trick would be to not need a sail at all or failing this to greatly reduce the height of the sail.
If you look at US Navy Sails since the Sea Wolf series they have a curve on the front of them instead of breaking the water at 90 degrees in the Los Angeles series boats.
The Russians use a pretty wide sail structure at the base...more surface area. This also means more hollow space inside unless you find a way to fill it..like pour someting in it to fill up the vibrating void.

Thanks,
Orangetom



posted on Feb, 24 2006 @ 05:54 PM
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US sails allow the subs to punch through ice up north.



posted on Feb, 24 2006 @ 06:49 PM
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Not all US Submarines are under ice capable. I requires a reinforced sail structure and some other modifications which I wont mention here.

You posted:

"US sails allow the subs to punch through ice up north."

What you see in older submarines is the fairwater planes on the side of the sail move straight up vertical. This was eliminated on later models..this under ice feature. This changed when the fairwater planes were removed from the sails completely in the 688I series boats. These have retractable bow planes in the foreward end of the ballast tanks. Under ice breakthroughs are done with the bow planes retracted.
If you are not specifically under ice capable you will damage the very expensive masts and snorkel systems mounted in the Sail. Very expensive to replace and repair.

Thanks,
Orangetom



posted on Feb, 24 2006 @ 06:57 PM
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The USN is planning a blended sail like this one for the fifth & sixth vessels of the Virginia class. It will be used as a stowage area for UUV's, UAV's or equipment for SEAL teams.

It's already been tested on LSV Kokanee, a 1/4 scale test vehicle for the Seawolf class subs.

Source.

[edit on 2/24/06 by xmotex]



posted on Feb, 24 2006 @ 07:13 PM
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This is a attempt to make these boats more flexable. More equipment would be stored in the Sails than previously done. Part of the littorial flexability intended by design This would also not be a under ice sail..with all this equipment stowed in the sail. To delicate to be damaged by breaking through ice packs.

Thanks,
Orangetom



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