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New Build CH-53K for MARINES

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posted on Jan, 10 2006 @ 08:26 AM
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NAVAIR PATUXENT RIVER, Md. --- A new heavy lift helicopter is now officially in the pipeline for the Marine Corps following a Dec. 22, 2005 decision by the Honorable. Kenneth R. Krieg, under secretary of defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics to authorize the Heavy Lift Replacement program here to begin a $4.4 billion development program for the aircraft.

A "Cost Plus Award Fee" contract for the System Development and Demonstration phase, estimated to be approximately $2.9 billion, is expected to be signed with Sikorsky in March 2006.

An Initial System Development and Demonstration contract worth $8.8 million to Sikorsky was signed January 3. A follow-on ISDD contract is expected in several weeks. An exact figure for that contract is not yet known.
www.defense-aerospace.com..." target="_blank" class="postlink">LINK




www.connpost.com...

Marines go with Sikorsky
Heavy-lift project worth $19b to Stratford contractor
PETER URBAN purban@ctpost.com

WASHINGTON — Sikorsky Aircraft of Stratford will develop the Marine Corps' new heavy-lift helicopter over the next decade, bringing in nearly $19 billion for the Connecticut defense contractor. Sikorsky is scheduled to deliver the first of 156 new CH-53K helicopters to the Marines starting in 2015. Until then, the company will receive an estimated $4.2 billion to totally revamp the Marines' CH-53E Super Stallion.
Col. Paul Coisetiere, Marine program manager, and Sikorsky Program Manager David Haines described the project in detail for the first time at a press conference Thursday at the Pentagon.


It will be very interesting to see it perform against the older machines,
in speed,lifting capabilities,cockpit layout etc.....


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[edit on 10/1/2006 by Mirthful Me]




posted on Jan, 10 2006 @ 10:04 AM
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Nice thread


It is a nice helicopter...

external image

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[edit on 10/1/2006 by Mirthful Me]



posted on Jan, 10 2006 @ 12:03 PM
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$ 4.4 billion to revamp an existing design?




You know, sometimes you lot on that side of the pond have more money than sense!!



posted on Jan, 10 2006 @ 12:37 PM
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Yes, let's spend millions of dollars revamping a design that currently requires 44 man hours of maintenance for EVERY HOUR of flight time. Now THERE'S a bright idea. Thank you Pentagon.



posted on Jan, 11 2006 @ 12:13 PM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
Yes, let's spend millions of dollars revamping a design that currently requires 44 man hours of maintenance for EVERY HOUR of flight time. Now THERE'S a bright idea. Thank you Pentagon.


There is a reason for that. The helicopters being used now are very old, upward of 20-30 years on each airframe. The age of these craft require them to have much maintenance. The revamping of the design would allow the troops to get a new helicopter faster than if one was designed from scratch. Also, many improvements will be made that will increase reliability and capabilities.



posted on Jan, 11 2006 @ 01:06 PM
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We had HH-53s at Hickam when we first got back here in 1983, and they were a piece of junk then too. They spent a lot of time sitting in the hangar then, and we had one go down on a ship attempting a rescue, killing the crew of 7. It had just come out of maintenance, and when they were hovering over the ship, the tail folded. That was 22 years ago, and even with an upgrade it's still going to be a maintenance intensive bird. Maybe not at 44-1, but still intensive.



posted on Jan, 11 2006 @ 02:23 PM
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I have great tendency to agree with Zaphod on this.
This revamping is going to cost an absurd amount and hardly be justified to some varying degrees.





seekerof



posted on Jan, 11 2006 @ 02:30 PM
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Originally posted by jetsetter

There is a reason for that. The helicopters being used now are very old, upward of 20-30 years on each airframe. The age of these craft require them to have much maintenance. The revamping of the design would allow the troops to get a new helicopter faster than if one was designed from scratch. Also, many improvements will be made that will increase reliability and capabilities.



The US Navy weren't even considering that argument for the Tomcat....



posted on Jan, 11 2006 @ 07:06 PM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
We had HH-53s at Hickam when we first got back here in 1983, and they were a piece of junk then too. They spent a lot of time sitting in the hangar then, and we had one go down on a ship attempting a rescue, killing the crew of 7. It had just come out of maintenance, and when they were hovering over the ship, the tail folded. That was 22 years ago, and even with an upgrade it's still going to be a maintenance intensive bird. Maybe not at 44-1, but still intensive.


Seems that you had seen the Airforce variant of the airframe. Also, many people don't realize that the 53 is the largest helicopter in US military service.


