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Fluorescent Green Pigs Bred in Taiwan

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posted on Jan, 12 2006 @ 12:40 PM
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By injecting green proteins into pig embryo's, researchers in Taiwan have managed to successfully breed 3 male flourescent green pigs.
 



www.msnbc.msn.com
Updated: 8:04 a.m. ET Jan. 12, 2006

TAIPEI, Taiwan - Taiwan, home to the world’s first transgenic glowing fish, has successfully bred fluorescent green pigs that researchers hope will boost the island’s stem cell research, a professor said on Thursday.

By injecting fluorescent green protein into embryonic pigs, a research team at the island’s leading National Taiwan University managed to breed three male transgenic pigs, said professor Wu Shinn-Chih of the university’s Institute and Department of Animal Science and Technology.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Green pigs. What will we think of next. This is a pretty interesting step in genetic engineering. Boost in stem cell research, that can't be too bad. It's good that we're making steps like this, but part of me has to wonder, why breed green pigs? Why green, and why pigs? I wonder if there are any adverse effects on the pigs. Eh, pretty interesting.

Related News Links:
abcnews.go.com
news.bbc.co.uk
www.checkbiotech.org[ /url]
[url=http://dnaindia.com/report.asp?NewsID=1007121]dnaindia.com




posted on Jan, 12 2006 @ 12:45 PM
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Interesting, I know that similiar things have been done to jellyfish, but pigs! Crazy.

It begs to wonder if they have any defects of any kind though, like organs not working properly.



posted on Jan, 12 2006 @ 12:51 PM
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What I find most interesting about this article is that the green protein does not just make them look green on the outside. It also has turned the internal organs green! I wonder if their blood is green... shades of Vulcans



posted on Jan, 12 2006 @ 01:08 PM
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Pretty cool.

But in reality, not all that groundbreaking, yes, now we've done it in pigs.

The truth of the matter is that this has been done many times in other transgenics.

For example, here's a green mouse:

external image

Also, check out these green mice

In fact, this isn't the first time fluorescent proteins have been expressed in pigs.

Check out this pig (on the left) that expresses Yellow Fluorescent Protein (YFP), which is derived from GFP



Further...

check out this bunny, transgenic GFP also:

external image

[edit on 12-1-2006 by mattison0922]

Please be mindful of the image sizes!



[edit on 12-1-2006 by parrhesia]

[edit on 12-1-2006 by mattison0922]



posted on Jan, 12 2006 @ 01:12 PM
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Pork can no longer be known as "the other white meat"
now what?
Green ham, and eggs?



posted on Jan, 12 2006 @ 04:01 PM
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Now to get the Cat in the Hat to cook them for us and we'll be OK.

Friend of mine had some green ham and fed it to his nieghbors dog and it died! (Just kidding about the dog, but the ham was for real!)



posted on Jan, 12 2006 @ 04:04 PM
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Man, when I see stuff like this, I just feel like we are pushing all the new shiny buttons without having read the manual...

Scares the hell out of me....



posted on Jan, 12 2006 @ 04:27 PM
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i has been done in aquaruim fish too iff i remeber...



posted on Jan, 12 2006 @ 04:58 PM
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something for traffic safety..
if the green pig crosses you may cross the road
if the red pig crosses the road you must stop.




posted on Jan, 12 2006 @ 05:45 PM
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I see that it's been done in other animals, though its still pretty strange. I mean really, glow in the dark pigs?

Just thought it was a pretty interesting story.

--Kit.



posted on Jan, 12 2006 @ 05:53 PM
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The reason this could be usefull is if we can do this in say certain plants that turn certain colours depending on the toxins it absorbes with its roots. Sort of like a Biological toxin detector.

We could even have it turn into shades so when it gets to a certain colour we know to harvest them and possibly get some usefull compounds and materials for our pollution remediation efforts.

[edit on 12-1-2006 by sardion2000]



posted on Jan, 12 2006 @ 05:54 PM
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Originally posted by sardion2000
Sort of like a Biological toxin detector.


But in pigs?

--Kit.



posted on Jan, 12 2006 @ 05:56 PM
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Originally posted by Kitsunegari

Originally posted by sardion2000
Sort of like a Biological toxin detector.


