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Origin of Similar Stories in Different Religions

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posted on Feb, 12 2006 @ 03:21 AM
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Lots of religions have similar stories that repeat over the millenia. Such a one is the Savior God story:

The Savior God is born from Deity and is raised with human parents. There is an early life-threatening childhood trauma from which he survives. The rest of his childhood story is unknown or at best vague. He grows up and starts on his life journey or purpose. He accomplishes it and is killed in the end. He comes back to life and lives with the Gods or as God.

This story is retold in many religions, including the Hindus, ancient Egyptians, American Indians, Greeks (i.e. Hercules), and Christians (Jesus Christ).

Some people say (mainly philosophers and other people with no real jobs) that this story is a necessary part of the human psyche and simply by nature we need it.

I personally feel that there was a knowledge of the Truth since the beginning of the world, and that many groups have branched off and adapted it to their own needs, or merely stole it from the original believers and modified it to how they liked it. After a few thousand years, most of the details have changed, but the central core story remains quite similar.

What is your peronal take on this?




posted on Feb, 12 2006 @ 08:58 AM
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Originally posted by Ralph_The_Wonder_Llama
I personally feel that there was a knowledge of the Truth since the beginning of the world, and that many groups have branched off and adapted it to their own needs...After a few thousand years, most of the details have changed, but the central core story remains quite similar.

What is your peronal take on this?


I agree 100%!

The same could be said of prophecy. I don't have time to look for a link, but Valhall has a thread on that angle in Conspiracy Masters. Check it out, it'll help flesh out your theory, I think.



posted on Feb, 12 2006 @ 09:20 AM
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Lol.

You need to go back much furthur in time. Start at the begining of human history. The shamans/mystics of precivilization is where current religous belief's come from. Shamans see mystical power's and god's in all of nature. One is a rain god, another a volcano god and so on. Sacrifices were done to apease these god's and ensure certain event's happened that the tribal society needed.

Moving on through history as man became more civilized and more creative at story telling, these naturalistic god's took on more human characteristics and forms. The shamans became the hybridization of the god head and man. Able to perform the magical and mystical feat's previously only thought that the god's could do.

Later on, as we became even more civilized and learned even more of our world, these god's changed. The main god head becoming the one true god and his children becoming the angels. The same elements still exist for the hybridization of god/man also. Now it's those chosen by god to do these feat's rather then the god's having human desire's and mating with humans.

The reason there's 'appears' to be an element of truth is through this evolution. All religious beliefs have a common ancestor, so of course it looks like there's an element of truth. Which bring's us to why did man invent religion. Well, why did man invent science? To explain our world. Early man didn't have the technology nor knowledge of our world as we do today. They didn't know how lightening was formed or why it rained, or why the sun went down and came up the next day but they knew it had to have a cause. Thus was born religion and the belief in gods.



posted on Feb, 12 2006 @ 11:42 AM
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Heavily related to this are the works of Immanuel Velikovsky. If you're not familiar with him, he investigated the same phenomenon: myths and legends that evolved similarly within cultures that had no contact, His hypothesis is that they all harken from events that occurred very early in man's history and have evolved into these various stories over time.



posted on Feb, 12 2006 @ 11:52 AM
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This is exactly how the dragon myth occured. I've already tried explaining that to the reptilian follower's though.



posted on Feb, 12 2006 @ 01:13 PM
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Every human being has sought a higher power. But we dont know the influances of other religions had in creating others, thus the origins of such stories are rather muddled to come with a clear conslusion.

If we compare Eastern religions and European religions, we can get a bigger contrast. Mostly religions are around to explain about this we do not know about, and that is the after life, or the life before we were born.



posted on Feb, 12 2006 @ 02:06 PM
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Every human being has sought a higher power. But we dont know the influances of other religions had in creating others, thus the origins of such stories are rather muddled to come with a clear conslusion.


