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Lies About the Titanic?

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posted on Feb, 13 2006 @ 07:36 PM
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At work the other day I was informed about some new evidence that might prove that the tragedy of the titanic did not happen like it is taught in history books. Apperently the ship was built to withstand that kind of trauma and stay afloat long enough for rescue to show up - looks like the Titanic was not only struck by an iceberg...

There's a documentary about it on the history channel on the 26th of this month. I have some online info about it as well if you're interested...




posted on Feb, 13 2006 @ 07:44 PM
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I have some online info about it as well if you're interested...

Very....

Can you post the links? Thanks



posted on Feb, 13 2006 @ 09:11 PM
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hmmm. i think that it was built with steel that had a higher percentage of something. This made it weaker then todays steel, my science teacher told me if the steel was the same as todays steel that it wouldnt have been punctured by the ice.Ill ask her what it was in the steel that made in incapiable of withstanding the icecaps.



posted on Feb, 13 2006 @ 09:29 PM
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Originally posted by mfj649212
hmmm. i think that it was built with steel that had a higher percentage of something. This made it weaker then todays steel, my science teacher told me if the steel was the same as todays steel that it wouldnt have been punctured by the ice.Ill ask her what it was in the steel that made in incapiable of withstanding the icecaps.


It was made of wrought iron not steel, which is a lot less strong then steel or even its counter part cast iron. It was the only thing they could make at the time in big enough pieces to build the ship.

Have any of you heard the story that it wasn't the Titanic that sank, but the Olympic. The story goes that, the Olympic was in a accident which damaged the keel and it was beyond repair, to have scraped the vessel would have bankrupted the company. So to save the business they switched the ship with the Titanic and were planning to scuttle her, for the insurance. But on the way to the decided place, it hit the iceberg and sank.

This was on a TV show over here in the UK a while ago. I will see if i can dig up some links tomorrow as it is too late now.



posted on Feb, 14 2006 @ 10:50 AM
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I'm sure you've also heard of the ferry "ESTONIA"...

www.balticsww.com...



posted on Feb, 14 2006 @ 10:59 AM
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Originally posted by mfj649212
hmmm. i think that it was built with steel that had a higher percentage of something. This made it weaker then todays steel,


your right..the steel that made the Titanic was high in sulphur...which made the steel very brittle in the cold.



posted on Feb, 14 2006 @ 11:36 AM
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There is a so called historian propagaating that the Titanic was not the Titanic, that after the Olympics collison with the HMS Hawke. She was so damaged they decided to do a insurance scam...switch the ships...send Olympic to sea as Titanic..sink her claim the moola.

Here is some links on that theory....

olympic.txc.net.au...

www.euronet.nl...

www.amazon.co.uk...

www.amazon.co.uk...

Tests done on Titanics steal showed it was very brittle in the icy cold waters of the North Atlantic.



posted on Feb, 14 2006 @ 12:01 PM
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You have got to be kidding. It would have been impossible to keep the identity switch of the two ships secret. You had hundreds of people working on and or around both ships, not to mention the people who would have actually carried out the transfer of goods and equipment between the two ships.

The next thing that people will be saying is that Juan Trippe had the Hindenberg sabotaged to keep it from competing with Pan Am's Clipper planes.



posted on Feb, 14 2006 @ 12:08 PM
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The link I have is for the documentary, and to my knowledge that is the only info about the discovery I'm talking about... here it is www.history.com... let mw know if yuo find more on the topic - thanks!



posted on Feb, 14 2006 @ 12:10 PM
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I've heard that it was really a German U-boat that sunk the Titanic and the iceberg story was fabricated to cover it up.

Peace



posted on Feb, 14 2006 @ 01:15 PM
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Titanic's launch day, May 31, 1911.

Gross Tonnage - 46,239 tons
Dimensions - 259.83 x 28.19m (852.5 x 92.5ft)
Number of funnels - 4
Number of masts - 2
Construction - Steel
Propulsion - Triple screw
Engines - Eight-cylindered triple expansion engines and steam turbines
Service speed - 21 knots
Builder - Harland & Wolff, Belfast
Launch date - 31 May 1911
Passenger accommodation - 1,034 1st class, 510 2nd class, 1,022 3rd class

Sunk April 14, 1912.

www.ocean-liners.com...



Olympic, one of Titanic's sister ships was launched, October 20, 1910.

Gross Tonnage - 45,342 tons
Dimensions - 259.83 x 28.19m (852.5 x 92.5ft)
Number of funnels - 4
Number of masts - 2
Construction - Steel
Propulsion - Triple screw
Engines - Combination of eight triple-expansion reciprocating engines and steam turbines.
Service speed - 21 knots
Builder - Harland & Wolff, Belfast
Launch date - 20 October 1910
Passenger accommodation - 735 1st class, 674 2nd class, 1,026 3rd class

Last voyage for the Olympic, 27 March 1935 on the way to the scrapyard.

