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Africa: the Prison Continent

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posted on Feb, 16 2006 @ 06:02 AM
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Associated Free Press

At least seven people have died of dehydration in Somalia over the past month as severe water shortages from a killer regional drought force many to drink their own urine.

Oxfam International said communities in southern and central Somalia were living in searing 40-degree centigrade (104-Fahrenheit) heat with only three glasses a day per person for drinking, washing and cooking.

"The situation is as bad as I can remember," said Abdullahi Maalim Hussein on Thursday, a Somali elder who accompanied a recent Oxfam assessment mission to the worst-hit areas.

"Some people are dying and children are drinking their own urine because there is simply no water available for them to drink," he said in a statement released in Nairobi by the British-based group.

The tiny amount of water available, for which many families have to walk up to 70 kilometers (44 miles) to get, is one-twentieth of the daily supply recommended by minimum humanitarian standards, Oxfam said.

"The situation will get worse unless swift action is taken," said Mohamed Elmi, Oxfam's regional program manager. "People cannot survive on just three glasses of water a day when the temperature is hitting 40 degrees."


BBC - Somalis die of thirst in drought

People in southern Somalia are starting to die from thirst in the worst drought in over 40 years in some parts of the country, says aid agency Oxfam.

Oxfam says assessment teams found seven people who died of dehydration, and that tens of thousands are now at risk.

Yet Another Story and another Sign of Extreme Conditions and the Extreme Siutation that the People of Africa are Facing. Not only the have to Eat Dog Food - they have to Drink their own Urine also.

Sad, really Sad...




posted on Feb, 16 2006 @ 08:04 AM
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Originally posted by Souljah
1) Number of American and other Soldiers standing on the Frontline and saying - NAY! THOU SHALT NOT KILL YOUR BRETHERIN, FOR THE NOBLE KNIGHTS OF JUSTICE HAVE ARRIVED!

2) So, WHY are just the Africans the ONES who HAVE TO FREE THEMSELVES?


1) Careful buddy, I really don't like what you're implying here. As a former "knight" I resent the remark that we are being hypocritical, we follow orders and if those orders contradict the UCMJ or LOAC we cry foul, plain and simple. We don't want to be the worlds police but we have a responsibility to make sure that problems elsewhere do not end up on our shores.

2) We have tried for a LONG time to do the right thing in Africa. If a country doesn't respond that is NOT the fault of the US. We have Peace Corp all over the world, we have Doctors without borders (loaded with US docs), we have MANY charities helping Africa, where do you get off saying that we don't care about "Africans because of color"? You do realise that there are white Africans when you make broad generalizations right? You have yet again shown a bias against the west and in particular the US as being all that is wrong in the world. Maybe you need to do more digging and see all the good we do too and report back on that. You remind me of the media, trying to get attention to your channel (in your case your bias) and report all the bad stuff. People are upset with you because this is all you do here. Try and report on something positive for a change and garner some support that you aren't just a radical left wing flunky. Just my piece of advice, take it or leave it.



posted on Feb, 16 2006 @ 09:12 AM
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Originally posted by Souljah
Yet Another Story and another Sign of Extreme Conditions and the Extreme Siutation that the People of Africa are Facing. Not only the have to Eat Dog Food - they have to Drink their own Urine also.

Sad, really Sad...


Ya know what else is sad?
The US tried to help the Somalis but they were dragged through the streets by those ingrateful bastards.

If that's how they treat people who come to help them then they don't deserve help. Let the *edit* starve.

[edit on 16-2-2006 by sanctum]



posted on Feb, 16 2006 @ 09:26 AM
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Originally posted by AceOfBase
Ya know what else is sad?
The US tried to help the Somalis but they were dragged through the streets by those ingrateful bastards.

I guess that Dragging Through Streets did not Stop the US Marine Core to Level the City of Fallujah with Ground? I guess that Several Thousads dead US Soldiers did not stop the US not to continue the Vietnam Campaign? But when it comes to Africa, everybody mentiones the Mogadishu Incident, and thats the end. So, where the Trick Ace? How come that after 2200+ US soldiers DEAD the US Forces are Bulding Half a Billion Dollars worth Super-Embassy-Bunker-Comples in the middle of Baghdad? Why aren't the US troops leaveing the Ungrateful Iraqi Bastards to slaughter themselves among each other?



If that's how they treat people who come to help them then they don't deserve help. Let the *edit* starve.

