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How fast can we humanly possibly go in space?

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posted on Jan, 24 2006 @ 10:37 PM
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Ah, the Dark Side of the Force:


Originally posted by Vekar
...also the ability to survive the radiation.


Very true, and sublime. For at ultrahigh velocities, there are more kinds of radiation than we have dreamed of in our philosophy, Moriarity.

We are familiar with cosmic background radiation. But in the direction of travel at relativistic velocities, radiation is blue shifted. What this means is, what we see as visible blue light at rest is shifted progressively higher in frequency from dark ultraviolet through invisible x-rays and ultimately to gamma rays. Trying to shield against ever-higher frequency forward radiation presents a problem; but it is only the first of our many problems. The cosmic rays- or rather, particles- hit the ship with ever higher energies, and ever more exotic collision products: kind of like staring a linear accelerator in the face. Then come the specks, pebbles and rocks.

At high enough velocity, ship time slows- but without an exotic shielding technology, your 'hop' might be better described as a 'flash'.

So the answer is:



In normal space at 1-3 G's, we can go as fast as time and energy available will allow, within the constraints of allowable radiation absorbed dose, frontal impact erosion and consumable supplies available.


This sets a limit somewhat less than C.

Energy is less of a constraint that is commonly thought. 'Energy available' is not neccesarily limited to shipboard 'fuel'- space itself is a wonderful ocean of infinite energies. The Sun itself is a great gravitational accelerator and radiant energy source.

Search on M2P2 for some ideas.


Scotty, GET ME SOME SHIELDS!


How fast for how long...




posted on Jan, 25 2006 @ 12:03 AM
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I agree that slowly approaching c is the way to go but the problem with doing it that way is the MASSIVE amount of energy required, for a manned spaceship of reasonable size it would take more energy that whats currently avaliable....and for faster than light travel? well even if all known physical laws are broken and it turns out to be possible then the energy required would be more than infinite.....almost impossible. A much better way will be wormholes THROUGH space, not across space.

I about to start my Phd and it will center around blackhole/lightspeed theroy, wonder what ill discover, lol



posted on Jun, 17 2008 @ 01:07 PM
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What do you mean when you say massive energy required? what is required. Please, break it down baby style if you need to. Thanks



posted on Jun, 17 2008 @ 06:33 PM
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Originally posted by s13viper
....and for faster than light travel? well even if all known physical laws are broken and it turns out to be possible then the energy required would be more than infinite.....

Actually breaking the light speed limit is possible, if you use a clock onboard the craft to measure time.

At a constant 1 g acceleration it takes only 2.3 years to reach
Proxima Centauri (4.3 light years away), and less than 15 years to reach a galaxy 2.5 million light years away.


Details there.

You would need to decelerate half the time in order to stop at your destination. For example I did the calculation for a distance of 4 light years: 3.5 years elapsed on board, 5.6 years elapsed on Earth, max. speed = 0.90 c.



posted on Jun, 18 2008 @ 12:44 PM
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I'm surprised no one has pointed this out yet, but the light speed limit has been broken. Sorry to burst your intellectual bubbles.


All thanks to Lijun Wang. www.cbc.ca...


Scientists have finally exceeded the speed of light, causing a light pulse to travel hundreds of times faster than normal.......

The scientific statement "nothing with mass can travel faster than the speed of light" is an entirely different belief, one that has yet to be proven wrong. The NEC experiment caused a pulse of light, a group of waves with no mass, to go faster than light.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


The article goes on to say....


The key to the experiment was that the pulse reformed before it could have gotten there by simply travelling through empty space. This means that, when the waves of the light distorted, the pulse traveled forward in time.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


In case you didn't catch that......the article states that the beam of light actually exited the gas before it entered.


Time travel anyone?????



posted on Jun, 18 2008 @ 12:59 PM
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Riddle me this,

Since space has no gravity, and IF there is no object in view that you can use as a reference point near you (a planet or moon) how do you know you're even moving?

Edit,

And interstellar space...which is pitch black, how would you know which direction you'd be moving...if you are moving.

[edit on 18-6-2008 by Tomis_Nexis]



posted on Jun, 18 2008 @ 01:45 PM
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OK I have a stupid question, being that I am not a rocket scientist. Let's say we board an Saturn V rocket with infinite fuel, and when the stage fires that causes us to leave earth orbit fires, and we don't shut it off because we have infinite rocket fuel, what happens? Do we continue to go faster and faster or are we limited by the relative power of the engines themselves?

[edit on 18-6-2008 by rocksarerocks]



posted on Jun, 18 2008 @ 02:11 PM
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Originally posted by rocksarerocks
OK I have a stupid question, being that I am not a rocket scientist. Let's say we board an Saturn V rocket with infinite fuel, and when the stage fires that causes us to leave earth orbit fires, and we don't shut it off because we have infinite rocket fuel, what happens? Do we continue to go faster and faster or are we limited by the relative power of the engines themselves?

