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US Flag in Over There - TV Related Question

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posted on Feb, 21 2006 @ 06:32 PM
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Not sure this is the right forum - and maybe a dumb question. I have been following the Fx series "Over There" on Sky TV here for the last few weeks. Can anybody tell me why the US flag on uniforms and in most of the show is inverted - ie the stars on the right hand side of the flag on a shoulder insignia throughout the show ? At first I put this down to somekind of camera gaff - reversed negative type shot - but its seems consistant throughout the show. Am I missing something here or do US troops in the gulf wear their insignia this way?

(Edit to ensure the context is shown)

[edit on 21-2-2006 by Silk]




posted on Feb, 21 2006 @ 06:41 PM
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I'm interested in hearing the answer to this one also......



posted on Feb, 21 2006 @ 06:44 PM
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in tonights ep here in the UK the flag outside the hospital one of the troops leaves is also shown inverted - in actuality (probably because of the wind) BUT also in refection on the windows. However the flag in the Capts office (hung on the wall) is correct orientation - but kowing US feelings about the flag having it draped vertically may also be for some reason?



posted on Feb, 21 2006 @ 06:45 PM
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No its not a camera trick, its the way all US soldiers wear the flag, it is worn as it would if it was being flown.

The full-color U.S. flag cloth replica is worn so that the star field faces forward, or to the flag’s own right. When worn in this manner, the flag is facing to the observer’s right, and gives the effect of the flag flying in the breeze as the wearer moves forward.

The rule dates back to the Army's early history, when both mounted cavalry and infantry units would designate a standard bearer, who carried the Colors into battle. As he charged, his forward momentum caused the flag to stream back. Since the Stars and Stripes are mounted with the canton closest to the pole, that section stayed to the right, while the stripes flew to the left.

Also, it is worn in the right arm because in the military the place of honor is to a members right.

[edit on 21-2-2006 by WestPoint23]



posted on Feb, 21 2006 @ 06:48 PM
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It has been bugging me for a week or so - it just looks so wrong to an uneducated person - and of course I our Union Jack has no front or back just a right way up (funny how many times fils can get that one wrong ifog).



posted on Feb, 22 2006 @ 07:40 AM
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Flying the Union Flag (not Jack!) upside down is a recognised distress signal - perhaps the Army is playing its own little joke?



posted on Feb, 22 2006 @ 08:23 AM
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Originally posted by Strangerous
Flying the Union Flag (not Jack!) upside down is a recognised distress signal - perhaps the Army is playing its own little joke?



Not talking about the flag being upside down, but about the flag being inverted. When the flag is draped on a building the stars are on your left if you are facing the flag. In the case of a falling soldier the stars are over the heart or the soldiers left. If the flag is mounted on a wall in the same position as if it were flying, then the stars will be on your left as you are facing it. On the Uniform the stars are on your right as you are facing it to simulate flying while moving forward as West Point stated!


www.ushistory.org...

[edit on 22-2-2006 by WHOFLUNGGUM]

[edit on 22-2-2006 by WHOFLUNGGUM]

[edit on 22-2-2006 by WHOFLUNGGUM]



posted on Feb, 22 2006 @ 09:19 AM
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Originally posted by Silk
It has been bugging me for a week or so - it just looks so wrong to an uneducated person - and of course I our Union Jack has no front or back just a right way up (funny how many times fils can get that one wrong ifog).

As strangerous mentioned mate its called the union, not the jack unless its on the jackstay of a warship.

Hence why MN dont salute when they come onboard thier ship but RN and SCC do.




posted on Feb, 24 2006 @ 03:48 PM
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The full-color U.S. flag cloth replica is worn so that the star field faces forward, or to the flag’s own right. When worn in this manner, the flag is facing to the observer’s right, and gives the effect of the flag flying in the breeze as the wearer moves forward.


Yep. You'll see the same thing on vehicles too.



posted on Feb, 24 2006 @ 04:11 PM
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Most militaries who have asymmetric flags use it the same way (at least all scandinavian countries with cross flags) all tough some like Finnish army wear the flags and unit insignia on left arm)



posted on Feb, 24 2006 @ 04:45 PM
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Anyone ever seen the film "The Last Castle" with Robert Redford and James Gandolfini? In the end he hangs the flag upside down. This is a crime to my understanding, can anyone point out to me why this is besides the obvious disrespect? Or is that the sole reason this is not to be done?



posted on Feb, 25 2006 @ 12:59 AM
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Hanging the US flag upside down is Distres signal, it basically says"This Fortess has fallen to enemy hands" it's only to be used in such situation.



posted on Feb, 25 2006 @ 01:05 AM
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In "The Last Castle", Robert Redford says he is going to hang the flag upside down but he raises the flag right side up. Great movie by the way.



posted on Feb, 25 2006 @ 01:35 AM
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Ahhh, thanks for clarifying that guys.




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