The Bermuda Triangle Discussion

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Ox

posted on Jan, 21 2006 @ 07:54 AM
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It seems as if the triangle has been rather quiet in the past 10 years or so.. I dont remember hearing anything about it since I was a kid (I'm 28 now).. Could it have been an at sea testing site? For something? Some sort of new technology?

Could someone . Like.. a certain government have been excavating something there from the ocean floor and used scare tactics to keep prying eyes away?

It seems like around the times that the government were working on the Philadelphia project and what not that lot of these events took place..

Just a few things to think about.. Let me know what you think..
Jeff




posted on Jan, 21 2006 @ 05:08 PM
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It turns out there were some....inconcistancies with the story of the Mary Celeste.



On the Afternoon of December 5th 1872 half way between the Azores and the Portuguese coast the 'Dei Gratia' came up with a Brigantine which Captain Morehouse recognised as the 'Mary Celeste'. He knew Captain Briggs and had dined with him before he sailed. He was puzzled to see the ship yawing, coming into the wind and then falling off, she was out of control. He knew Captain Briggs to be a good seaman.




Lets at this point forget about steaming mugs of tea, ships cats, everything in supposed pristine condition. Certainly there were no half eaten breakfasts, and no phial of oil balanced on the sewing machine. Let us remember the vessel was observed out of control for two hours before she was boarded, and had been in heavy seas in the days previous.

The court record states "The Galley was in a bad state, the stove was knocked out of its place, and the cooking utensils were strewn around. The whole ship was a thoroughly wet mess. The Captains bed was not fit to sleep in and had to be dried."

www.maryceleste.net...

[edit on 1/21/2006 by Zaphod58]



posted on Jan, 22 2006 @ 01:49 PM
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Ah, man, you just spoiled a perfectly good ghost story, Zaphod
. I just hope you can live with yourself. I am scarred for life.

Seriously, thanks for enlightening me.



posted on Jan, 23 2006 @ 10:25 PM
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The salvage crew of the Mary Celeste only vanished after they got the $8,000 salvage fee in Gibralta. The ship was carrying industrial alcohol and was sailing the North Atlantic not the Bermuda area.
The vessel and its cargo were valued at $80,000. The authorities in the Maritime staff at Gibralta thought the salvage crew were pirates but settled the claim for the lesser amount because they couldn't prove any wrong doing.
You might be thinking of some other lost ship.



posted on Jan, 24 2006 @ 11:40 AM
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I watched a show on History last about USO (unidentified submerged objects) which was pretty good. The researchers talk about how Puerto Rico is a real hotspot for USO sightings, even the USN has reported sightings off the north coast of PR!! Anyway one of the researchers said something along the lines of they have reason to believe there could be some type of base in the southern part of the bermuda triangle. they said that the water is extremely deep in places, and there are underwater caverns etc.. and there have been tons of USO sightings in the area! I don't know what to think about it all, or what USO's are, but I thought I would mention it as it might help explain some of the wierd stuff in the triangle.



posted on Jan, 24 2006 @ 01:08 PM
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Although the Methane gas theory makes sense, what doesn't make sense is why have we not been able to find any of these missing vessels, planes and such, with the underwater submersibles that have been sent to look for them?



posted on Jan, 24 2006 @ 01:47 PM
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Really the only one that I've ever heard of them seriously looking for is Flight 19. And since no one knows where they entered the water, there's almost no chance of ever finding them.



posted on Jan, 24 2006 @ 05:44 PM
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I was in the navy (us) and have been through this gas pocket thingy. when it happened the skipper ordered flank speed to get us the he** out of here. It took us about 90 minutes at 30 knots to do so. This kind of thing doesn't just happen in a small space and go away fast.



posted on Jan, 24 2006 @ 05:47 PM
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The folks doing the modelling sank a supertanker model in under 10 seconds. You were lucky to have gotten out of it in one piecse. Depending on where it hits you, if you're caught in a bubble coming up, you can be gone before you even have time to blink.



posted on Jan, 24 2006 @ 08:28 PM
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That was a model as you say and it was static in the water not underway (moving).



posted on Jan, 24 2006 @ 08:30 PM
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They did moving as well. They pulled it through the tank, and set off a bubble under the bow, and it was gone in no time flat. The bow went underwater, and the props kept pushing forward, and down she went.



posted on Jan, 25 2006 @ 08:01 AM
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Obviously I couldn't tell you where we were in relation to the bubble. I don't remember a smell of methane or any thing else other than the sea looked like it was a boiling pot of water.
I often wondered what happened that day until I saw that special on TV. I called an old shipmate and we talked about it for hours.



posted on Jan, 25 2006 @ 09:37 AM
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hi guys.. have been a visitor here for a while but my second post only... been learning a lot here.

from what you guys are talkin about, looks like its what we call in the oil industry as the 'Shallow Gas' phenomenon. i work on an oil rig and know for a fact that this is something we dread. semisubmersible and fixed leg rigs have been known to sink in under 10 mins if a gas pocket is hit in the early stages of drilling when no riser (large diameter pipe through which oil wells are drilled) is in place.

some intresting links:

news.bbc.co.uk...
www.gomr.mms.gov...
www.jwco.com...



posted on Jan, 25 2006 @ 11:12 AM
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Centurion, That’s pretty wild that you have been thru a gas bubble and are hear to tell about it. I would imagine a warship would fair better than a tanker as it’s lighter, stronger and faster, but maybe not? I was wondering if you know where you were when you went thru the bubble? Did it happen to you in the triangle???

