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Does anyone read books anymore?

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posted on Jan, 30 2006 @ 10:30 PM
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NJE, If you like Watership Down (which is great), you'd probably like Tailchaser's Song by Tad Williams; similar to Watership Down although a bit darker. My wife and I read both Watership and the Narnia Chronicles to our kid when he was seven; he's 20 now and a junior majoring in Civil Engineering, but he still loves to read!




posted on Jan, 30 2006 @ 11:15 PM
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ty for book suggestion... congrats for you that ur Son is jnr mjr civil engineering...you must be proud!!
It really was delightful to see my Son sitting and listening to a story and having that excitement of what was going to happen next. I really believe books help to develop the imagination and I also feel it is character building and quality time...



posted on Nov, 7 2011 @ 08:35 AM
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Massive Collection of Books :

www.4shared.com...=13123021

Hope you enjoy and you can spread the word



posted on Nov, 7 2011 @ 11:18 AM
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Originally posted by Off_The_Street
NJE, If you like Watership Down (which is great), you'd probably like Tailchaser's Song by Tad Williams; similar to Watership Down although a bit darker. My wife and I read both Watership and the Narnia Chronicles to our kid when he was seven; he's 20 now and a junior majoring in Civil Engineering, but he still loves to read!


Good Ghod. I'm replying to my own post (on the same page of the thread, yet) that's six years old! Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose. (And my son is now 26 and a mathematician instead of a civil engineer -- don't ask.)

My first course of study at the university was English lit, and I still read a bit of it, but over the past five years, as I get closer to retirement and have started to go on more trips, I've been reading a lot of archaeology, regional specific geology, and especially what you could call paleo-societal-historical anthropology or some other high-falutin' term. If you like figuring out where we're from and why we're where we are and why we're doing what we're doing, I'd recommend all of these bad boys sitting on my bookshelf:

    *Catastrophe: An Investigation into the Origins of Modern Civilization by David Keys (www.amazon.com...

    *Anythng by Jared Diamond, especially Guns, Germs, and Steel and Collapse. He lets his overly-politically-correct views on society sometimes get in the way, but even though I don't like him all that much, I gotta admit he knows his stuff. www.amazon.com...#/ref=nb _sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=jared+diamond&rh=n%3A283155%2Ck%3Ajared+diamond

    *After the Ice: A Global Human History 20,000-5000 BC by Steven Mithen www.amazon.com...=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1320685921&sr=1-1

    *The Seven Daughters of Eve by Bryan Sykes. One of the first (and still the best) introductions to human history as presented by our old friend Mr. Mitochondrial DNA. www.amazon.com...=nb_sb_ss_i_1_17?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=seven+daughters+of+eve+by+bryan+sykes&sprefix=seven+daughters +o



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