True, in a way. But not that difficult. I don't know much about eastern religion history, but assuming it was shamanistic or something similar, it could have easily evolved seperatly without influence or influencing european religion. Just as none had contact with native american religion, yet even native american religion has similar aspect's of all religion's as well, but they also didn't originate in the americas either, so thus carried they're ancestral religion over to their new homeland and from there followed a seperate evolutionary path. All in all however, there does strongly appear to be a common ancester for nearly all religous belief's.

But granted it's hard to find conclusive proof, just as one cult won't admit it's teaching's are from another cult. As monotheism won't admit to it's stories being from pagan and polytheism belief's. So of course, over time each new succesive religion won't lay such 'borrowed' claim as it hurt's the foundation of it's belief's.



posted on Feb, 12 2006 @ 02:43 PM
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Christians believe in the story of Noah and the Ark, where the world's population was wiped out by a flood.

Native Americans tell that their great ancestors built a great tower to escape further floods by the Gods. The Greeks believe in a flood story as well. Most religions do.

Was there really a Great Flood that wiped out most of mankind?



posted on Feb, 12 2006 @ 03:37 PM
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There is no evidence of a world wide flood. Not even the melting ice caps of the last ice age caused a world wide flood. It's possible that these stories talk of a localized flood. Although I've never heard of the indians talking about a flood myth before.

but perhaps, overtime pre written language, these flood myths just got blown out of proportion. Flood's do happen all over the world, so it's not that hard to imagine a flood myth being created.

[edit on 12-2-2006 by Produkt]



posted on Feb, 12 2006 @ 07:11 PM
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I think it's possible that, sometime back in the dawn of human history, somebody formed the first religion, and many of these common stories may come from that. I don't have any evidence for that theory, except that it's the only one I've ever been able to come up with that actually makes some sense.

In regards to the Noah's ark flood, there is no geological evidence of a worldwide flood, but I've read that there is some evidence that a massive flood occurred in the mideast, and that this massive flood was the one behind the stories. That doesn't explain the Native American or Greek stories, though, but I suppose that most cultures that lived near water would have seen floods, and probably had nightmares about massive floods that wiped out everything. Heck, even now, we're afraid of floods; imagine what people 5000 years ago would have thought if Hurricane Katrina came knocking at their doorsteps... they probably would have ascribed some sort of divine meaning to it.



posted on Feb, 12 2006 @ 11:20 PM
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Originally posted by DragonsDemesne
In regards to the Noah's ark flood, there is no geological evidence of a worldwide flood, but I've read that there is some evidence that a massive flood occurred in the mideast, and that this massive flood was the one behind the stories. That doesn't explain the Native American or Greek stories, though...


I've read the same thing. I think there was a flood in the Middle East, and I also think this is the same 'Great Flood' that all the stories refer to.

Considering the mitochondrial DNA- based 'out of Africa' theory, my guess is that the Flood happened to those few people who had migrated from Africa, toward the Middle East. The people who experienced the Flood, or their descendants, eventually either decided to stay in the Middle East, or to move along. I think the people who kept migrating took the story with them, and that's how it filtered all over the world.



posted on Feb, 13 2006 @ 12:54 AM
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en.wikipedia.org...

It is not unusual that such peoples would have deep memories of floods and have developed mythologies surrounding floods to explain and cope with an integral part of their lives. To these ancient cultures, a flood that covered their known world would likely be considered local flooding by First World standards instead of literally the entire planet. Scholars point out that most cultures living in areas where flooding was less likely to occur did not have flood myths of their own. These observations, coupled with the human tendency to make stories more dramatic than events originally warranted, are all the points most mythology scholars feel is necessary to explain how myths of world-destroying cataclysmatic floods evolved.



posted on Feb, 13 2006 @ 12:58 PM
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I think some of it can be chalked down to Solar and astrological mythology.

