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Does anyone read books anymore?

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posted on Jan, 30 2006 @ 07:18 AM
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well I absolutely love the Russian classics...esp. Crime & Punishment by Fyodor Dosteovsksy...read it prob 4 times!!

Thomas Hardy is another writer I really like..damn depressing though ---> Woodcutter is so frustrating, threw that book down many times!!

anyway, the literature section doesnt seem to get a lot of hits..quite surprised by that..nearly replied to a thread created at start of 2005!

does anyone read anymore??




posted on Jan, 30 2006 @ 07:24 AM
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I read all the time. History, fiction, biography, spiritual, sport etc etc.

Never been in the literature section here. My bad!



posted on Jan, 30 2006 @ 07:41 AM
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Originally posted by NJE777
does anyone read anymore??


Yeah, me. I love George Orwell, and Robert Anton Wilson [his non-fiction more than his fiction]. I'm currently reading Love All The People - Bill Hicks.



posted on Jan, 30 2006 @ 07:49 AM
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I have read 2 books from G Orwell but never heard of R A Wilson....or Hinks..hmm think I am stuck in the classic area

G Orwell is great though...u will find his books 1984 & Animal Farm in the classic section...



posted on Jan, 30 2006 @ 07:53 AM
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Originally posted by NJE777
G Orwell is great though...


I just got done with Down And Out In Paris And London, which is a fantastic read. It illustrates beautifully that the more things change, the more they stay the same.

Bill Hicks is a dead stand up comic, I'm not surprised you haven't heard of him. It's basically a collection of his writings, treatments for TV shows, letters, transcripts of some of his routines, and stuff like that. He was a genius, and I don't use the term lightly.

Here is a website for the book if you are in the least little bit interested.


[edit on 30/1/06 by Implosion]



posted on Jan, 30 2006 @ 08:00 AM
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ty for that...

have u heard/read Ben Elton? His books are twisted.... underlying message with brilliant humour...



posted on Jan, 30 2006 @ 08:02 AM
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Originally posted by NJE777
ty for that...

have u heard/read Ben Elton? His books are twisted.... underlying message with brilliant humour...



Can't stand the guy...



posted on Jan, 30 2006 @ 08:04 AM
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I read a lot of Stephen King and also James Herbit who is a british horror writer. But king is my faverioute.



posted on Jan, 30 2006 @ 08:10 AM
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I made a Thread in the "Literary" section about that Bill Hicks book ages ago. I don't think it even got any replies :shk:

I have read almost every Stephen King book, and he's still my favourite fiction writer, but at the moment I'm addicted to Biographys and old comic books....nothing too taxing



posted on Jan, 30 2006 @ 08:12 AM
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I read stark...thought that was good but Gridlock wasnt much cop....

& I have never read horror/scary books... lol I am the one at the movies with my eyes shut and fingers in my ears asking my friends "is it safe to look?"

too scary for me!



posted on Jan, 30 2006 @ 08:13 AM
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Originally posted by chebob
I made a Thread in the "Literary" section about that Bill Hicks book ages ago. I don't think it even got any replies :shk:


To be completely honest, until I read this post, I didn't even know there was a Literary section.

On Ben Elton: He went from being midly amusing with his anti establishment political rantings to writing lyrics for Andrew Lloyd-Webber musicals. Nuff said.



[edit on 30/1/06 by Implosion]



posted on Jan, 30 2006 @ 10:05 AM
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I have recently discovered Tom Wolfe. First I read "The Bonfire of the Vanities". That was so good that I then read "A Man in Full".....and now I am reading "I am Charlotte Simmons". It also is a terrific read.

The above are novels, but I have also been told that his non-fiction writing is even better. That will be what I tackle next.

Many years ago I read the classics. It may be time to reread again. I remember "Crime and Punishment" in particular.

I also like Steven King. "The Stand" has been a long time favorite and I just reread it. I also liked "It" and "The Green Mile". King is such a great writer that my imagination goes wild and I can't read some of his stuff. "Pet Cemetery" gave me the creeps. His "horrors" are too horrid for me.



posted on Jan, 30 2006 @ 10:36 AM
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I read...

Neal Stephenson
Cory Doctorow
George Orwell
Douglas Adams
Kurt Vonnegut
Tom Clancy
William Gibson
Etc...

Neal Stephenson's Baroque Cycle books are dense. Took me a year to read Quicksilver. But his other stuff is great and enjoyable.



posted on Jan, 30 2006 @ 10:59 AM
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Originally posted by Mahree
I also like Steven King. "The Stand" has been a long time favorite and I just reread it. I also liked "It" and "The Green Mile". King is such a great writer that my imagination goes wild and I can't read some of his stuff. "Pet Cemetery" gave me the creeps. His "horrors" are too horrid for me.


If you like Stephen King, i would suggest reading James Herbitt. He has a book called 'The Fog', not the world famiouse one. It is about a small village in England, that suffers a earthqauke, releasing a unatural fog. This fog makes people go crazy and do horrable things, it is quite a dirsturbing view into human and animal behaviour.