What an Ignorant Answer.

I wonder if you will get Warned for using Curse Words.

Anyway, these are little Children, that have nothing to drink.

And be careful what you wish upon others Ace - it just might come back to you, in a Quadripple Ammount!



[edit on 16/2/06 by Souljah]

[edit on 16-2-2006 by sanctum]

[edit on 16-2-2006 by sanctum]



posted on Feb, 16 2006 @ 09:31 AM
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Please post on topic namely "Africa: the Prison Continent".



posted on Feb, 16 2006 @ 09:44 AM
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Souljah:

I guess that Dragging Through Streets did not Stop the US Marine Core to Level the City of Fallujah with Ground? I guess that Several Thousads dead US Soldiers did not stop the US not to continue the Vietnam Campaign? But when it comes to Africa, everybody mentiones the Mogadishu Incident, and thats the end. So, where the Trick Ace? How come that after 2200+ US soldiers DEAD the US Forces are Bulding Half a Billion Dollars worth Super-Embassy-Bunker-Comples in the middle of Baghdad? Why aren't the US troops leaveing the Ungrateful Iraqi Bastards to slaughter themselves among each other?


They left Somalia because it was a different President then.
The troops were deployed by George HW Bush but the Mogadishu incident happened under Clinton. Bill Clinton rightfully decided that if they didn't want US help then they shouldn't get US help.

It was also that incident that made Clinton wary of sending troops into Rwanda. They didn't wat a repeat of the Black Hawk situation.

[edit on 16-2-2006 by AceOfBase]



posted on Feb, 16 2006 @ 11:35 AM
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Our position however is that the Palestinians have a real grivevance: their homwland for over a thousand years was taken, without their consent and mostly by force, during the creation of the state of Israel. And all subsequent crimes - on both sides - inevitably follow from this origional injustice.

What happened was that the Zionist movement, from the begninning looked forward to a practically complete disposession of the indigenous Arab population so that Israel could be a wholly Jewish state, or as much as possible.

The Arab community, as it became incresingly aware of the Zionist intentions, strenuously opposed further Jewish immigration and land buying because it posed a real and imminent danger to the very exsistance of Arab society in Palestine. Because of this opposition, the entire Zionist project never could have been realized without the military backing of the British.

Palestine has been Arabic since the seventh century AD.

In short, Zionism was based on a faulty, colonialist world veiw that the rights of the indigenous inhabitants didn't matter. The Arabs opposition to Zionism wasn't based on Anti-Semitism but rather on a totally reasonable fear of the disposession of their people.

One further point; being jewish ourselves the position we present here is critical of Zionism but is in no way anti-semitic


www.cactus48.com...

The English involvement in India is down to the East India Company again brokering the deal between one and the other after colonial rule.


The borders that Europe drew up were poor at best, drawn along landmarks, not tribal regions. But, see, the strange thing is, instead of the continent re-arranging itself, the fights simply continue without any progress being made.


Again you forget foriegn intrest,



The Zulu tribe is a nation formed when the tribes were scattered during slavery. Don't you think that the continent would have rearranged itself already if it wasn't for the privitization;


Imperialism

Meaning the practice, the theory and the attitudes of a dominating metropolitan center that rules a distant territory.

Colonialism*

Which is almost always a consequence of imperialism, is the implanting of settlements on distant territory. As the historian Michael Doyle puts it;

Empire

Is a relationship, formal or informal, in which one state controls the effective political sovereignty of another political society. It can be achieved by force, by political collaboration, economic, social or cultural dependence. Imperialism is simply the process or policy of establishing or maintaining an empire


*South Africa. Zimbabwe.


Careful buddy, I really don't like what you're implying here. As a former "knight" I resent the remark


Yet I get tagged when I resent remarks on here as an Afro-Carribean.


We have tried for a LONG time to do the right thing in Africa. If a country doesn't respond that is NOT the fault of the US. We have Peace Corp all over the world, we have Doctors without borders (loaded with US docs), we have MANY charities helping Africa, where do you get off saying that we don't care about "Africans because of color"?


You need to look at the facts, there is a double tonged policy attached to the 3rd world. ''Certain'' nations give with one hand and take take take with the other. I think that anyone who joins the army should take classes in;

Human rights abuses - Colonial history - along with Geopolitics. So they at least know what/who they're fighting for without being fed some blatant misinterpretation.


Three charities are launching what they say is the world's largest campaign against the global arms trade.

