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Ford Re-Invents the Hybrid (400% more efficiency)

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posted on Feb, 15 2006 @ 03:42 PM
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One of the biggest marketing campaign of cars is fuel economy...which amazingly some people choose there vehicle based on that...and not what they will use it for, and its looks. That could change...Hybrids are quickly gaining steam...But who wants a tiny car that gets 80mpg that can only seat a couple people, and looks ugly and the performance side is even worse.(?)

Ford is Re-Inventing the Hybrid, Current hybrids use lith-ion batteries to store the energy, But Ford is planning on a much more efficient method...Hydraulic.



The F-150 makes for a perfect host for Hydraulic Hybrid technology because of its height and body on frame construction, adding this system to smaller vehicles will be challenging, but with those kind of numbers small vehicles as we know them may become obsolete...The Hydraulic F-150 is currently scheduled for launch in August of 2008

read the Bold...I love that part.


I think that this tech is great...and finally the day is comming when a SUV driver can yell at a Geo driver for not caring about the environment.


Ford Re-Invents Hybrid (300% more efficient than Toyota Prius Hybrid)




posted on Feb, 15 2006 @ 03:45 PM
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Wow!
What a dramatic change.

I'm glad to see that this trend in automotives is still moving forward. It would be nice to live in a city without smog.



posted on Feb, 15 2006 @ 04:02 PM
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Funny I thought most of them used NiMH batteries as Lith-Ion batteries become well explosive when they are large enough.



posted on Feb, 15 2006 @ 05:05 PM
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Originally posted by sardion2000
Funny I thought most of them used NiMH batteries as Lith-Ion batteries become well explosive when they are large enough.


ahh...yep ur right...but apparently they will be lith-ion in the future.(?)



That in itself is not revolutionary, except for the fact that Nickel Metal Hydride batteries used today are not an efficient way to store energy, and hydraulic storage blows them away with 3X the efficiency. Even next generation Lithium Ion batteries do not come close to Hydraulic Energy Storage.



posted on Feb, 15 2006 @ 05:11 PM
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Well if this new technology pans out then most likely not. I'm rather glad that Ford is starting to figure out that their future is in innovation rather then regurgitation.



posted on Feb, 16 2006 @ 02:42 AM
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I read the article, but Im still confused about what exactly hydraulic cylinders are. Are these some form of battery or are they storage for actual hydraulic force? Im confused.

I noticed they havnt mentioned anything about HP and torque. I wonder if these super efficient pickups will still be able to pull a boat or trailer behind them and do everything they do now. I hope it works out though, 3x more efficient then a a prius...wow
Sign me up



posted on Feb, 16 2006 @ 07:38 AM
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I think it's technical name is a Hydralic Accumulator.

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Feb, 16 2006 @ 07:48 AM
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While this is a wonderful idea for the environment if they cannot match the output of the standard internal combustion engine in terms of torque and horsepower then its going to flop. Nobody is going to buy a truck that gets 80+mpg but can barely pull its own weight let along a bedload of something or a trailer. Also I wonder about the safety of keeping such a pressurized tank on a car, I know a hydraulic technician who describes a pinhole leak in industrial hydralic systems as something that will remove body parts if you get in the way.



posted on Feb, 16 2006 @ 08:46 AM
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I will NEVER drive a hybrid. I will gladly be the polluter who is hauling ass in my blown 68 camaro, loud as hell. 4 miles a gallon is no problem by me. Plus, once all these hybrids come along, gas prices start dropping, hopefully, and 8 miles a gallon cost as much as 35 mpg. Nothing better than the low idle of a blown small block chevy. Wop-Wop_Wop WOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOP (Tires Smoking)

Train



posted on Feb, 16 2006 @ 09:46 AM
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Here's what I understand about it.

Hydraulic cylinders are pumped up to pressure by a pump - presumably driveshaft driven - during deceleration.
About 5000 psi is stored in the cylinders.

Next time the vehicle stops or acceleration is required, the computer senses such and allows the hydraulic cylinders to drive a hydraulic motor connected to the driveshaft.
When the hydraulic cylinders are bled off the vehicle should have been accelerated to the point the driver wants.

Ford calls it a hydraulic launch system.

It makes sense that it saves fuel, even with the original Ford diesel pickup engine, the costly part in terms of fuel economy is accelerating to speed.
Cruise doesn't take near the fuel acceleration does and for that reason the engine remains as it is now and towing heavy loads will still be pretty much like it always was.