But in pigs?

--Kit.


:shrug: you gotta start somewhere. Pigs don't pollinate either and are inherintly safer to work on the GM crops.



posted on Jan, 12 2006 @ 05:57 PM
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Originally posted by loam
Man, when I see stuff like this, I just feel like we are pushing all the new shiny buttons without having read the manual...

Scares the hell out of me....


You could say that about any technology really.

How can you read the manual anyway?



posted on Jan, 12 2006 @ 06:01 PM
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Originally posted by sardion2000
Pigs don't pollinate either and are inherintly safer to work on the GM crops.


See now I would think the opposite. If I were in the position to choose whether to experiment on pigs or plants, I would choose plants. In controlled conditions, in a labratory setting, I wouldn't think anyone would choose to experiment on animals over plants. Never thought of it that way.

--Kit.



posted on Jan, 12 2006 @ 07:06 PM
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Originally posted by Kitsunegari
See now I would think the opposite. If I were in the position to choose whether to experiment on pigs or plants, I would choose plants. In controlled conditions, in a labratory setting, I wouldn't think anyone would choose to experiment on animals over plants. Never thought of it that way.

--Kit.

Depends on the goals of your research really. I've never wanted to do animal work myself... but if your research is somehow directly applicable to cancer for example... research on plants isn't probably going to yield much useful info. The choice of model organism is often dependent on which animals are a good model for the disease in particular. Beagles are supposedly a good model for particular brain cancers... there's an alzheimer's mouse, etc.



posted on Jan, 12 2006 @ 08:11 PM
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Originally posted by sardion2000
The reason this could be usefull is if we can do this in say certain plants that turn certain colours depending on the toxins it absorbes with its roots. Sort of like a Biological toxin detector.


Not sure if you are aware or not, but something similar has been done. Some plants were genetically engineered to detect landmines. There is definitely promise in finding useful applications of genetic engineering.

www.gizmag.com...

However, as Loam mentioned, I have to wonder about possible unintended consequences to the engineered organisms. Will the green pig suffer healthwise as a result of the modifications? It seems fine in the picture, but who knows? I've read that cloned animals tend to have much higher mortality rates, and I wonder if this is true for genetically modified animals, as well?

I think it's good that we are doing research in this area, as I feel that there is more untapped potential in biological research than in almost any other area in any field. It is critical, however, that we take it slowly, and take as many precautions and as much data as possible, in order to minimize any unforeseen problems with this technology.



posted on Jan, 13 2006 @ 10:30 AM
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I couldn't resist, but since the topic of reproductive behavior has come up between animals and plants....any care to comment on RABBITs?




Stem cell experts seek rabbit-human embryo

British scientists are seeking permission to create hybrid embryos in the lab by fusing human cells with rabbit eggs. If granted consent, the team will use the embryos to produce stem cells that carry genetic defects, in the hope that studying them will help understand the complex mechanisms behind incurable human diseases.
The proposal drew strong criticism from opponents to embryo research who yesterday challenged the ethics of the research and branded the work repugnant.

Plans for the experiments have been put forward by Professor Chris Shaw, a neurologist and expert in motor neurone disease at King's College London, and Professor Ian Wilmut, the Edinburgh University-based creator of Dolly the sheep, as a way of overcoming the shortage of fresh human eggs available for research.

"The fertility of rabbits is legendary," said Prof Shaw.



Sorry, couldn't help myself....

In all seriousness, I too agree that playing this genetic game with plants is FAR more dangerous....but that doesn't mean that the risks with animal manipulations are really any better. It's like the difference between playing with fire and lightening...both can hurt you, if you don't watch what you are doing.



posted on Jan, 13 2006 @ 12:04 PM
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when somebody tells you "when pigs fly" show them this picture





[edit on 13-1-2006 by scienceguy94]



posted on Jan, 13 2006 @ 12:14 PM
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in the UK at the moment - might not this lead to some new sport. I can just see the adverts now - night hunting boar - without needing to use torches - ifog - sorry I jest but the idea of glowing green pigs just caught my eye on a slow friday afternoon.




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