They argue the trade is out of control and that Britain and America have, if anything, relaxed their controls since 11 September as they seek allies in the war on terror. The charities' campaign for much stricter controls follows protests against Europe's largest arms fair, held in London's Docklands last month.

The government says Britain has a good track record on arms sales and will introduce new legislation later this month to control technology transfers and the activities of arms brokers.

THE ARMS TRADE

Key facts and figures from a business worth almost £19bn a year worldwide

In detail

Governments collectively spend more than £442bn ($700bn) on their armed forces every year and official annual arms sales are valued at up to £18.9bn ($30bn).

But Oxfam, Amnesty International and International Action Network on Small Arms (Iansa) claim the proliferation of arms is unacceptable and are launching a hugely ambitious campaign, says BBC defence correspondent Paul Adams.

Stricter controls

At its heart is a call for a legally binding arms trade treaty within three years.

It is not a move to ban the trade, but to adopt far stricter controls, across regions and in local communities.

The charities claim that national arms export controls are riddled with loopholes.

They say: "The easy availability of arms increases the incidence of armed violence, acts as a trigger for conflicts, and prolongs wars once they break out."

'Awash with guns'

Campaigner Richard Stanforth from Oxfam said: "From Birmingham to Bogota the global arms trade is out of control.

"There are more regulations on the music industry than on arms traders."

The village I grew up in Sudan is now completely awash with guns, even children as young as nine carry weapons in Torit.

James Omunson, Oxfam campaigner

Campaign supporter James Omunson said: "The village I grew up in Sudan is now completely awash with guns, even children as young as nine carry weapons in Torit.

"I urge all governments to sign up to an Arms Trade Treaty to control weapons sales in Torit and Birmingham alike."

As part of the campaign, organisers aim to create a "Million Faces" petition.

Instead of signing a petition, organisers are urging supporters to email in a photo or self-portrait of themselves.

These will then be presented to governments in what is hoped will be a statement of mass public antipathy to the arms trade.

'Stifling development'

Government officials say they applaud the campaign's intentions, but argue it is only likely to succeed if all the major players including Britain, the United States and Russia sign up.

On recent showing the Bush administration seems an unlikely supporter, says Paul Adams.

He says the world is awash with arms, with hundreds of millions of weapons scattered around the globe, killing, stifling development, and spreading poverty and disease.

Despite UN programmes, regional codes of conduct and domestic legislation, far too many weapons end up in places where for reasons of embargos or human rights they should not, he adds.

Major weapons manufacturers include US firms Lockheed Martin, Boeing and Raytheon, BAE Systems in the UK and French company Thales.


Seems they're getting tired trying to do their job while the nations where they hold their offices are playing a major part in corupting/colonising and imperializing the countries they're trying to help.


Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe is in New York for the UN Millennium Summit. Last night, he stepped away from the formal festivities of the largest gathering of world leaders in history and headed to Harlem. There at the Mount Olivet Baptist Church, he received thunderous applause from an audience of more than 1,000 people.

In his speech, Mugabe discussed his controversial land reform plan that takes land away from descendants of British colonialists and gives it to impoverished blacks. White farmers, less than a tenth of a percent of the population own a third of the land.

South African poet and former political prisoner Dennis Brutus was born in Zimbabwe. He talks about the current land crisis as well as the other summit that is taking place in New York this week: the People's Summit in the streets.


Bad guy.... Lets bomb him... He can't do that... we're not rasict its only colonialism.... This isn't happening, you cant blame U.S!

Oh please.

The way things have turned out in Zimbabwe has been bad I can say that but isn't it obvious that you can't sit on someone elses land without expecting a little bit of annoyance? Especially when you own a THIRD of the land leaving the inhabitants to suffer and its been passed down as it has in other states in Africa from colonialism INTO colonialism.... Never guess who get the trade deals and is quick to help them out?


Anything that threatens contentment is undesirable to the political majority. It is a political disaster to be really honest about the deeper social, economic and environmental problems that seriously threaten contentment, because people won't vote for the truth if it threatens their contentment - they would rather live in a world of blissful ignorance. So we see an all too obvious process of social and political denial and avoidance. This leads to widespread distrust, disillusionment and apathy. This is agonisingly obvious when we look at the state of national politics in the UK, the USA and most 'western' nations, where the political majority is affluent and comfortable.


freespace.virgin.net...