Ford is installing the hydraulic system on their larger trucks, I'm guessing not the large tractor trailer rigs, but the 2-3 ton flatbeds, vans, F-350 pickups and the like.

Scaled down hydraulics et al will be installed on smaller cars later, but my guess is they won't have to go down too small.
A Taurus sized car would be pretty efficient and still large enough to allow installation of the requisite hydraulic system.

Like Big Train, I like hot rods as well.
Although I have a daily driver for most stuff and would not hesitate to buy a hydraulically assisted vehicle when they become available.

I am surprised at only 4 mpg with the Camaro.
My 400 horsepower roadster gets 10-16 mpg depending on whether you're in town or on the highway.


(Edited for clarity.)


[edit on 16-2-2006 by Desert Dawg]



posted on Feb, 16 2006 @ 09:50 AM
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Desert Dawg would you drive this beast if it gets developed to the point where it gets at least a 500 km range?



www.drive.com.au...



This radical eight-wheeled, 600kW rocket from Japan is proof that electric cars can be fast and fun.

Called Eliica, short for Electric Lithium-Ion battery Car, it boasts a neck-snapping 0-100kmh time of just four seconds and a 0-160kmh time of seven seconds, which means the Eliica accelerates faster than a Porsche 911 Turbo.


Offtopic I know but Electric drive can outperform even the most souped up hotrod given enough time for the technology to develop.

[edit on 16-2-2006 by sardion2000]



posted on Feb, 16 2006 @ 10:09 AM
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Originally posted by sardion2000
Desert Dawg would you drive this beast if it gets developed to the point where it gets at least a 500 km range?



www.drive.com.au...



This radical eight-wheeled, 600kW rocket from Japan is proof that electric cars can be fast and fun.

Called Eliica, short for Electric Lithium-Ion battery Car, it boasts a neck-snapping 0-100kmh time of just four seconds and a 0-160kmh time of seven seconds, which means the Eliica accelerates faster than a Porsche 911 Turbo.


Offtopic I know but Electric drive can outperform even the most souped up hotrod given enough time for the technology to develop.

[edit on 16-2-2006 by sardion2000]



Yes I would . . . even if it had only a 200-300 km range.

Right now, electric cars can't really touch hot rods in terms of acceleration or top speed.
Even so, I'm fairly sure battery and solar panel technology will advance rapidly in the next few years.

100 km = 62 mph if I did the math right and I'm fairly sure my roadster can do zero to 60 mph in the four second range and match the zero to 160 km - which equals 100 mph - time.

The way the car is set up now, it should be able to run zero to 115 mph in the high 11 to low 12 second range.

And if that isn't enough, I'm sure my little brothers 1952 Henry J sporting 1040 horsepower that turns in times of 166 mph in 8.13 seconds would do it.


All kidding aside, the times for that electric car are very fast compared to other street driven electric vehicles I've read about.
With virtually full torque available at zero rpm, I see why they are using four rear wheels to drive the car.

I like it's looks as well . . . and that's saying a lot coming from a guy who likes Model A and 32 Ford roadsters.



posted on Feb, 16 2006 @ 10:46 AM
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I was just having a good laugh. I do not own a 68 blown camaro, but one day i really want to buy an old one and completely rebuild it.

This hydraulic idea is not new for ford, they used it in their concept truck a few years back called the Tonka. It used the exact same idea. That is the truck I WOULD buy. I will need a truck like that for my job.

Train



posted on Feb, 18 2006 @ 04:18 PM
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Originally posted by BigTrain
I will NEVER drive a hybrid. I will gladly be the polluter who is hauling ass in my blown 68 camaro, loud as hell. 4 miles a gallon is no problem by me. Plus, once all these hybrids come along, gas prices start dropping, hopefully, and 8 miles a gallon cost as much as 35 mpg. Nothing better than the low idle of a blown small block chevy. Wop-Wop_Wop WOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOP (Tires Smoking)

Train


A fellow F-Body enthusiast on this board? Neat. (EDIT: I just noticed you said you don't own one, but you seem like a fan anyway. :p )

Once the rest of the world starts driving electric cars, driving a few hot rods per town won't have such a big impact on the environment. Right now with the big diesel trucks polluting more than ten hot rods combined (not to mention airplanes!!), it really has me upset, as the rest of the public must follow such strict smog laws. Besides,...hot rods/modified cars don't end up being daily drivers anyway, yet they are subject to the most strict rules.
I think finding an alternative to current airplane technology is pretty important, if not more important than automobile technology. They do much of the polluting, and with thousands of flights every day, all over the world, I think that's a pretty big impact!
I could be wrong of course. Its all speculation.