One can draw parallels between the different deities and God-men of various religions, and see how their adventures can be concluded as astrological allegories - Jesus for example as the Son/Sun of God.



posted on Feb, 13 2006 @ 01:15 PM
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The same stories can be found in different cultures because of archetypes.

Archetypes are a common set of beliefs hardwired into the brain through the natural course of human culture.

For instance, stories containing a hero are found everywhere. The hero is an example of an archetype.

Archetypes are what humans believe to be ideal examples of human beings.

wiki



posted on Feb, 14 2006 @ 03:20 AM
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Originally posted by Produkt
There is no evidence of a world wide flood. It's possible that these stories talk of a localized flood. Although I've never heard of the indians talking about a flood myth before.
[edit on 12-2-2006 by Produkt]

Well they did. In North America, over 60 First Nations have flood stories. If thats not enough, check out Central and South American ones. I'm surprised you missed so many flood stories. How much have you looked into it, Produkt?

www.talkorigins.org...

www.knowledge.co.uk...



posted on Feb, 14 2006 @ 05:52 AM
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Oh cool, didn't realize some indian tribe's had a flood myth. Unfortunatly, not all do.



en.wikipedia.org...

It is not unusual that such peoples would have deep memories of floods and have developed mythologies surrounding floods to explain and cope with an integral part of their lives. To these ancient cultures, a flood that covered their known world would likely be considered local flooding by First World standards instead of literally the entire planet. Scholars point out that most cultures living in areas where flooding was less likely to occur did not have flood myths of their own. These observations, coupled with the human tendency to make stories more dramatic than events originally warranted, are all the points most mythology scholars feel is necessary to explain how myths of world-destroying cataclysmatic floods evolved.


Common misconception that the flood myth is a world wide phenomenom. Well, in a way it is, but only for those people who deal with flood's.



posted on Feb, 14 2006 @ 07:04 AM
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It is no surprise that there are many who have no flood story. But the 300 plus that do are a phenomenon worth checking out. In the list of First Nations from my first post are a number of peoples who live in regions unlikely to have had a major flood. Since all people need water, necessitating their settlements being close to a water source, floods are possible for any people. That said, I feel that there is more to it.
Did you read the second link? I read the book, and Allen and Delair gather copious evidence to support a global extinction level event around 9 500 BC. They list their evidence, and the results of C14 dating, and compare their findings with what the various flood stories say. In many cases, the stories fit the evidence. It makes more sense to me than the currently accepted 'ice age' theory. Mammoths, sabretooth tigers, giant sloths, etc. all met their final end then. I highly recommend that book, it opened my eyes.



posted on Feb, 14 2006 @ 07:15 AM
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Eh? People migrate from one region to the next. Native american tribe's migrated with the buffalo. It's extremly probable that those tribes recounting a flood myth to the white man migrated with the herds they relied upon for food. Doesn't take a total moron to realize that. Same applies to the rest of the world. People migrated with their sources of food or for territory reason's. Culture's that stuck with one spot expanded their territories. BUT, those who never lived near a source of flooding water never did come up with a flood myth. The ice age isn't some fantasy, it really did happen. There's ample evidence for it. I've yet to see any evidence for a global flood causing a worldwide exinction. fresh and salt water fish, plant's, alot of animals we see today ... many other thing's would not exist today if there was a world wide flood. The noahs ark mythology is a young earth creationist story, possibly stemmed from a real flood in the biblical area, as per evidence does suggest.



posted on Feb, 14 2006 @ 01:30 PM
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I can't argue with that. I must be mistaken. No worries. You may consider this done. Just curious though, did you read Allen and Delairs book?



posted on Feb, 15 2006 @ 08:05 AM
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No, I haven't read nor heard of those people before. I try my best to stay away from the misunderstanding's of ignorant young earth creationist's or similar like minded folk who think there's proof of this nonsense. In another thread someone said some junk about sand stone being evidence for a world wide flood ... obviously ignorant of what sand stone is. These are the kind of people today's world has to deal with. Children




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