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Iraqi nationalists insurgents turning against Al Qaeda.

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posted on Jan, 23 2006 @ 12:35 PM
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BAGHDAD (Reuters) - Iraqi nationalist rebels in the Sunni Arab city of Ramadi have turned against their former al Qaeda allies after a bomb attack this month killed 80 people, sparking tit-for-tat assassinations.

Residents told Reuters on Monday at least three prominent figures on both sides were among those killed after local insurgent groups formed an alliance against al Qaeda, blaming it for massacring police recruits in Ramadi on January 5.

"There was a meeting right after the bombings," one Ramadi resident familiar with the events said. "Tribal leaders and political figures gathered to form the Anbar Revolutionaries to fight al Qaeda in Anbar and force them to leave the province.

"Since then there has been all-out war between them," said the resident in the capital of the sprawling western desert province of Anbar, speaking anonymously for fear of reprisals.

Local Iraqi officials confirmed residents' accounts of events but declined to comment publicly.


Getting the Sunnis to participate in the new Iraqi govt. to regain some of their power worked! No doubt the tactics used by Al Qaeda in Iraq does not worked as planned and now we are hearing more and more fighting between the Iraqi insurgents and foreign terrorists, back then they had a common enemy which was to fight the American lead coalition in Iraq, but now the Iraqis can't take anymore of the targeting of innocent Iraqis.




posted on Jan, 23 2006 @ 01:09 PM
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I am guessing that the reason the Iraqis of all tribes are trying to get foreign fighters off the Iraqi lands is because they don't want them there while the Iraqis start fighting their own civil war.

Foreign fighters have no loyalties and they fight for a different cause like you pointed out.

While in a civil war the people in the country are fighting for control and the right to rule their country.

So I would no be surprised if the are indeed trying to get rid of Al-qaida fighters in Iraq.



posted on Jan, 23 2006 @ 01:26 PM
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Al-Qaeda fighters are opportunists in Iraq fighting their own war with US forces and Shias regardless of the Iraqis and harm the Iraqi Nationalist insurgency by blowing up Shia mosques and civillians.

If anything, kicking Al-Qaeda out may make the Iraqi Nationalist insurgents stronger in that they try (so they say) not to target civillians unless they are seen to be colloborating with the US forces like police, military, government, and gaining more home grown support.

But this news of Al-Qaeda being opposed by the Iraqi nationalist insurgents is nothing new to me. I first heard about it last year, on Channel 4 News I think, where one of the insurgent groups reportedly called for Al-Zarqawi's head to be seen on a plate and that he was a dark shadow across Iraq.

In an article I read recently (The link sadly long forgotten) The Iraqi insurgents said that they were overjoyed whenever someone from Al-Qaeda was killed by the US military, despite they fighting the US military too.



posted on Jan, 23 2006 @ 01:27 PM
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This is good news! In fact, didn’t a suni leader recently denounce the foreign fighters and tell them to leave? I think it was related to that woman who was kidnapped recently.

I think the Iraqis are finally learning that the only way they are going got get rid of us, is to get rid of the terrorist in their country. We now have a common enemy and a common goal!



posted on Jan, 23 2006 @ 01:42 PM
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Originally posted by Dronetek
This is good news! In fact, didn’t a suni leader recently denounce the foreign fighters and tell them to leave? I think it was related to that woman who was kidnapped recently.


Yep. There was another who told Al-Qaeda fighters to stop killing Iraqis.


Originally posted by Dronetek
I think the Iraqis are finally learning that the only way they are going got get rid of us, is to get rid of the terrorist in their country. We now have a common enemy and a common goal!


Make no mistake, the Iraqis taking part in the insurgency will still fight US-led troops, who they see as occupiers.



posted on Jan, 23 2006 @ 01:58 PM
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Make no mistake, the Iraqis taking part in the insurgency will still fight US-led troops, who they see as occupiers.


Of course that depends where in Iraq you are, but yes you are correct.



posted on Jan, 23 2006 @ 02:04 PM
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Yeah, I don't think this is really all that new.

Despite the myth that the Iraqi insurgency is a unified front of foreign Islamists, the truth is there are huge numbers of insurgent groups all with different agendas. There are Sunni nationalists, foreign Islamists, Sadrist Shia militias, all as violently opposed to each other as they are to the US occupation. The foreign fighters are a tiny minority at best.



posted on Jan, 23 2006 @ 02:08 PM
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The foreign fighters are a tiny minority at best.


I think "Tiny minority" is streching it a little. While I was there, most the people we went up against were Syrian and Saudi. My best friend just got back and he tells me they were almost always up against "Syrians with lots of money".

Even if they are the smaller group, they are responsible for most of the car bombs and civilians deaths.



posted on Jan, 23 2006 @ 02:34 PM
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Well I agree that the Al-Quaeda linked Islamists are definately responsible for the mass casualty attacks on civilians. They're trying to start a Sunni vs. Shia civil war after all.

They may certainly be the most destructive faction, but even the US Army has said foreigners only make up about 1% of the insurgents they've captured or killed... I suspect that a lot more of the financing and is coming from outside the country though.

[edit on 1/23/06 by xmotex]



posted on Jan, 24 2006 @ 10:20 AM
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Originally posted by Dronetek
Of course that depends where in Iraq you are, but yes you are correct.