Zaphod, I saw the same show where they sank the model tanker in the naval test tank. I think the simulation was very accurate as the model was scaled properly as far as speed, weight etc.. and they did several tests with various bubble generation methods. If I recall correctly one massive bubble was much more catastrophic than lots of small bubbles.
I was thinking even if the bubble didn’t sink the ship from making it fall underwater if you will, I would think it could still break the ship apart especially a tanker. Don’t anti ship mines work by essentially creating a massive bubble under the hull making it break under its own weight? I would think a bug enough methane bubble could potentially have the same effect.


Cliff, I never realized that drill platforms face danger from gas pockets and bubbles. I was wondering if the purpose of the riser pipe you mentioned is to vent the gas to the surface safely and slowly? I read the last link that you posted about shallow gas blowouts and found it very informative. Excuse my ignorance, but I was wondering if a blowout is when a gas pocket collapses under the ocean floor which can cause a bottom supported rig to collapse? Thanks



posted on Jan, 25 2006 @ 11:32 AM
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My hypothesis about the Bermuda Triangle:

1. A variety of factors influence the magnetosphere and possibly are readjusting the position of the poles.

2. Prior to the poles settling into a new stable position they dance around.

3. The Bermuda Triangle is one such temporary and transient location.





posted on Jan, 25 2006 @ 06:03 PM
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Originally posted by warpboost

Cliff, I never realized that drill platforms face danger from gas pockets and bubbles. I was wondering if the purpose of the riser pipe you mentioned is to vent the gas to the surface safely and slowly? I read the last link that you posted about shallow gas blowouts and found it very informative. Excuse my ignorance, but I was wondering if a blowout is when a gas pocket collapses under the ocean floor which can cause a bottom supported rig to collapse? Thanks


a blowout is an uncotrolled venting of gas. a well is drilled with fluid (called drill mud) to clean the well of drilled cuttings and also to coll the drilling bit. since this mud contains chemicals and also cleaned out cuttings, one cannot discharge it into the sea (environment pollution) hence risers are used to carry this to surface.

www.lifewater.ca...
en.wikipedia.org...

the problem arises if gas gets into the riser and as such rapidly expands. a blowout preventer (large valves) is used to control this gas and vent it safely, preventing blowouts.

in the initial stages of drilling, risers are ot used as it is safer to let the gas bubble to surface. but sometimes the gas release is in huge amounts which causes the density of water to decrease thus reducing buoyancy (aireated/ gas saturated water). this is what causes floating rigs/vessels as well as leg supported rigs to sink.

i'm trying to find some links to the info and will post them as soon as i can.



posted on Jan, 25 2006 @ 06:11 PM
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Originally posted by soficrow
My hypothesis about the Bermuda Triangle:

1. A variety of factors influence the magnetosphere and possibly are readjusting the position of the poles.

2. Prior to the poles settling into a new stable position they dance around.

3. The Bermuda Triangle is one such temporary and transient location.





found some intresting info on pole wander:

ijolite.geology.uiuc.edu...

www.mq.edu.au...

being a geologist by qualification, i have studied about this phenomenon of pole wander, data seems to show that the continents wander and not the poles.



posted on Jan, 25 2006 @ 07:08 PM
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Originally posted by cliff
the problem arises if gas gets into the riser and as such rapidly expands. a blowout preventer (large valves) is used to control this gas and vent it safely, preventing blowouts.


I appreciate the info as I think I know understand how it works or at least much better.

In one of the links you posted earlier there is a diagram of a diverter which is what I assume is used to control the gas and vent it from the riser, but please correct me if I'm off.

This is the link

www.jwco.com...

Diagram showing diverter





posted on Jan, 25 2006 @ 08:44 PM
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We were underway out of Newport R.I. and were on our way to Rosey Roads (Roosevelt Roads Puerto Rico). The weather was very clear and quite tropical. I guess we were in the neighborhood of the triangle.



posted on Jan, 26 2006 @ 11:05 PM
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Originally posted by cliff
i have studied about this phenomenon of pole wander, data seems to show that the continents wander and not the poles.


I recall that too. Can you summarize an explanation of how the continents come to wander? I would be grateful


Also, straight cause and effect never really explains systemic stuff anyway. Do you have anything more related to systems theory?

Thanks - sofi





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