[edit on 18-2-2006 by 2manyquestions]



posted on Feb, 21 2006 @ 10:58 AM
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Originally posted by 2manyquestions

Originally posted by BigTrain
I will NEVER drive a hybrid. I will gladly be the polluter who is hauling ass in my blown 68 camaro, loud as hell. 4 miles a gallon is no problem by me. Plus, once all these hybrids come along, gas prices start dropping, hopefully, and 8 miles a gallon cost as much as 35 mpg. Nothing better than the low idle of a blown small block chevy. Wop-Wop_Wop WOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOP (Tires Smoking)

Train


A fellow F-Body enthusiast on this board? Neat. (EDIT: I just noticed you said you don't own one, but you seem like a fan anyway. :p )

Once the rest of the world starts driving electric cars, driving a few hot rods per town won't have such a big impact on the environment. Right now with the big diesel trucks polluting more than ten hot rods combined (not to mention airplanes!!), it really has me upset, as the rest of the public must follow such strict smog laws. Besides,...hot rods/modified cars don't end up being daily drivers anyway, yet they are subject to the most strict rules.
I think finding an alternative to current airplane technology is pretty important, if not more important than automobile technology. They do much of the polluting, and with thousands of flights every day, all over the world, I think that's a pretty big impact!
I could be wrong of course. Its all speculation.


[edit on 18-2-2006 by 2manyquestions]


If you were talking to me - and I think you were - I own a 2002 F150 SuperCrew.
46,000 miles with no problems.
They are a well thought out vehicle and it did well summer before last during our move from Central California to N/W Arizona.
10 mpg towing 7000# worth of trailer and stuff.
A/C on in ambient temps up to 107, climbed long and steep desert grades with no problems.
(5.4 liter engine.)

Good ride and comfortable seats were the main reason Sweetie chose it . . . she calls it "her" truck....



posted on Mar, 4 2006 @ 09:36 AM
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This is very interesting. I wonder how much energy can this hydraulic cylinder store? As in terms of acceleration. I understand that a big advantage would be the ability to use alot of the energy (pressure) all at once for a quick boost on take off but what about sustained use on a long trip wouldn't the mileage be about the same as a standard internal combustion engine? I wonder if one could possible get the best of both worlds with a electric engine to assist in cruising a hydraulic pressure system to provide quick takeoff and a internal combustion engine to fill in the gaps.



posted on Mar, 4 2006 @ 04:18 PM
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GOOD!people will finally stop putting down hummers lol, no but it is great news that they are doing that, and the fact that its is an american car instead of a japanese car, because everywhere you look there is a japanese car and they are dominating the market, and its about time american cars are making a come back, go ford



posted on Mar, 4 2006 @ 04:36 PM
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Well hopefully this will increase Ford's value (the company) to the new owner when they file for bankruptcy and lure in a buyer.



posted on Mar, 4 2006 @ 07:08 PM
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Once when my car was in the shop for body repairs, I rented a car with my insurance coverage, and somehow got a GEO. There were many reasons why I was glad to get my Civic back, mostly having to do with creature comforts, but I have to tell you that that was one of the quickest cars I have ever driven and I'm pretty sure it only had about 75 hp. Sometimes performance comes in odd packages.



posted on Mar, 4 2006 @ 09:12 PM
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What happens to the batteries when spent?....More land fill?....I think electric power ..well and good as it is now ...(finally getting the manufacturers to start building alternate fuelled vehicles)...are only a fleeting concept.What is wrong with hydrogen?...completely green as well as being able to be powered up as technology increases....or what if we utilise the "anti-gravity" our friends from Zeta Reticculi use.

I must admit though.,there is nothing better than the sound of a thumping eight IC engine accelerating and decelerating I don't think i could get used to the phht phhtt sound of an electric car...so let the world bring alternate fuelled cars ...and I will bring my Phase 3 from the garage on a sunday morn and let rip.




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