In the area of Basra, the Shia militias major form of resistance is to infiltrate the police and other aspects of the Iraqi Security Forces there, and then limit their co-operation with the UK forces.

This is believed to have been why supposed members of the SAS were sent into Basra, to watch for Shia militia leaders.

The thing was, the militia/police knew all about it or caught wind of it, and there was a shootout, although other reports say the SAS members fired first (targeted assassination perhaps?).

The two SAS were cornered and imprisoned, which led to the Armoured Warriors being set fire to as they came to organise the release of the SAS members, which led to other Warriors to break the walls of the prison down.

You hear alot of bodies being found of Iraqi security forces or Shias, especially near Baghdad.

The media blame this on the Sunnis, but apparently, it's coming evident the Shia militias are doing it, killing those not co-operating with the Shia militias. regardless of being Shia or not.

Witnesses talk of men dressed in police uniforms, but it appears it is the Iraqi police (or Shia Militia members of the police) are doing it, the majority of the operations being organised from the Sadr City area of Baghdad.

Of course, you hear about the Iraqi police being blown up, this may be other resistance groups thinking the Shia Militias are colloborating, rather than infiltrating the police and other security services.

Different resistance methods clashing with each other in essence.


[edit on 24-1-2006 by Regensturm]



posted on Jan, 24 2006 @ 10:28 AM
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Originally posted by Dronetek

I think "Tiny minority" is streching it a little. While I was there, most the people we went up against were Syrian and Saudi. My best friend just got back and he tells me they were almost always up against "Syrians with lots of money".


The presence of Saudis, Syrians or Iranian backed groups like the Shia Militias don't surprise me.

There are those who think they are next after Iraq.

This may go up to their governments.

Secondly, there are those who see this as a war against Islam.

Third, a percentage of Saudis have a greater hatred of the US since troops were on Saudi soil which is considered blasphemous to have foreigners and non-muslims on Saudi Arabian soil in some people's eyes.

The US troops are all gone there now (Unless someone wants to correct me), but the disgruntlement remains.



posted on Jan, 24 2006 @ 10:29 AM
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You would think, that if the Iraqi's in ANbar Province have decided to kick out Al-Qaeda then it should be accomplished relatively quickly. Foreigners would stick out like a sore thumb to nay local Iraqi's and could easily be tracked.
If I was an Iraqi insurgent leader, I'd be passing information along ( by whatever means ) to US forces and let them deal with Al-Qaeda.



posted on Jan, 24 2006 @ 10:32 AM
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Originally posted by mad scientist
If I was an Iraqi insurgent leader, I'd be passing information along ( by whatever means ) to US forces and let them deal with Al-Qaeda.


That would be difficult for the Iraqi insurgents, as they would have to be careful the US forces don't find out who these Iraqi insurgents are, perhaps using intermediaries like Sunni clerics.

It would not surprise me if it is happening.



posted on Jan, 24 2006 @ 11:52 AM
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Keep in mind that this might degenerate into strife, not more support for the government. Also keep in mind that if the nationalists do work with the government, that they might turn on it after the jihadis are defeated, which, i beleive, is more or less what happened previously.



posted on Jan, 24 2006 @ 12:09 PM
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Originally posted by Regensturm

In the area of Basra, the Shia militias major form of resistance is to infiltrate the police and other aspects of the Iraqi Security Forces there, and then limit their co-operation with the UK forces.



We have a friend that came back after a year in the Baghdad area, he told us about the problems with the attacks on Iraqi military and police stations.

During the day they are friends but at night they can never tell.

They have lots of problems with weapons and ammo been stolen all the time from the Iraqi police and military post.

He also said that the attacks between groups have increased a lot in the last months prior to elections.

So they have to go into the Iraqis home looking for stolen weapons and during the raids they find a lot of American cash.

I guess buying and selling weapons is becoming a way to make money for some Iraqis.



posted on Jan, 25 2006 @ 06:10 AM
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Originally posted by marg6043

We have a friend that came back after a year in the Baghdad area, he told us about the problems with the attacks on Iraqi military and police stations.

During the day they are friends but at night they can never tell.

They have lots of problems with weapons and ammo been stolen all the time from the Iraqi police and military post.

He also said that the attacks between groups have increased a lot in the last months prior to elections.

So they have to go into the Iraqis home looking for stolen weapons and during the raids they find a lot of American cash.


Just a theory, could that be American cash by the US for them to kill certain members of other groups like Al-Qaeda in a 'enemy's enemy is my friend' sort of arrangement?

Would not surprise me.


Originally posted by marg6043
I guess buying and selling weapons is becoming a way to make money for some Iraqis.


Sadly.



posted on Jan, 25 2006 @ 10:39 AM
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I have wondered lately if we will find that a particular country is funding the Iraqi Al-Qaeda groups. It seems they are more interested in driving a division with the country then trying to expel US troops. Are they simply there to ensure civil war?

Sadly I fear once we leave, civil war will occur. This is after all three countries that were stupidly merged into a single non functional government.



posted on Jan, 25 2006 @ 10:53 AM
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I have wondered lately if we will find that a particular country is funding the Iraqi Al-Qaeda groups.

We know Iran and Syria both fund terrorists in Iraq. In fact Iran recently had a public "fund raiser" to recruit suicide bombers in iraq.

[edit on 25-1-2006 by Dronetek]







 
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