Official Web Page


The Fog
This is James Herbert's most accomplished book, except perhaps for The Dark, which runs along similar lines. The plot follows a fog which makes people kill each other in a kind of sexual frenzy. The fog has settled over Herbert's favourite backdrop of course - London. Hideous violence, stampeding cows, lots of blood; all very graphic. Classic stuff. Read this then read The Dark, which is even worse!

From Here


en.wikipedia.org...

He has also many more scary and disturbing books, such as 'Rats' and 'The Dark'. I would say he is up there with Stephen King as one of the greats.

EDIT: Fixed quote tags

EDIT: Fixed wrong book name
[edit on 30-1-2006 by picklewalsh]

[edit on 30-1-2006 by picklewalsh]



posted on Jan, 30 2006 @ 11:33 AM
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The only thing I remember about "Crime and Punishment" besides Raskolnikov himself and Sofya Semyonovna was that it took that old boy long enough to get himself sent to Siberia.

Some of my favorite stories are a series of romance novels (a trilogy) called Kristin Lavransdatter and a tetralogy called The Master of Hestviken, both by Sigrid Undset. Undset is probably the greatest female author in history; certainly she may be matched by George Eliot but surpassed by no one. At 46 she was one of the youngest authors in history to receive the Nobel Prize.

I also love Chaucer and the Pearl Poet, but they can be pretty rough going if you're not familiar with Middle English (especially Pearl and Gawain and the Green Knight), so you might want to get an interlinear translation.

Recently, I've been reading a lot of history and anthropology, and there are a couple of good books I'd recommend: Jared Diamond's (Guns, Germs, and Steel and Collapse); David Keys' Catastrophe; and almost everything by Victor Davis Hanson, probably the best living military historian.



[edit on 30-1-2006 by Off_The_Street]



posted on Jan, 30 2006 @ 12:27 PM
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Books are great, I don't think enough people on ATS read the though, to busy playing computer games or watching television


I try and read a book a week. Here's a list of books I've read and liked over the last 6 months.

  • Stephen Baxter's books called the Xeelee sequence ( Raft, Timelike Infinity, Flux, Ring and the Vacuum diagrams. There are also others ) - this is big space opera, spanning the evolution of humans rom the near future to 10 million years from now. If you're agoraphobic, these books might be a bit too much for you lol.

  • The Projekt Saucer Tetrology by WA Harbinson
  • The Elegant Universe by Brian Greene and his companion book The Fabric of the Cosmos
  • Carl Sagans' Contact, which is far far better than the movie.
  • Eric L Harry's earlier books are great technothrillers - Arc Light, Protect and Defend and Vortex.
  • The World is Flat by Thomas Freidman is a good read.


I'm actually having trouble thinking of specific books to list coherently. Lately I've been reading a bit of sci-fi something I didn't think I'd get into, but some of it is superb.

Unfortunately I'm not much of a ' classics ' person, they bore me a fair bit. Maybe it was too much forced reading at school, although I didn't mind the Lord of the Rings.

My first book I can remember reading was Tom Clancy's Hunt for Red October when I was 10.



posted on Jan, 30 2006 @ 01:04 PM
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i think it goes without saying, that there probably are less people reading nowadays (books that is). people moreso read on the internet, or watch tv. however, with books such as harry potter being as popular as they are, kids should still be growing up and reading.

i've not read that many books. when i was really young i remember reading 'biff n chip' books, and the 'mr.men' books. although the only ones i've read, ever, are lord of the flies, the dice man, da vinci code, seinlanguage, the 39 steps..and that's probably about it.



posted on Jan, 30 2006 @ 01:35 PM
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If we spend too much of our lives wrapped up in nostalgia then we have less time to be in the present!
I used to love Herman Hesse
I like Bernard Cronwell's works
but presently I am reading Whiteout by Alex Cockburn & Jeffrey St. Claire
I recently read Firewall (Iran Contra) by Lawrence Welsh
also Pretext for War by James Bamford. There is a lot going on in DC these days.



posted on Jan, 30 2006 @ 03:37 PM
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Well on a fluffy note, a couple of months ago I finished reading Watership Down to my Son...we read a chapter a night (sometimes 2 or 3 depending on how exciting the part was) and he was so enthralled by it. lol I even put different voices for the characters...quite funny at times...

We found the video (very old movie) and watched it after we finished the book, he was like 'that's wrong! that didn't happen' and he said the characters in the video were nothing like he had imagined and didn't think much of the movie.




posted on Jan, 30 2006 @ 04:02 PM
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I have a large collection of books. I have about 150 some to read. All different types. There are sci/fi, horror, drama, western, thriller, classics etc. I have to say that I do enjoy the works Twain, Stephen King, Hemingway, Critchon, and Salinger. Those are off the top of my head.

Currently I am reading Gerald's Game, On the Road, and The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy.

I do have to highly recomend the Hyperion seres by Dan Simmons. It is the best sci/fi I have read in a long time.



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