The Immortal Ones: Is Telomere reconstruction the answer?

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posted on Feb, 10 2006 @ 12:46 PM
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Since my earliest years of childhood, I've heard rumors about these guys. They are "The Immortal Ones." Apparently, these are three Nephites made Immortal by God, through Jesus, until the day of The Second Coming. It may just be a Mormon tale. Frankly, even with the Internet, I'm having truouble finding REAL information on this stuff. Anything you good people can find on The Immortal Ones, and post it here, will be appreciated!

ANYWAYS...

At the Mormon website I visited recently, they briefly turn the discussion to something called Telomeres. I searched for telomeres and found this site.

websites.afar.org...

I'm no Biochemist, but this sounds like the one TRUE course of study, to ultimately finding the Key To Immortality.

What do you think?




posted on Feb, 10 2006 @ 03:07 PM
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This has been discussed before in this forum. The main reason telomere research alone will not extend lives is because even though you can cease apoptosis by extending telomeres, you will not stop cell division. This would create cysts and masses of unneccessary cells as a result of dieing cells not dieing and being replaced.

~MFP



posted on Feb, 11 2006 @ 12:07 AM
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Thanks, doc!

It's about time I got a pro to chime in on some of my whacky posts!



posted on Feb, 11 2006 @ 06:05 AM
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hehe, no problem. And to be fair, I'm a third year medical student, not quite a doc. Your idea isn't wacky, either. It was good! You wouldn't believe how much research is being done on telomeres and cell life extension.

~MFP



posted on Feb, 11 2006 @ 07:37 AM
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I've got big hopes for telomerase (sp?) inhibitors.


But I've never heard of these Mormon immortals before. Are they like a re-invention of the grail knights? The templar-types tasked with protecting the resting place of the grail?

Or did I just watch Indiana Jones 3?


Seriously though, this is a fascinating prospect on the horizon. Concquering the hayflick limit would go a long way to achieving defacto immortality. You'd probably need regular surgeries and transplants to repair damage and out of control cysts (as mentioned by bsl4doc).


[edit on 11-2-2006 by WyrdeOne]



posted on Feb, 11 2006 @ 08:18 AM
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Originally posted by bsl4doc
This has been discussed before in this forum. The main reason telomere research alone will not extend lives is because even though you can cease apoptosis by extending telomeres, you will not stop cell division. This would create cysts and masses of unneccessary cells as a result of dieing cells not dieing and being replaced.

~MFP


My husband, a biologist, worked with Liz Blackburn 3 years ago on her telomere life extension project. The results you describe was expected, but the in vitro experiments proved otherwise. The tissue cultures were immortalized; no runaway growths occurred. Amazing, huh?

-Forestlady



posted on Feb, 11 2006 @ 08:27 AM
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My husband, a biologist, worked with Liz Blackburn 3 years ago on her telomere life extension project. The results you describe was expected, but the in vitro experiments proved otherwise. The tissue cultures were immortalized; no runaway growths occurred. Amazing, huh?


There's a big difference between lab test results and actual biologica results. You should know that, and I'm positive your husband does. In my medical school (University of Firenze), we can easily create genomically identical stem cells lines from enucleated egg cells and a donor's skin cells. In lab tests, it would seem we can transplant these with relative ease because they are identical ot the donors somatic cells. However, real biological tests prove otherwise. In short, don't put the cart before the horse, no?

I think there is definitely promise in this field, we're just not anywhere near a full, applicable test yet.

~MFP



posted on Feb, 11 2006 @ 12:46 PM
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Yes we both know that. I was just commenting on the lab results to add to the pool of information.

-Forestlady



posted on Feb, 12 2006 @ 02:51 PM
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Originally posted by WyrdeOne
But I've never heard of these Mormon immortals before. Are they like a re-invention of the grail knights? The templar-types tasked with protecting the resting place of the grail?
[edit on 11-2-2006 by WyrdeOne]


There's really not much to it scripturally. In the Book of Mormon, Jesus Christ visits the Americas after his Resurrection and shows himself to the people there. He appoints twelve men to be his leaders, and asks them the wishes of their hearts. Nine of the twelve say they want a spot in heaven when they die if they are good. Three ask to remain on the Earth to teach the gospel until Christ returns.

There are no other stories about them in any Mormon scriptures. There are "campfire stories" circulating through the Mormon Church about how "three nice men helped me find my car keys" or "three nice men helped me change a flat tire, and I stood up to thank them.... they were gone!"

But no offical Church teachings exist other than the short blurb earlier.

[edit on 12-2-2006 by Ralph_The_Wonder_Llama]



posted on Jan, 12 2008 @ 12:41 PM
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Originally posted by Toelint
Since my earliest years of childhood, I've heard rumors about these guys. They are "The Immortal Ones." Apparently, these are three Nephites made Immortal by God, through Jesus, until the day of The Second Coming. It may just be a Mormon tale. Frankly, even with the Internet, I'm having truouble finding REAL information on this stuff. Anything you good people can find on The Immortal Ones, and post it here, will be appreciated!

ANYWAYS...

At the Mormon website I visited recently, they briefly turn the discussion to something called Telomeres. I searched for telomeres and found this site.

websites.afar.org...

I'm no Biochemist, but this sounds like the one TRUE course of study, to ultimately finding the Key To Immortality.

What do you think?


I took a different approach to finding the secret of immortality.

After hearing the audio tape "Dead Doctors Dont Lie" I said to myself, why not find out the oldest living person among us and find what they are doing to survive. After a long and extensive search, I found a gentleman whom I fully believe is nearly 2,800 years old.

I am writing down as much as I can about my experiences with this man as I have time. Check here for more details.

If I ever get the chance, I will try to get a DNA sample from this immortal to test for things like the telmores.



posted on Jan, 12 2008 @ 12:51 PM
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Telomerase research is more likely to yield cancer results than immortality results.

Our cells divide a certain number of times because of telomerase breakdown. The only examples we really find that are exclusions to this are cancerous.

Think of it as a mechanism of a more fundamental force. That fundamental force is what we need to identify and interact with, i think.



posted on Jan, 12 2008 @ 02:25 PM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 




Our cells divide a certain number of times because of telomerase breakdown. The only examples we really find that are exclusions to this are cancerous.


I think you're wrong about that. There are exactly two exceptions that I know of, one is, as you mentioned, cancer cells. The other is stem cells.

If I'm not mistaken, stem cells work in almost exactly the same was as cancer cells, the only difference is that the growth of the stem cells is ordered and follows a genetic 'blueprint' in order to build organs and tissues and whatnot.

That's my understanding anyway, but I could be wrong.

It wouldn't surprise me at all if cancer was actually the fountain of youth. If you could manage to direct the growth of the cancer, and force it to grow in a certain way, at a certain speed, and stop when you wanted it to stop, we'd have a very viable tool for combating the organ/tissue failure that comes with old age and disease.



posted on Jan, 12 2008 @ 09:28 PM
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Originally posted by WyrdeOne
It wouldn't surprise me at all if cancer was actually the fountain of youth. If you could manage to direct the growth of the cancer, and force it to grow in a certain way, at a certain speed, and stop when you wanted it to stop, we'd have a very viable tool for combating the organ/tissue failure that comes with old age and disease.


I think that our current life span has more to do with the radiation in the part of the galaxy/universe we are currently located in. Ifour planet were not as good at filtering the radiation, we likely would live even shorter.





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