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The next Mars rover: MSL

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posted on Jan, 20 2006 @ 09:38 PM
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www.space.com...

Masr Science Labratory. Spirit and opportunity were the geologists, MSL is a chemist.

Gateway mission


MSL has evolved to have a set of essential characteristics:

Precision landing, on the order of 3 to 6 miles (5 to 10 kilometers) landing error ellipses versus 31 to 37 miles (50 to 60 kilometers) used by earlier landers;

Access to higher latitudes and thereby higher absolute elevations than Spirit and Opportunity since all latitudes south of 15 degrees are much higher in relief (above the martian "sea level"). Doing so opens up nearly 70% to 80% of the planet, if needed, to the MSL;

Longer-range mobility, wheeling from 3 to 16-plus miles (5 to 10-plus kilometers) during a nominal mission;

Analytical measurements of martian materials suitable for assessing some aspects of "life inference". space.com


Slated for a 2009 Landing, landing area will depend on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter as well as the lessons learned from the rovers, and otehr obiting sattilites

mod edit to use "ex" instead of "quote"
Posting work written by others. **ALL MEMBERS READ**
Quote Reference.

[edit on 21-1-2006 by sanctum]




posted on Jan, 21 2006 @ 05:21 AM
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The European Space Agency is also planning a Mars rover, for a landing in the 2010 timeframe.

More information:
Aurora Program - ExoMars

The European Parliament recently passed the budget ExoMars (and the whole Aurora program) - ESA actually received more cash for Aurora than they asked for, so the project planners were happy as you can imagine


E_T

posted on Jan, 21 2006 @ 07:25 AM
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Actually there isn't so much difference in mission, chemistry of surface depends greatly on geology. So no matter what is studied, it pretty much always overlaps also other areas of science.

One of the biggest differences after size is that this lander will use radioisotope thermoelectric generator so its operation won't be limited by available sunlight or factors causing decrease of sunlight. This is also the reason for much wider landing area possibilities.

And surprising you didn't find mission's homepage.
marsprogram.jpl.nasa.gov...



posted on Jan, 22 2006 @ 09:41 AM
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MPL is more of a chemist then a geologist since it is going ot have a rock grinder that will allow it to get accurate chemical composition of the materials it collects. Not like the Mars rovers which just passivly looks at what it finds.

Also since it is still in the planning stages NASA is hoping to have nuclear power, it is not confirmed yet... tho honestly I think having a Solar power back-up would be a good idea too.



posted on Jan, 22 2006 @ 10:17 AM
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Originally posted by Jehosephat
Also since it is still in the planning stages NASA is hoping to have nuclear power, it is not confirmed yet... tho honestly I think having a Solar power back-up would be a good idea too.


Why? Do the Voyagers have solar backups? Casinni? New Horizons? Nope. It would be a waste of money, and more importantly, weight.



posted on Jan, 22 2006 @ 01:44 PM
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I remember reading a couple years ago that one reason they wanted to go nuclear with this one is so they could record the temp for an entire martian year (a little under 2 earth years). But the funny thing is the solar powered ones have gone over that marker, and are still going today. But i'm sure that this rover will be much more impressive, and last several years on Mars. They were planning on having a laser which would burn into rocks...instead of the grinder thing that is on the current rovers...those only laster for around 20 rocks until they were dull...the laser should be indefinite...thats if they are still planning on having it.



posted on Jan, 22 2006 @ 02:09 PM
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Heres a more up-to-date article. As well as a few (more current) pics.

Mars Science Laboratory: Big Wheels on A Red Planet




posted on Jan, 22 2006 @ 10:29 PM
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A laser? Kewl we will then be able to Zap those pesky aliens and start our first interplanetary war!

The differance between Voyager and Cassini, is Solar power is still a viable source of energy on mars I think it really depends on the lattitude of the landing location.

I think there is much more the Probe could do with Nuclear power, but again, as I have said before it is still in the plannign stages and we dont know if they are going to go nuclear



posted on Jan, 23 2006 @ 03:53 PM
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Originally posted by Jehosephat
A laser? Kewl we will then be able to Zap those pesky aliens and start our first interplanetary war!


uhg...please dont give all the crazies here any more ideas.


But from everything I have read they all say nuclear...Do you have any articles that say Solar power? Even the newest renderings dont show solar panels.....So I think its safe to say that it will indeed be nuclear powered.







 
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