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B2 Bomber and Anti-Gravity

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posted on Feb, 4 2006 @ 05:25 PM
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That is correct about previous flying wings like the B-49, AW.52 etc but modern fly by wire systems can quite easily make a pure flat flying wing perfectly controllable, you wouldn't need anything else. The most reasonable explanation I have yet heard is where a highly charged leading edge may reduce boundary layer thickness and reduce drag. This makes sense on so many different levels, including the use of lower power settings to achieve a given performance.

I understand the difference in what you say about electrograviyic versus anti gravity but I do not think it would be necessary for the stability issue, just my guess though.

It is however perfectly clear that 'anti gravity' as such has no place in a vehicle like the B-2 where aerodynamics and advanced electronic control systems take care of lift and directional control. Drag reduction though, I like the sound of that.




posted on Feb, 5 2006 @ 10:34 AM
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Originally posted by BigTrain

Kilcoo, that shockcone forms at high subsonic, it does not indicate transonic and furthermore does not indicate supersonic. What are you trying to say?

Are you suggesting that the electromagnetic layer manipulates the shock cone to such a point as to eliminate the sonic boom by causing laminar flow (Smooth Flow to laymens) over the rear wing?

Train


Transonic flow is not a shockcone eminating from the nose of the aircraft.

Its the acceleration of flow around the aerofoil/wing to such a degree it is supersonic while the aircraft is still travelling at subsonic speeds. The piccie I posted shows transonic effects.

At the back end of the supersonic bubble, there is a sharp pressure gradient (the shockwave above the wing I've been referring to - seen in the piccie). This pressure gradient can cause boundary layer seperation - and thus much higher drag values. I'd guess the electromagnetic system on the B-2 is just keeping the boundary layer attached and energised to minimise drag.


Transonic flow does not involve sonic booms.


[edit on 5-2-2006 by kilcoo316]



 
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