Heres me being nice again (DE);

On quoting the above, at least there are those on here who read and discuss social and political issues, through that 'contentment', rather than skim the title and not join in. I guess it shows some kind of,

''I want to know but remain impartial''

Rather than a totally stubborn,

''I don't want to know, let me not click that button''

Something I was getting at before DE savaged my post.

*If that won't get the mods off my back I don't know what will.


[edit on 16-2-2006 by Rebel_Lion]



posted on Feb, 16 2006 @ 03:18 PM
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The Zulu were originally a minor clan in what is today Northern KwaZulu-Natal, founded ca. 1709 by Zulu kaNtombhela. At that time, the area was occupied by many small Nguni tribes and clans (also called imzi)...

In October 1837, the Voortrekker leader Piet Retief visited Dingane at his royal kraal, to negotiate a land deal for the voortrekkers. In November, about 1000 Voortrekker wagons began descending the Drakensberg mountains from the Orange Free State into what is now KwaZulu-Natal.


From: en.wikipedia.org...

So, the Zulu were acutally founded one hundred years before contact with Dutch colonialists, much less the english ones who invaded four years later in response to the dutch.

In response to your comments about South Africa, it is the last country on that end of the continent to retain some sort of social order and justice. Its neighbors, not so much. if they need to spend on military hardware to keep militias and other countries from attacking their borders, then spend away.

As for Zimbabwe's land reforms:


Parliament, dominated by Zanu-PF, passed a constitutional amendment, signed into law 12 September 2005, that nationalized Zimbabwe's farmland and deprived landowners of the right to challenge in courts the government's decision to expropriate their land.


from: en.wikipedia.org...

That is not so much giving land back to impoverished blacks as it is giving it to himself. Dread Wikipedia goes on to say that:


Media analysis

The scale of the drop in farm output has produced widespread claims by aid agencies of starvation and famine. However Mugabe's expulsion of the international media has prevented full analysis of the scale of the famine and the resultant deaths. What is not in dispute is that a country once so rich in agricultural produce that it was dubbed the "bread basket" of Southern Africa, is now struggling to feed its own population...

Currently (as of 2006), Zimbabwe suffers from widespread food shortages, an inflation rate of over 600%, and a bitter political struggle turned violent between the ruling ZANU-PF party and the opposition Movement for Democratic Change which has faced imprisonment and torture. Domestic and international critics lay much of the blame for the current chaos at the feet of the land reform program. Many Zimbabwean refugees have fled to South Africa or Mozambique.


Emphasis mine. So, we have Mr. Mugabe torturing and imprisioning his enemies, taking control of all the land, and expelling the free press. If this isn't African mismanagement of Africa, I don't know what is. How anyone can support Mugabe and talk about social justice is well beyond me.

DE



posted on Feb, 17 2006 @ 01:47 AM
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Originally posted by AceOfBase

Originally posted by Souljah
Yet Another Story and another Sign of Extreme Conditions and the Extreme Siutation that the People of Africa are Facing. Not only the have to Eat Dog Food - they have to Drink their own Urine also.

Sad, really Sad...


Ya know what else is sad?
The US tried to help the Somalis but they were dragged through the streets by those ingrateful bastards.

If that's how they treat people who come to help them then they don't deserve help. Let the *edit* starve.

[edit on 16-2-2006 by sanctum]

Actually America's goal was to secure the Somali coastline from piracy.

Clinton changed that goal to a "humanitarian" one and ruined the effort causing the situation that happend...and today that coast line is one of the most pirated in the world.

Go Clinton!



posted on Feb, 17 2006 @ 07:12 AM
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More News from Africa:


News BBC

he severe drought in East Africa has led to fighting over water resources between Somali tribes in Ethiopia.

At least 12 people have died and over 20 have been wounded in clashes in Yamarug village on the Somali border.

Fighting broke out on Wednesday after the drought in the region increased competition for water and pasture.

The clashes were between members of the Marehan and Majereteen factions of the Darod clan. Parts of Somalia are in the grip of the worst dought in 40 years.

Water Shortages are causing not only people to Drink their Own Urine, but also Clashes for the Last and Small Water Resources, left in this Land, forgotten by all.

More Roumors of War from Africa:


Nigeria oil 'total war' warning



A Nigerian militant commander in the oil-rich southern Niger Delta has told the BBC his group is declaring "total war" on all foreign oil interests.