The Olympic was involved in three separate collisions over the years, one of them hitting and sinking the Nantucket lightship in 1934.

www.ocean-liners.com...




The last of the three sister ships, the Britannic was launched February 26, 1914.
Rumor has it that Britannic's original name was Gigantic, but it's not been proved one way or the other.

Gross Tonnage - 48,158 tons
Dimensions - 259.68 x 28.65m (852 x 94ft)
Number of funnels - 4
Number of masts - 2
Construction - Steel
Propulsion - Triple-screw
Engines - Triple-expansion, eight and steam turbines
Service speed - 21 knots
Builder - Harland & Wolff, Belfast
Launch date - 26 February 1914
Passenger accommodation - 790 1st class, 836 2nd class, 953 3rd class

Sunk November 21, 1916 after hitting a mine.

www.ocean-liners.com...



Aside from the fact that ship building technology of the day outstripped the metallurgical technology available which ended up with the Titanic being built with a high concentration of sulphur in the alloy as was mentioned in the post above.
If I remember right, from reading about this, the ship builders had ordered and paid for an alloy with less sulphur, but got the cheaper stuff instead.

Along with that was that the so-called watertight compartments of the Titanic were open at the top which allowed a full compartment of water to flood over to the next one and so on.
The thinking was, if the ship took on water, it would flood evenly.
Being down by the bow due to a ruptured hull was deemed to be a very small possibility.

Along with that was that the Titanic did abide by the law - at the time - which called for a specific number of lifeboats as per tonnage.
Ten years later, tonnage had doubled, but the law went unchanged.
White Star did add some rafts, but in the end it wasn't enough.

The Britannic suffered much the same fate as the Titanic when it hit a mine and went down by the bow.
Water flooded one compartment after the other and the captain didn't have time to beach the liner before it sunk.

There's an interesting story about a nurse who went through both the Titanic and Britannic sinkings - the Brittanic was a hospital ship at the time - and I believe spent time on the Olympic as well.

Aside from the terrible loss of life and ship, some good did come out of it.
After Titanic sunk, laws were changed in several areas.
Lifeboat capacity for one as well as the requirement to man the radio shack 24/7 any time a ship was at sea.

That last requirement could have saved many lives due to the California being fairly close to the sinking Titanic, but the radio operator had gone to bed.



posted on Feb, 14 2006 @ 02:51 PM
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yeah thats it, there was such a higher amount of sulfur in steel at the time, that it could brittle, and it was easily punctured.

you know what else is pretty cool, i had 3 relatives on the titanic, and the 2 males were supposive bank robbers, pretty crazy huh? the one female survived.



posted on Feb, 14 2006 @ 03:13 PM
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You can view the documentary " Titanic the ship that never sank" at the link below I had to upload it in 3 parts, you can also increase the picture size a bit
by right clicking the video and zoom to 200.

www.putfile.com...



Is this the Titanic or the Olympic?




[edit on 14/2/2006 by Sauron]



posted on Feb, 14 2006 @ 06:53 PM
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i guess that means aliens shot it down



posted on Feb, 14 2006 @ 07:06 PM
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Shortly after Vahall did her interview with Price, I did some research on the subject and found that the recent reports from those that found the titanic heave confirmed beyond a doubt that it was in fact the titanic and not the Olympic.

Apparently they stamped portions of the ships steel in a certain way, therefore this was confirmed as a hoax.

Sorry I do not have the link handy right now, but I will look it up again and post it when I find it.



posted on Feb, 14 2006 @ 07:10 PM
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Wait your saying that the steel did not brittle from the large percentage of sulphur in its composition? im confused. Or are you saying that there is not a definate total of how much steel was used in its protective layers.



posted on Feb, 27 2006 @ 09:16 PM
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The documentary was on last night, and they now have proof that the ship was damaged from the bottom as well as the side. So Titanic would have been able to stay afloat much longer than it did if it was only hit from the side like originally thought. The damage to the bottom caused more than just one of the cells in the lower area to become flooded. We also originally thought that the ship tipped then borke in half form the deck to the bottom.

Since two large segments of the bottom hull broke off it left a huge tear in the bottom going up the ship. As it tipped it actually broke from the bottom up making is sink with much greater force and speed. What should have been 4 hours of evacuation/rescue time was only a little over an hour I think they said.

I can't even remember everything they figured out - you might be able to find out when it will be on next at the website
Did anyone else see it?



posted on Feb, 28 2006 @ 12:04 AM
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The Olympic was in service before Titanic was completed; it was learned that first-class passengers on the promenade would sometimes get wet from the spray caused by the bow. So the forward First Class section of the Promenade deck of the Titanic was enclosed, but the Olympic was not enclosed. This row of windows is the easiest way to quickly discern the ships.





Click here to watch The-Titanic-leaving-the-Thomson-Locks footage from 1912, New York, Halifax, & Carpathia.



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