[edit on 18-6-2008 by rocksarerocks]


You'll go as fast as the engines can do. Unless you slingshot yourself using a gravitational pull from a moon or planet.



posted on Jun, 18 2008 @ 05:27 PM
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Originally posted by Tomis_Nexis
... and IF there is no object in view that you can use as a reference point near you (a planet or moon) how do you know you're even moving?

You don't. The theory of Relativity is based on the idea that there is no absolute speed, only relative speed.


And interstellar space...which is pitch black, how would you know which direction you'd be moving...if you are moving.

Pitch black? There are always stars to look at. At relativistic speeds there would be considerable doppler shifts. In the forward direction starlight would be blue-shifted, in the opposite direction red-shifted.



posted on Jun, 19 2008 @ 10:26 PM
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We don't need to travel at the speed of light any time soon. But I wonder to what speed our technology allows us to accelerate. What is our current speed limit. The Phoenix Mars Lander apparently travelled to Mars at around 75k mph. Can we go 2X that? 200k? 500k? 1,000k?

Does anyone know about new propulsion systems in the works that may get us there?



posted on Aug, 9 2008 @ 07:30 AM
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Hey how about this for a crazy idea, we figure out various methods, maybe using quantum mechanics to transform ourselves into light itself then travel at that speed.

Also you would have worked out various ways to convert the light beam to be very thin and long to prevent any collisions with solid objects and the eergy of the light would be significantly more just in case it disperses over the length of space that you travel due to radiation. Would that work?



posted on Aug, 9 2008 @ 09:26 AM
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Originally posted by s13viper
I about to start my Phd and it will center around blackhole/lightspeed theroy, wonder what ill discover, lol


Ah, one would assume that a PhD candidate would be able to spell PhD and theory.

Anyway, cool. What University are you planning to attend? Get good grades and work hard and you'll get there sooner than you think!

Good luck!



[edit on 9-8-2008 by Badge01]



posted on Aug, 9 2008 @ 11:25 AM
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Originally posted by nablator

Originally posted by Tomis_Nexis
And interstellar space...which is pitch black, how would you know which direction you'd be moving...if you are moving.

Pitch black? There are always stars to look at. At relativistic speeds there would be considerable doppler shifts. In the forward direction starlight would be blue-shifted, in the opposite direction red-shifted.

Right -- and even if a person is between galaxies, the galaxies themselves would be visible. Heck, we can even see the Andromeda Galaxy from Earth with our naked eyes.

[edit on 8/9/2008 by Soylent Green Is People]



posted on Aug, 9 2008 @ 12:07 PM
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I forget where I saw it at, but we are/have sent a probe propelled with ion thrusters...yea, just a beam of light. The theory is that it will steadily increase speed along its travel.

Link...

This link is a start...here is another:

Link...



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 04:54 PM
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reply to post by Shenroon
 


Thank you!!! lol



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 06:02 PM
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You have all over looked one very important thing and that is the abdundance in space of high speed meteroids and other such small objects. 2 high speed objects hitting eachother releases kinetic energy, that has to go somewhere, and going so fast means you will encounter and be struck by more meteroid type objects per unit of time then if you were going a slower speed, posing astructural hazard to the space craft and your body.



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 06:15 PM
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reply to post by NavalFC
 


They've recently developed a "deflector shield" that currently only blocks out certain types of radiation. Eventually they're hoping to be able to deflect meteorites and other debris at high speeds.



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 06:35 PM
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Everything is limited to our imagination and to our will power. Don't limit yourself to formulas and theories. Tesla already proved the existence of the Aether which makes gravity a direct by product. If you can accept this you can accept that the aether has superluminal speeds due it's longitudinal waves (meaning it acts practically instantaneously).

Harnessing it will make our wildest dreams come true. Tesla showed us a glimpse of this and today only a handful of people know what this man really did. Scientists at CERN should stop wasting everybody's time and money and work on something that has been actually shown experimentally than something that's only a theory. But don't worry everything is about to change soon. And not because some people in white coats.

[edit on 11-12-2008 by broli]

[edit on 11-12-2008 by broli]



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 09:19 PM
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You could eventually achieve just below lightspeed using conventional technology (see einstein).

You could use wormholes to close or fold the gaps in space (see michu kaku).

You could vibrate into another bubble (see holographic theory and string theory).

or you could listen to alot of what you are going to hear and use hyperspace (see star wars and star trek).

If that doesnt help you, i dont know what can...



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 09:43 PM
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Originally posted by Taledus
I forget where I saw it at, but we are/have sent a probe propelled with ion thrusters...yea, just a beam of light. The theory is that it will steadily increase speed along its travel.

Link...

This link is a start...here is another:

Link...



Ions are not photons and a stream of ions is not light.

One of the many problems with acceleration to lightspeed is that at relativistic speeds mass increases, as mass increases thrust has to increase to maintain the same rate of acceleration. So besides needing a huge amount of fuel you also need an engine which will produce effectively unlimited thrust or your acceleration will continue to decrease. Ion drives do not produce a lot of thrust.




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