The Movement for the Emancipation of the Niger Delta has given oil companies and their employees until midnight on Friday night to leave the region.

It recently blew up two oil pipelines, held four foreign oil workers hostage and sabotaged two major oilfields.

The group wants greater control of the oil wealth produced on their land.

Nigeria is Africa's leading oil exporter and the fifth-biggest source of US oil imports, but despite its oil wealth, many Nigerians live in abject poverty.

As I have shown in a post about Nigeria a couple of Pages ago, it is pretty much clear, that Oil in Nigeria is NOT under Control of the People of this Land, but is Controlled by Foreign Corporations, such as Mobil, Chevron, Shell, Elf, Agip and others. Why is that?

A series of repressive and corrupt governments in Nigeria have been supported and maintained by western governments and oil corporations, keen on benefitting from the fossil fuels that can be exploited.

What have the Foreign Oil Companies done for Nigeria Lately?

Let's check out Shell, shall we?
  • Shell companies have worsened fighting in the Niger Delta through payments for land use, environmental damage, corruption of company employees and reliance on Nigerian security forces.

  • The action of Shell companies and their staff creates, feeds into, or exacerbates conflict.

  • Voilence in the Niger Delta kills some 1000 people each year, on par with conflicts in Chechnya and Colombia

  • With over 50 years of presence in Nigeria, it is reasonable to say that the Shell companies in Nigeria have become an integral part of the Niger Delta conflict

Could that be the Reason for the Militant Campaign called "The Dark Feburary?"

Major-General Godswill Tamuno, the military leader of the Mend movement, told the BBC's Abdullahi Kaura Abubakar that they had launched their campaign, called "dark February", to ensure that all foreign oil interests left.



posted on Feb, 17 2006 @ 07:42 AM
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Rebel Lion,

You are still neglecting the fact that no one makes the decision to pull the trigger, set off the bomb, or try to wipe out a race. Sure you did make some fine points about the history of these conflicts, and I do agree with them. But to say that its entirely someone elses fault for the wars going on in Africa is a bit naive in my opinion. There is much more to the modern conflicts in Africa and other places around the world, than to the past imperialism. Religious conflicts arise and lead to ethnic cleansing, who decideds to begin those little tirades? Europe, America? I just cant believe that that is the case simply because as individuals, it is ultimately up to those people on whether or not these things happen, history is past, theres nothing you can do to change that, but you can change the future by the decisions you make in the present.



posted on Feb, 17 2006 @ 09:52 AM
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Souljah:

As I have shown in a post about Nigeria a couple of Pages ago, it is pretty much clear, that Oil in Nigeria is NOT under Control of the People of this Land, but is Controlled by Foreign Corporations, such as Mobil, Chevron, Shell, Elf, Agip and others. Why is that?


Perhaps it's under control of the oil companies because it was the oil companies who discovered the oil deposits through advanced exploration techniques and then spent billions to develop the infrastructure to extract and export that oil.

If the Nigerian government or Nigerian people had discovered the oil and invested the money to extract it the oil would be under their control.



posted on Feb, 17 2006 @ 09:56 AM
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Originally posted by Stratrf_Rus
Actually America's goal was to secure the Somali coastline from piracy.

Clinton changed that goal to a "humanitarian" one and ruined the effort causing the situation that happend...and today that coast line is one of the most pirated in the world.

Go Clinton!


Sorry but you can't put this one on Clinton.
It was already a humanitarian mission before Clinton was elected.



UN

FUNCTION: Established to monitor the cease-fire in Mogadishu, the capital of Somalia, and to provide protection and security for United Nations personnel, equipment and supplies at the seaports and airports in Mogadishu and escort deliveries of humanitarian supplies from there to distribution centres in the city and its immediate environs. In August 1992, UNOSOM I's mandate and strength were enlarged to enable it to protect humanitarian convoys and distribution centres throughout Somalia. In December 1992, after the situation in Somalia further deteriorated, the Security Council authorized Member States to form the Unified Task Force (UNITAF) to establish a safe environment for the delivery of humanitarian assistance. UNITAF worked in coordination with UNOSOM I to secure major population centres and ensure that humanitarian assistance was delivered and distributed



posted on Feb, 18 2006 @ 11:50 AM
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Associated Press

Militants launched a wave of attacks across Nigeria's oil-rich southern delta Saturday, blowing up oil installations and seizing nine foreign oil workers, including three Americans, officials said.