The Super Stallion continues to undergo improvements that increase operational readiness and safety. Modifications, such as a night vision system, heads up display, global positioning system, UHF/VHF jam-resistant radios, crashworthy seats, and number two engine fire detectors, enhance the aircraft's survivability and capability. During 1998, the Fleet received three new production CH-53Es. In June 1998, engineers successfully completed a critical design review for an H-53 and H-60 Integrated Mechanical Diagnostics (IMD) Health and Usage Monitoring System (HUMS) that will integrate, test, and procure a commercial/military "dual use" mechanical diagnostic system.

From FY-96 through FY-98, a Service Life Assessment Program (SLAP) was conducted to develop usage and fatigue life profiles for the H-53E. The resultant SLAP Report will serve to justify commencement of Phase I of the Service Life Extension Program (SLEP) which is funded in APN-5. In addition, in FY-98, the program completes a White House requirement to competitively procure, install, test and evaluate an Integrated Mechanical Diagnostic (IMD) system on two Marine Corps CH-53E helicopters as an Early Operational Assessment (EOA). In FY-99 RDT&E, Service Life Assessment Program (SLAP) commenced a two year effort on the CH-53D. The Marine Corps Aviation Plan shows the CH-53D remaining in service until 2008. Therefore a Service Life Assessment Program (SLAP) must be conducted in order to ascertain what actions must be taken to safely operate the aircraft until it is replaced by the MV-22.
www.globalsecurity.org...



posted on Jan, 11 2006 @ 10:20 PM
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The link below is current and it tells how bad a replacement is needed.

These things were already beginning to retire...and set to be dead around 2012, and its replacement was to last until around 2025...They cant possibly think that this "fix" will keep em' operational until that distant date.
BTW...Does "Revamp" mean just upgrade and overhual existing ones? OR Build new ones but with the same specs?

I also dont like the idea of spending billions on this aging (over 15 years old) helicopter, but a new one would likely be many times more expensive then just updating this one, however I do think a replacement is necessary.

CH-53K Helos



posted on Jan, 11 2006 @ 10:36 PM
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ok...done a little more looking...and this might not be a bad thing.

If they take the cheaper route now...they will devote more money to its future replacement.

If the HLR program goes to a revamped Stallion, then perhaps by around 2020, is when they could begin the phase-out of them with the all new Quad tilt rotor concept, The Army's JHL program.





posted on Jan, 11 2006 @ 11:12 PM
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These will be brand new helicopters. The CH-53X is bigger than the version that are being used now.



posted on Jan, 12 2006 @ 12:15 PM
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I think they need to just get totaly new helicopters.
The first helo picture, looks like the thing was designed in the 1950's.

Not much more to say, so yeah.



posted on Jan, 12 2006 @ 01:49 PM
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Originally posted by iori_komei
I think they need to just get totaly new helicopters.
The first helo picture, looks like the thing was designed in the 1950's.
Not much more to say, so yeah.


No, it was designed in the 80's. Helicopters dont have the lifespan aircraft do, they could never live as long as the B-52.

I'm sure its much cheaper to revamp them, so i'd go that route.

I think all the different military branches need to do a better job of integration, and stop making 2 different aircraft for the same role.

I think the quad tilt rotor could replace quite a bit, Not just the stallion, but also the C-130. And have it be the Aircraft of choice for several future platforms, like the JHL & FTR. It could be used by the AF, Navy, Marines, Army...you name it.



posted on Jan, 12 2006 @ 03:27 PM
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No, it was designed in the 80's. Helicopters dont have the lifespan aircraft do, they could never live as long as the B-52.

I did'nt think it was that old, what I mean, is the design looks like something that people in the 50s would have come up with.



posted on Jan, 12 2006 @ 03:55 PM
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53s have been around for a while but the design has seen a LOT of revamping.

The Marines NEED the 53 as it's the only thing they've got with that much lift power.
It's like the Army still operating their Chinooks.

The alternative is to abandon heavy lift completely.



posted on Jan, 12 2006 @ 05:37 PM
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As a current builder of these rotorcraft for Sikorsky I have a bit of information that may shed some light as to whether or not they'll be using the same airframes with the same old blueprints.

These will be NEW aircraft...The revamp will consist of more than just newer engines and avionics. The airframe is going to be made six inches wider and six inches taller to accommodate a Hummer, something that not even the V-22 can do. The engines fill be more economical to operate and maintain. The airframe structure will consist of more machined parts like the CH-60M models (replacing CH-60L Blackhawk) allowing for a more rigid and stronger design.

To tell you the truth I can't what to start building them....I love a new challenge!




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