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All you Brits and Aussies crack me up with your words and phrases!

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posted on Feb, 9 2006 @ 09:37 AM
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Originally posted by Oni x x
ryayt hisayt utayo


What does it mean?

Have you guys ever been to Lower Uncton in London, home of Al Bundy's ancestors?
That's probably how they speak there.

Peace




posted on Feb, 9 2006 @ 09:41 AM
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I don't like the way americans say "Aluminium" or "Router"

I'm just outside london but i speak with a strong cokney accent, I don't like the way I speak but you can't help how you're brought up. But when i was in the states the women loved it for some reason???

Also whoever said they was in Felixstowe before, your right it is a nice place, I've been to the port a few times on business.



posted on Feb, 9 2006 @ 09:50 AM
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Originally posted by DodgeG1
I don't like the way americans say "Aluminium" or "Router"


As far as "aluminum" goes, we say it different because we spell it different. The word "router" is pronounced both ways in the states. It's one of those "you say toe-may-toe I say toe-mah-toe" things. In the country of Texas we say "row-ter".

Peace



posted on Feb, 9 2006 @ 10:22 AM
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I just cant understand why the Brits and Aussies just cant speak English like everyone else



posted on Feb, 9 2006 @ 10:33 AM
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Dr. Love. it said "try this out".

Lol Amuk it has been in the British history for years so who are we to change it.

Cockney and Backslang language is fading fast, it is kind of sad because our elders spoke it and new slang is taking over! :shk:

oni x x



posted on Feb, 9 2006 @ 10:38 AM
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Originally posted by Oni x x
Lol Amuk it has been in the British history for years so who are we to change it.


LOL....it was a joke, we had a guy from the UK move here (Arkansas) and we could barely understand a word he said.



posted on Feb, 9 2006 @ 10:41 AM
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Oh i know it was a joke thats why i did the little clown dance.

oni x x



posted on Feb, 9 2006 @ 10:43 AM
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Originally posted by Amuk
LOL....it was a joke, we had a guy from the UK move here (Arkansas) and we could barely understand a word he said.


I'm from the States and I have a hard time understanding some people from Ar-Kansas... Imagine how the brit felt.



posted on Feb, 9 2006 @ 11:00 AM
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Regarding Aluminium/Aluminun. Not many people know this but (*choke*) the American way is technically correct.

When first isolated in 1808, Humphrey Davy called it 'Alumium' but he later changed his mind and inserted the 'n' to give us 'Aluminum'.

America adopted this form immediately but British institutions complained that it disrupted the pattern established bt such as sodium, calcium, strontium etc and added an extra vowel to creat 'Aluminium' as used in Britain to this day.



posted on Feb, 9 2006 @ 11:01 AM
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Slight detour here but you guys reminded me of a situation that almost made me die of laughter.

One day my boss was out of the office. Anyways, some Japanese client of ours calls me asking if my boss is around. I tell him he's out but knowing it's probably important I get my boss on a three-way conference call. My boss is an Okie. Kind of a hick but a good guy.

So this Japanese guy starts talking for at least five minutes straight. I was listening to the conversation and I KNEW that my boss wasn't understanding one single word this guy was saying. I had to put my speakerphone on mute because I was doubled-over with laughter and crying. Anyways after this Japanese guy stops talking I heard my boss take the phone away from his mouth and he said to someone that was with him "this guy just talked for an hour and I didn't understand one word he said!".

Oh man........I was in the fetal position and was having a hard time breathing because I was laughing so hard. My boss is asking me to get back on the line but I couldn't.
Finally I just disconnected the poor Japanese guy because he was just mumbling waiting for a response that was never going to come.

He called back eventually and my boss had to lead the conversation and basically just get a "yes" or "no" from the guy so he could understand him.

Peace


[edit on 9-2-2006 by Dr Love]



posted on Feb, 9 2006 @ 11:03 AM
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I think I've got this right. In the uk , pants are what you wear underneath your trousers , but in the US pants are trousers. Thats always seemed odd to me, and on the same note, in the UK, trousers are worn over the bum or buttocks, but in the US, a bum can be what I would refer to as a tramp or vagrant in the uk.
You have fanny packs in the us, which seems a bit rude to us brits!
Your car parts are quite different to ours
fender=bumper
hood=bonnet
trunk=boot
Windshield=windscreen
tire=tyre

there are a few others here
www.geocities.com...
but I'm not sure that I totally agree with all of them as I use many of the words that are listed as American.



posted on Feb, 9 2006 @ 11:06 AM
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who, from outside Britain/Yorkshire would understand me if I said the following;

"Has tha seen his car? Its manky inside and its conked out!"

"make sure you stay on the causey."

"Its laiking room for bairns"

Any takers?



posted on Feb, 9 2006 @ 11:23 AM
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Originally posted by LostSailor
I'm from the States and I have a hard time understanding some people from Ar-Kansas... Imagine how the brit felt.


You must be from the Nawtehn states (northern to you yankees)

Its pronounced Ark-an-saw, its against the law here to prounounce it the other way.....really.



posted on Feb, 9 2006 @ 01:35 PM
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And I useed to think 'Arkensaw' was a different place whenever it was mentioned on TV


Whats that other place, where Cessna's come from? The first time I saw it written down I didn't recognise the name of that either, now who talks funny?



posted on Feb, 9 2006 @ 01:39 PM
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You ought to try Indiana. Parts of the state are as culturally southern as anything south of the Mason-Dixon line. We can't even decide what time zone to be in.

You're as likely to hear perfectly articulated English as someone saying, "If I'd a knowed it was you, I'd a retched out the winder and woven at ya". And sometimes at the same dinner table.



posted on Feb, 9 2006 @ 01:53 PM
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Originally posted by Amuk

Its pronounced Ark-an-saw, its against the law here to prounounce it the other way.....really.


I know my man... Just playin' with ya. Gotta love that law...



posted on Feb, 9 2006 @ 02:07 PM
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Where are all the Aussies? You guys have some great words and phrases too.

Peace



posted on Feb, 9 2006 @ 04:32 PM
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Originally posted by waynos"Has tha seen his car? Its manky inside and its conked out!"


I'm from Birmingham in the UK, I'll take you on


"Has anyone seen this car? It's dirty inside and it's broken down!"




posted on Feb, 9 2006 @ 04:55 PM
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Originally posted by LostSailor

I know my man... Just playin' with ya. Gotta love that law...


I know, it just seemed like a good time to let everyone know that its a law on the books here that you pronounce it Arkansaw.........

We have deathcamps full of yankees that didnt get it right



posted on Feb, 9 2006 @ 05:16 PM
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Dont have that problem up here. The only obvious thing is we dont say "Dover", its Dovah, and Havahd,

We book it in the cah through Bostan to the cape before getting caught by a smokey.



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