A Royal Dutch Shell official said the company was forced to shut down a facility that moves 400,000 barrels of oil a day — 16 percent of the West Africa nation's output.

About 40 militants overpowered military guards and seized the foreigners before dawn from a barge belonging to Willbros, a Houston-based oil services firm that was laying pipeline for Royal Dutch Shell, a Willbros official said. He spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the media.

The militants provided the names of the kidnapped workers — three Americans, two Egyptians, two Thais, one Briton and one Filipino — in an e-mail Saturday to The Associated Press.

The militants say they are fighting for more autonomy, a greater share of oil wealth and compensation for environmental degradation for the impoverished region's estimated 8 million Ijaw people

Well I guess the Operation "The Dark Feburary" has Begun.

So, why are these Militants Fighting the Goverment?


Oil Companies Complicit in Nigerian Abuses

The oil companies can't pretend they don't know what's happening all around them. The Nigerian government obviously has the primary responsibility to stop human rights abuse. But the oil companies are directly benefiting from these crude attempts to suppress dissent, and that means they have a duty to try and stop it.

Could THIS be a Reason?


Drilling & Killing

"It is very clear that Chevron, just like Shell, uses the military to protect its oil activities. They drill and they kill," Nigerian environmental attorney Oronto Douglas told Pacifica.

This Maybe?


Oil For Nothing: Multinational Corporations, Environmental Destruction, Death and Impunity in the Niger Delta

  • Oil corporations in the Niger Delta seriously threaten the livelihood of neighboring local communities. Due to the many forms of oil-generated environmental pollution evident throughout the region, farming and fishing have become impossible or extremely difficult in oil-affected areas, and even drinking water has become scarce. Malnourishment and disease appear common.

  • The presence of multinational oil companies has had additional adverse effects on the local economy and society, including loss of property, price inflation, prostitution, and irresponsible fathering by expatriate oil workers.

  • Organized protest and activism by affected communities regularly meet with military repression, sometimes ending in the loss of life. In some cases military forces have been summoned and assisted by oil companies.

  • Reporting on the situation is extremely difficult, due to the existence of physical and legal constraints to free passage and free circulation of information. Similar constraints discourage grassroots activism.

  • Are things more Clearer, why these Militants are prepared to conduct such Military Operations in Niger Delta?



    posted on Feb, 18 2006 @ 12:15 PM
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    Souljah:

    Are things more Clearer, why these Militants are prepared to conduct such Military Operations in Niger Delta?


    What's going to happen in Nigeria if the militants are successful are removing the foreign oil companies Souljah?

    The Nigerian government gets 80% of it's revenues from oil.
    If you kick out the foreign oil companies there's no way the Nigerians will be able to keep it operating at it's current capacity.

    Look at the billions of dollars per year that need to be spent to maintain oil production:


    www.eia.doe.gov...

    Exploration and Field Development
    In August 2004, NNPC estimated that $7 billion per year will be necessary to fund exploration and development in hopes of reaching its production targets. A new licensing round offering 61 deepwater and inland blocks in the Gulf of Guinea began in March 2005. Qualified bidders are to be announced in July 2005, with the signing of contracts scheduled for August 31, 2005. These deepwater projects may represent the future of Nigerian petroleum extraction as they allow multinational operators to avoid security risks inherent to the unstable Niger Delta. In January 2005, the Nigerian government revoked 24 underdeveloped oil blocks from multinational oil companies due to delays in their development. Although the Nigerian government returned four of 13 blocks confiscated from Royal Dutch/Shell in March 2005, several of the remaining blocks are included in the current licensing round.

    Shell's $2.7 billion, deepwater Bonga field, estimated to hold reserves of 1.2 billion barrels, is due to begin production in mid-2005. In August 2004, Shell announced plans to invest $9 billion in Nigerian oil and natural gas projects over five years, including investments in the NLNG Train Six, the Soku natural gas plant expansion, and the Bonga oil field. In October 2004, NNPC announced that no 2005 quota would be allocated to Shell for oil production in the Bonga field because of uncertainties concerning production.


    The Nigerians can't keep that going without foreigners and if the oil production stops the people of Nigeria will starve.



    posted on Feb, 18 2006 @ 12:35 PM
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    Originally posted by AceOfBase
    The Nigerian government gets 80% of it's revenues from oil.
    If you kick out the foreign oil companies there's no way the Nigerians will be able to keep it operating at it's current capacity.

    Apparently those 80% then Dissapear into thin Air, for Nigeria is a Rich Country in Natural Resoures, and if the People really HAD control over it, they would not Live in such Poverty, Misery and non-stop War.


    Nigeria's Gas Crisis: Suffering in the Midst of Plenty

    The energy deregulation bug appears to have spread all the way from California to Nigeria. The World Bank and its financial partner the International Monetary Fund (IMF), are urging the government to deregulate the fuel prices in Africa's most populous country. Under the planned deregulation, which is part of a wide-ranging privatization program, the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation -- a state monopoly -- would be broken up in order to privatize the marketing of petroleum products.

    Nigeria is the world's sixth largest oil producer, but the country is a classic case of suffering in the midst of plenty. Despite a daily output of more than two million barrels of crude oil, Nigeria faces one of the worst fuel crises in the world because its oil refineries are so deteriorated they can not process the 150,000 barrels needed daily for local consumption. Besides the poor state of the refineries, irregular distribution, hoarding and smuggling of fuel to neighboring countries where it can be sold for higher prices are also responsible for fuel scarcity.

    Human rights activist Odion-Akhaine argues that structural adjustment economic and social stability. "When you destroy the productive base of the country, people lose their jobs, poverty increases and thus tension in the country which could lead to chaos as we have seen in the past." He fears that the military, which ruled the country for 15 years, could exploit such a situation to return to power.

    Meanwhile, foreign oil companies like Shell and Chevron have a long history of intervening in Nigerian affairs. Under the military dictatorship they regularly pressured the government to send troops to quell protests against their operations in the Niger Delta. Meanwhile in November 1999, the new civilian government sent troops into Odi village where youths were accused of killing 12 police. The entire village was burned to the ground and an untold number of civilians killed probably reaching into the hundreds, according to Human Rights Watch. So far, they have not taken a public stand on deregulation.

    Nigeria is more a Military Dictatorship, then a federal republic - and these Military Dictatorship goverments are in Business with the Foreign oil Companies, and ofcourse they give the Money to these same corrupt dictatorships, so the People of Nigeria do not GET TO SEE THAT MONEY.

    As you can see from this Report, Nigeria is the world's sixth largest oil producer, but the country is a classic case of suffering in the midst of plenty! How can that be? Ofcourse the Western Oil Corporations have absolutely Nothing to do with that, right Ace?

    Its too Obvious that this kind of Hostile Enviroment, in which the People of Nigeria actually do not Control or gain from their Vast natural resources, is Tailor made for Foreign Oil Corporations, which always find a new Busienss Partner for their ongoing Exploatation.



    posted on Mar, 9 2006 @ 04:24 PM
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    I have been thinking about this for a while, mainly because i am an almost activist (too young and not imortent to do anything in the world), and people are always making jokes like "Don't throw that away, send it to a third world country! or maybe some starving africains! (ect!)", this makes me think about people sending tons of money to Huricane Katrina and not things like mudlisides earthquakes tsnumi's and people getting killed everyday in wartorn and governmentless countries in africa where children are used as soilders and nobody cares...

    --YOURS TRULY--

    cooldude76



    posted on May, 19 2006 @ 01:14 PM
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    Hey - what is This?


    Washington Post

    More than a decade after U.S. troops withdrew from Somalia following a disastrous military intervention, officials of Somalia's interim government and some U.S. analysts of Africa policy say the United States has returned to the African country, secretly supporting secular warlords who have been waging fierce battles against Islamic groups for control of the capital, Mogadishu.

    The latest clashes, last week and over the weekend, were some of the most violent in Mogadishu since the end of the American intervention in 1994, and left 150 dead and hundreds more wounded. Leaders of the interim government blamed U.S. support of the militias for provoking the clashes.

    Many of the warlords have their own agendas, Somali officials said, and some reportedly fought against the United States in 1993 during street battles that culminated in an attack that downed two U.S. Black Hawk helicopters and left 18 Army Rangers dead.

    "The U.S. government funded the warlords in the recent battle in Mogadishu, there is no doubt about that," government spokesman Abdirahman Dinari told journalists by telephone from Baidoa. "This cooperation . . . only fuels further civil war."

    Fueling ANOTHER Civil War?

    Well how is that possible?

    Basic Empire Tactics - DIVIDE AND RULE work Everywhere.

    And then Some People have the Nerve to blame Africans for this Prison Continent they are sentanced to live in?

    SICK!






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